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By Knight-Ridder News Service | February 21, 1993
PHILADELPHIA -- He began feeling himself being tugged in several directions, often away from his offense.At times over the past two seasons, Eagles coach Rich Kotite must have felt like a juggler with one too many bowling pins to catch.Scouting. Preparation. Practice. Personnel decisions. Game-planning. Meetings with management. Snap game-day decisions. Daily post-practice press conferences. Practicepreparation. Game preparation. Team meetings. Play-calling. Public relations. Psychologist.
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SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1996
During their game against the Steelers in Pittsburgh earlier this season, the Ravens had a first down taken away from them, even though the chain gang had moved the sticks. Later that week, coach Ted Marchibroda got a call from the league office, admitting the officials had made a mistake.That's the way the NFL likes to handle its officiating mistakes: behind closed doors with no fanfare.Since the Steelers won the game in a rout, that gaffe got little attention.The NFL has a "speak no evil, see no evil, hear no evil" policy on officials.
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SPORTS
By Dave Caldwell and Dave Caldwell,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 2, 1990
PHILADELPHIA -- Less than 24 hours after the Philadelphia Eagles' most satisfying victory of the season -- a 31-13 thrashing of the previously undefeated New York Giants -- offensive coordinator Rich Kotite was stopped in a corner of the team's locker room, had a microphone thrust under his chin and was asked for a forecast.How would he alter the offensive game plan for today's game against the Buffalo Bills, who have a ferocious defense and who play in a city renowned for its horrible weather?
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1996
The conventional wisdom used to be that NFL free agency would hurt small-market teams and help big-market teams.It hasn't quite worked out that way.The Green Bay Packers' crushing, 39-13 victory over the Philadelphia Eagles on Monday night showed that the NFL's smallest town, with a population under 100,000, is home to one of the league's best teams.Meanwhile, Los Angeles, the nation's second-largest city, doesn't have a team. Houston, the fourth-largest city, is on the verge of losing its team.
SPORTS
By Mark Bowden and Mark Bowden,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 7, 1991
TAMPA, Fla. -- As defeats go, the Philadelphia Eagles' 14-13 loss yesterday to the woeful Tampa Bay Buccaneers was shattering.Dazed and angry defensive players expressed dismay and disappointment at coach Rich Kotite's super-cautious offensive strategy.As a unit, the defense had done all it could and more: intercepted three passes, scored a touchdown, sacked Tampa Bay three times for a total of 24 yards, forced four fumbles and recovered three fumbles.But it wasn't enough.Kotite's offense ran the ball 39 times, plunging into the line on most of those plays and averaging less than 3 yards per carry.
SPORTS
By Jack McCaffery and Jack McCaffery,Special to The Sun | August 25, 1991
Philadelphia -- One hundred minutes into his first full practice as head coach of the Philadelphia Eagles, Rich Kotite blew his whistle.He called it a morning.He called it an era.The practice was short but organized. Brief but deliberate. Purposeful and every bit as businesslike as owner Norman Braman had mandated last winter, when he called for a change in coaches and for a change in attitudes.The five-year Buddy Ryan era ended poetically enough in an unsightly 20-6 playoff loss to the Washington Redskins at Veterans Stadium, during which Ryan temporarily benched quarterback Randall Cunningham in favor of Jim McMahon.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 22, 1991
Philadelphia -- Rich Kotite swivels animatedly in the chair behind his desk, wearing a navy-blue "CBS Sports" baseball cap and chewing on a thick cigar. The coach of the Philadelphia Eagles is talking about what has been gained, not what was lost, in a 9-6 season that will conclude with today's 4 p.m. visit by the Washington Redskins.He is upbeat, almost glowing. His is definitely not a hot seat."I'm not going to let the disappointment of missing the playoffs in any way deter from the accomplishment this football team has made," he says.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Staff Writer | August 17, 1993
West Chester, Pa. -- The field doesn't tilt any more when the defense trots on. The swagger isn't as pronounced as it once was. The talk isn't as trashy, either, unless you listen to linebacker Seth Joyner, who has spoken to the media only once this summer.Gang Green, that fierce defensive unit that was always the better half of the Philadelphia Eagles' work force, doesn't work here any more. Not so it's recognizable, anyway. And not since Reggie White led the free-agent exodus out of Philadelphia during the off-season.
SPORTS
By Tim Cowlishaw and Tim Cowlishaw,Dallas Morning News | December 15, 1991
PHILADELPHIA -- Imagine spending 18 years as an assistant football coach. Imagine finally getting the chance to run the show.Now imagine standing on the sideline at Green Bay's Lambeau Field -- the first quarter of your first game as head coach -- watching your franchise quarterback leave the field on the back of a cart, his season over almost before it had begun."
SPORTS
By Tim Panaccio and Tim Panaccio,Knight-Ridder | November 3, 1992
PHILADELPHIA -- Stunning Randall Cunningham -- and a few hundred thousand Philadelphia Eagles fans -- coach Rich Kotite reversed himself yesterday and announced that he will not start the moody, sensitive and slumping quarterback Sunday against the Los Angeles Raiders.And if that were not enough to set the Eagles spinning, Kotite added a little extra twist to the soap opera.The coach said that he would start backup quarterback Jim McMahon on Sunday but that Cunningham would return to his starter's role in two weeks when the Eagles travel to Milwaukee to play the Green Bay Packers.
SPORTS
By Joe Gergen and Joe Gergen,NEWSDAY | October 22, 1995
HEMPSTEAD, N.Y. -- Better prepared for the inevitable question than the forthcoming contest, Boomer Esiason waved his copy of the game plan at the media horde advancing on his locker. "Got my plays today," he said. "Look at this."And he opened the folder to a page where someone very close to the ailing quarterback of the New York Jets had printed, in red ink, the inscription:"Foley!Foley!Foley!"It was Esiason's little joke on himself, an opportunity to transform a serious condition into a source of humor.
SPORTS
By VITO STELLINO | August 13, 1995
It was only a one-year phenomenon, but it was a year that will be remembered a long time.Ten years ago this fall, the Chicago Bears took the NFL and America by storm. There have been better teams -- although their 18-1 record put them in the top echelon -- but maybe none as colorful.There was the Super Bowl shuffle and the Fridge, and Walter Payton and Mike Ditka barely tolerating Buddy Ryan on the sidelines.Then there was the ringleader of it all, the punky, outspoken quarterback, Jim McMahon, who set the tone for that rowdy band.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Sun Staff Writer | December 27, 1994
Rich Kotite is gone, Tom Flores probably is going, Dick Vermeil and Dennis Erickson may be coming and Sam Wyche could get a reprieve.That's the situation among NFL coaches today after Kotite was fired yesterday by Philadelphia Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie.Kotite's departure became a foregone conclusion as the team faded, losing its last seven games after a 7-2 start.But it might have taken a Super Bowl victory to save Kotite's job once Lurie bought the team from Norman Braman for a record $185 million last spring.
SPORTS
By BILL TANTON | December 13, 1994
I'm really enjoying this NFL season. Baltimore people don't often say that. At least they don't admit it.In our fair city, football fans like to say the NFL is so boring, so predictable. Rejected suitors -- and that's what we are, where the NFL is concerned -- often find flaws in what was once the object of their affections.The NFL predictable? Are you kidding? Is there a football fan in America who would have predicted the New York Giants, after losing seven straight, would come back as they have?
SPORTS
By S. A. Paolantonio and S. A. Paolantonio,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 14, 1994
PHILADELPHIA -- Flat and at times confused, the Philadelphia Eagles were overwhelmed yesterday by a 26-7 loss to the Cleveland Browns and the loss of middle linebacker Byron Evans for the rest of the year with a broken right leg."We lost a great player -- the quarterback of our defense," said linebacker William Thomas. "We've all got to step it up, pick it up."Against the Browns, the Eagles spent all game looking for something to pick them up -- but even when they found it, they threw it away.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | November 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- If misery loves company, Richie Petitbon and Rich Kotite should have a good visit today.When Petitbon's Washington Redskins and Kotite's Philadelphia Eagles meet at RFK Stadium, the two coaches can match each other injury for injury.Both teams' starting quarterbacks have been injured, both have been using patchwork offensive lines, both have been hurt by free-agent losses and both have endured long losing streaks."We're playing hard and scratching and so are the Redskins," Kotite said.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | November 9, 1992
PHILADELPHIA -- You think you've heard everything once, right? Well, get this: A team loses three of four games, changes quarterbacks and wins by three touchdowns, but the head coach immediately announces that the other quarterback, the one who was losing, has become the starter again.Does that make sense? Let's just put it this way: Are Philly fans known for their courtesy? No, it does not make an ounce of sense. But no one ever said the Philadelphia Eagles, the closest thing in the NFL to an episode of "Geraldo," ever make sense.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | November 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- If misery loves company, Richie Petitbon and Rich Kotite should have a good visit today.When Petitbon's Washington Redskins and Kotite's Philadelphia Eagles meet at RFK Stadium, the two coaches can match each other injury for injury.Both teams' starting quarterbacks have been injured, both have been using patchwork offensive lines, both have been hurt by free-agent losses and both have endured long losing streaks."We're playing hard and scratching and so are the Redskins," Kotite said.
SPORTS
By Stan Hochman and Stan Hochman,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 16, 1993
PHILADELPHIA -- So many guys patted Vaughn Hebron on the head, there's a slick, shiny spot on his helmet now.So many whispers in his ear, so many arms wrapped around his hunched shoulders, so many hang-in-theres, so many soft words of solace."
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | September 19, 1993
PHILADELPHIA -- The Philadelphia Eagles no longer talk about body bags and bounties."That was the last regime," coach Rich Kotite said last week. "I don't talk about body bags and things like that. I think that's ridiculous."Kotite, of course, doesn't have to identify the last regime.He was talking about Buddy Ryan, who has been gone from Philadelphia for three years, but still casts a large shadow over the franchise.When the wounded Washington Redskins play the Eagles at Veterans Stadium today, it will bring memories of the last time they went there without Mark Rypien as their starting quarterback.
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