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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 22, 1999
RAMBOUILLET, France -- With the Kosovo peace talks in limbo after ethnic Albanian delegates suddenly balked at the proposed deal, U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright stated yesterday that NATO would not bomb the Serbs if the Albanians also spurned a peace settlement. "If this fails because both parties say no, there will not be bombing of Serbia," Albright said after spending more than three hours with the ethnic Albanians. The Albanians have long argued that airstrikes were the best way to end the repression by the Serbs in Kosovo and to force them to a peace deal before tomorrow's deadline.
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NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 13, 1999
DJENERAL JANKOVIC, Yugoslavia -- The 15 members of the Kosovo Liberation Army came down out of the hills, walking at an easy gait, barely noticing the ransacked houses and smashed storefronts that the Serbs had left behind in this little town just across the border from Macedonia.They were met by the Royal Gurkha Rifles, a British army unit made up of volunteers from Nepal, who had crossed into Kosovo at 5: 07 a.m. yesterday, the vanguard of an international army that will in time add up to 48,000 soldiers.
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NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 24, 1999
WASHINGTON -- After 17 days of diplomacy marked by repeated American threats of force, Western nations suspended negotiations toward bringing peace to the Serbian province of Kosovo yesterday, failing to gain full agreement from either the Yugoslav government or the ethnic Albanians. Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright and her counterparts from Britain and France ended talks in Rambouillet, outside Paris, with a promise to hold a new conference March 15 somewhere in France.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 24, 1999
WASHINGTON -- After 17 days of diplomacy marked by repeated American threats of force, Western nations suspended negotiations toward bringing peace to the Serbian province of Kosovo yesterday, failing to gain full agreement from either the Yugoslav government or the ethnic Albanians. Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright and her counterparts from Britain and France ended talks in Rambouillet, outside Paris, with a promise to hold a new conference March 15 somewhere in France.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 13, 1999
DJENERAL JANKOVIC, Yugoslavia -- The 15 members of the Kosovo Liberation Army came down out of the hills, walking at an easy gait, barely noticing the ransacked houses and smashed storefronts that the Serbs had left behind in this little town just across the border from Macedonia.They were met by the Royal Gurkha Rifles, a British army unit made up of volunteers from Nepal, who had crossed into Kosovo at 5: 07 a.m. yesterday, the vanguard of an international army that will in time add up to 48,000 soldiers.
NEWS
June 25, 1999
Here are excerpts of reactions offered in the wake of peace returning to Kosovo by newspaper editorial pages here and abroad:Los Angeles Times -- NATO couldn't muster the political will to commit ground forces to the war over Kosovo and now it's having trouble deploying the soldiers who are needed there to keep the peace. As of Wednesday, fewer than half of the 50,000 Western troops assigned to KFOR -- Kosovo Force, the peacekeeping operation -- had arrived there. With all Serbian military and police forces now gone, a power vacuum exists that the guerrilla Kosovo Liberation Army has moved quickly to fill.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 9, 2005
PARIS - Prime Minister Ramush Haradinaj of Kosovo unexpectedly resigned yesterday and agreed to surrender to the United Nations war crimes tribunal in The Hague, which said it had indicted him for actions as a guerrilla commander fighting Serbian forces in the 1998-1999 war. Haradinaj's decision to step down and answer war crimes charges came as a shock in Kosovo, a Serbian province of close to a million people where he became prime minister in December...
NEWS
May 11, 2000
POWER-SHARING in a "devolved" government of Northern Ireland should be back, May 22. With it will come cross-border institutions linking both Irish states in practical matters, and British Isles arrangements putting Irish lawmakers in touch with British, Scots and Welsh counterparts. All that because the IRA found a design for disarmament -- previously "decommissioning" but now "deactivation" -- that meets its own scruples against surrender while making the gesture Unionists require. The IRA will show arms caches to two international inspectors: former President Martti Ahtisaari of Finland, who supervised disarmament of the Kosovo Liberation Army, and Cyril Ramaphosa, former secretary-general of the African National Congress, an old friend to the IRA. The IRA pledge that this will "initiate a process that will completely and verifiably put IRA arms beyond use," seems to promise effective disarmament in a year, or roughly a year behind schedule.
NEWS
June 22, 1999
THE peacekeeping operation in Kosovo began well. The agreement wrung out of the Kosovo Liberation Army removes the fear that it might turn on NATO forces. The agreement with Russia brings it on-board for a unified Kosovo where ethnic Albanians and Serbs will live in peace.Most of the harsh criticisms of Clinton administration policy are being proven untrue within days of their utterance. Meanwhile, the atrocities committed by Serbian authorities against ethnic Albanians that are being discovered exceed the predictions and vindicate the NATO bombing that made Serbia stop.
NEWS
February 26, 1999
AFTER 17 days and a partial agreement in the Kosovo negotiations, nothing is assured.If the Yugoslav army and Albanian rebels don't renew fighting before the March 15 resumption of negotiations in France; if President Slobodan Milosevic of Serbia accepts a NATO peace-keeping force in Kosovo; if Albanian extremists settle without a guarantee of sovereignty, and if Congress allows a few thousand U.S. troops among 30,000 NATO troops on the ground -- then the...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 22, 1999
RAMBOUILLET, France -- With the Kosovo peace talks in limbo after ethnic Albanian delegates suddenly balked at the proposed deal, U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright stated yesterday that NATO would not bomb the Serbs if the Albanians also spurned a peace settlement. "If this fails because both parties say no, there will not be bombing of Serbia," Albright said after spending more than three hours with the ethnic Albanians. The Albanians have long argued that airstrikes were the best way to end the repression by the Serbs in Kosovo and to force them to a peace deal before tomorrow's deadline.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 8, 1998
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- Senior U.S. envoys sought yesterday to step up the pressure on Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic to call off his offensive against ethnic Albanian guerrillas in the breakaway Kosovo province.John Shattuck, assistant secretary of state for human rights, and former Sen. Bob Dole of Kansas told a Belgrade news conference that in a weekend visit to Kosovo, they witnessed an unfolding human disaster.Yesterday they pressed Milosevic to allow Red Cross visits to detained men suspected of being guerrillas and to allow outside experts to investigate allegations of atrocities by both sides.
NEWS
March 22, 2001
THE WEAKEST OF the successor states to the former Yugoslavia, Macedonia has in its decade of existence avoided the bloody traumas of the others. Until now. NATO peace-keepers in Kosovo need to police the border better to prevent arms from reaching the ethnic Albanian insurgents in Macedonia. The United States should make clear it is not leaving the area before peace prevails. Intervention in Macedonia itself, though called for by Russian President Vladimir V. Putin, is not an issue. Macedonia has not sought it. The fighting is brought by two small groups that have only recently appeared inside the country; one is an extension of the guerrilla Kosovo Liberation Army.
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