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By Ken Daley and Ken Daley,Los Angeles Daily News | April 17, 1995
VERO BEACH, Fla. -- The estrangement has been painful, its origin still shrouded in mystery and its embarrassing duration spoken of only in whispers.But, for the first time in six years, there are indications that the greatest living Dodger might be coming home."
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SPORTS
March 1, 2010
Sandy Koufax has been in the Mets' camp working with Oliver Perez and Johan Santana . His message was the value of hitting the corners. " Warren Spahn used to say the plate is 17 inches wide, and 15 belong to the hitter," Koufax said. … The Mariners' Dustin Ackley has a chance to follow the path of the White Sox's Gordon Beckham , contributing in a big way in his first full season as a pro. Ackley played center field and first base at North Carolina but has been moved to second base, where he has Chase Utley potential.
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SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 28, 2001
Save for Cal Ripken's emotional farewell tour, the recently completed Orioles season was definitely a year to forget for hometown fans. But 35 years ago, it was truly a festive time in Baltimore. The youthful 1966 Orioles had just breezed to their first American League pennant by a nine-game margin, but were World Series underdogs to a veteran Los Angeles Dodgers team that boasted baseball's finest 1-2 pitching punch in Sandy Koufax and Don Drysdale. And they were pointedly reminded of this supposed mismatch on their ride to Dodger Stadium for the opening game.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | May 9, 2004
No one should be surprised that Roger Clemens has gotten off to the best start of any pitcher in baseball. The Rocket is one of those physical anomalies that comes around once or twice a generation, just like another Texas-bred Hall of Famer who pitched well into his 40s without missing a beat. Nolan Ryan defied anatomical science by throwing a baseball nearly 100 mph at a point when most major league pitchers are 10 years into the charity golf circuit. Clemens could pitch until he is 46 if he were so inclined, but he probably will stop at 42 with an unprecedented seventh Cy Young Award after this season.
NEWS
By Milton Bates | March 11, 1991
WEATHER and the gods cooperating, he was to take the mound again today -- 45-year-old Jim Palmer, driven by who-knows-what to return to baseball. The graceful Oriole pitching legend is trying to defy the long, long odds, and cynics and romantics alike can only root for him.One's mind fast-reverses to a fall day a quarter-century ago. Oct. 6, 1966. Game 2 of the World Series between world champion Los Angeles Dodgers and upstart AL winners, the Orioles of Baltimore, paced by triple-crown winner Frank Robinson.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2002
Making historical comparisons is a tricky business in baseball, especially in this era of inflated offensive statistics and diluted pitching talent, but the dominating performance of Arizona Diamondbacks starters Randy Johnson and Curt Schilling begs for a little perspective. Particularly now. The Orioles open a three-game interleague series against the defending world champions tonight at Bank One Ballpark in Phoenix, and they may want to make some hay in the opener against No. 5 starter Brian Anderson because the next two games present the biggest challenge of this rebuilding season.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2000
St. Louis Cardinals superstar Mark McGwire has drawn his line in the sand. Baseball's reigning home run king figures to be well into the 600s by the end of the 2001 season, but he reiterated recently that he will not even attempt to challenge the all-time home run mark if baseball delays or interrupts another season with a work stoppage. "If there is a lockout or strike after next year, you won't see me in uniform as a player again ever," McGwire said during the Cardinals' recent visit to Arizona's Bank One Ballpark.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | March 21, 1992
DUNEDIN, Fla. -- Well, here we go. The Orioles are seducing us. Isn't that something?It wasn't supposed to happen. Not this spring. Not with a team coming off a 95-loss season. But here we go. The Orioles are seducing us with their starting pitching.We know better. We do. We don't chew tobacco but we know a few things, right? We know it is only spring, that the games don't matter, that mirages are a staple of the season. We know it is an unwise man who invests in March's progress.No matter.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2003
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Frustration, disgust and disbelief. The Orioles were a collection of all those emotions the last time they were together on a ball field. The 4-32 stretch to end last season sapped their spirit and tested their resolve. For inspiration this offseason, Orioles players could read from Jane Leavy's latest book, Sandy Koufax: A Lefty's Legacy. In it, Leavy describes Koufax's frustration at the end of the 1960 season. He was so upset with himself, he threw his glove and spikes into a clubhouse trash bin, vowing to quit.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | May 9, 2004
No one should be surprised that Roger Clemens has gotten off to the best start of any pitcher in baseball. The Rocket is one of those physical anomalies that comes around once or twice a generation, just like another Texas-bred Hall of Famer who pitched well into his 40s without missing a beat. Nolan Ryan defied anatomical science by throwing a baseball nearly 100 mph at a point when most major league pitchers are 10 years into the charity golf circuit. Clemens could pitch until he is 46 if he were so inclined, but he probably will stop at 42 with an unprecedented seventh Cy Young Award after this season.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | February 23, 2003
VERO BEACH, Fla. - No sign of Sandy Koufax in Dodgertown yesterday. The tall lefty has made up his mind, and everyone who knows him figures the decision will stand. You could see hard-working Maury Wills conducting bunting drills on a small practice diamond called Maury's Pit. You could see Tommy Lasorda buzzing down Tommy Lasorda Drive in his golf cart, yapping with fans and reporters. You could see palm trees surrounding the acres of practice fields that make up Dodgertown, a huge former air base that the Dodgers have called their spring training home since 1948.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2003
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Frustration, disgust and disbelief. The Orioles were a collection of all those emotions the last time they were together on a ball field. The 4-32 stretch to end last season sapped their spirit and tested their resolve. For inspiration this offseason, Orioles players could read from Jane Leavy's latest book, Sandy Koufax: A Lefty's Legacy. In it, Leavy describes Koufax's frustration at the end of the 1960 season. He was so upset with himself, he threw his glove and spikes into a clubhouse trash bin, vowing to quit.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Olesker and By Michael Olesker,Sun Staff | November 10, 2002
Sandy Koufax: A Lefty's Legacy, by Jane Leavy. HarperCollins. 304 pages. $23.95. Among Jews of my baby-boom generation, baseball's Sandy Koufax was a kind of inside joke. Among ourselves, we kvelled over him. But, if a gentile friend mentioned the Dodgers' glorious lefty and his religious heritage, we were apt to strike a nonchalant pose and say, "Koufax? Uh, yeah, he's probably one of the better Jewish ballplayers." As if. As if there were hundreds of others, past and present. As if we could hold aloft Hank Greenberg and Al Rosen and simply keep going forever, instead of digging for the likes of Mike Epstein and Ron Bloomberg and Rod Carew, who was never actually a Jew but at least married one. When you're this desperate for role models, close counts.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2002
Making historical comparisons is a tricky business in baseball, especially in this era of inflated offensive statistics and diluted pitching talent, but the dominating performance of Arizona Diamondbacks starters Randy Johnson and Curt Schilling begs for a little perspective. Particularly now. The Orioles open a three-game interleague series against the defending world champions tonight at Bank One Ballpark in Phoenix, and they may want to make some hay in the opener against No. 5 starter Brian Anderson because the next two games present the biggest challenge of this rebuilding season.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 28, 2001
Save for Cal Ripken's emotional farewell tour, the recently completed Orioles season was definitely a year to forget for hometown fans. But 35 years ago, it was truly a festive time in Baltimore. The youthful 1966 Orioles had just breezed to their first American League pennant by a nine-game margin, but were World Series underdogs to a veteran Los Angeles Dodgers team that boasted baseball's finest 1-2 pitching punch in Sandy Koufax and Don Drysdale. And they were pointedly reminded of this supposed mismatch on their ride to Dodger Stadium for the opening game.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2000
St. Louis Cardinals superstar Mark McGwire has drawn his line in the sand. Baseball's reigning home run king figures to be well into the 600s by the end of the 2001 season, but he reiterated recently that he will not even attempt to challenge the all-time home run mark if baseball delays or interrupts another season with a work stoppage. "If there is a lockout or strike after next year, you won't see me in uniform as a player again ever," McGwire said during the Cardinals' recent visit to Arizona's Bank One Ballpark.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Olesker and By Michael Olesker,Sun Staff | November 10, 2002
Sandy Koufax: A Lefty's Legacy, by Jane Leavy. HarperCollins. 304 pages. $23.95. Among Jews of my baby-boom generation, baseball's Sandy Koufax was a kind of inside joke. Among ourselves, we kvelled over him. But, if a gentile friend mentioned the Dodgers' glorious lefty and his religious heritage, we were apt to strike a nonchalant pose and say, "Koufax? Uh, yeah, he's probably one of the better Jewish ballplayers." As if. As if there were hundreds of others, past and present. As if we could hold aloft Hank Greenberg and Al Rosen and simply keep going forever, instead of digging for the likes of Mike Epstein and Ron Bloomberg and Rod Carew, who was never actually a Jew but at least married one. When you're this desperate for role models, close counts.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | February 23, 2003
VERO BEACH, Fla. - No sign of Sandy Koufax in Dodgertown yesterday. The tall lefty has made up his mind, and everyone who knows him figures the decision will stand. You could see hard-working Maury Wills conducting bunting drills on a small practice diamond called Maury's Pit. You could see Tommy Lasorda buzzing down Tommy Lasorda Drive in his golf cart, yapping with fans and reporters. You could see palm trees surrounding the acres of practice fields that make up Dodgertown, a huge former air base that the Dodgers have called their spring training home since 1948.
SPORTS
By Ken Daley and Ken Daley,Los Angeles Daily News | April 17, 1995
VERO BEACH, Fla. -- The estrangement has been painful, its origin still shrouded in mystery and its embarrassing duration spoken of only in whispers.But, for the first time in six years, there are indications that the greatest living Dodger might be coming home."
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | August 9, 1992
BARCELONA, Spain -- I can see the other side. The games were lopsided. The Dreamers stayed in $900-a-night hotel rooms and needed police-helicopter escorts. Is this the Olympics?And, yes, it seemed the players grew most emotional not when they were defending an opponent, but when they were defending a shoe contract.I get it. I understand.And I don't care.I love the Dream Team.I love the idea of it. I love the feel of it. I love, as Chuck Daly said, the majesty of it.This was the ultimate for anyone who's ever had a basketball jones.
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