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NEWS
March 28, 1998
THE CONTACT group of six powers gave a weak ultimatum to Serbian leader Slobodan Milosevic to end repression of the Albanian majority in Kosovo province: End brutality in a month or the world community would impose sanctions specified in an earlier ultimatum.Mr. Milosevic was not impressed. He gives in only to credible threats. In this case, the resolve of the United States and Britain were not enough to overcome the resistance of Russia, France, Germany and Italy.A let-up of police repression and talks with the shadow Albanian government in Kosovo might defuse the crisis.
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SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | October 17, 2008
Sirens blare, bombs whistle toward their targets and the earth convulses with the shock of war. At night, as he sleeps, the past haunts Milos Kocic. Nine years later, the Kosovo War plays out, time and again, in the mind of Kocic, 23, the Serbian-born goalkeeper for Loyola College's high-flying soccer team. The nightmare, he said, is often the same: "I'm 14 again and playing soccer with friends in our yard in Leskovac. We hear the [NATO] planes coming to drop their bombs. I hear the screams of my mom to 'come back home,' but I can never get there.
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NEWS
By MARC GROSSMAN | November 28, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Kosovo is the biggest remaining Balkan challenge. For the past three years, America and its allies have hoped that an undefined future status for Kosovo would be the incentive needed to encourage best practices and best behavior from Kosovo Albanians and Serbs. This policy - right for its time - has run its course. The incentives need to change because only a clear path to earned independence for Kosovo will produce stability in the Balkans. There will be no further progress on the key issues in Kosovo until there is clarity about Kosovo's future.
NEWS
April 4, 2008
Ex-Kosovo leader acquitted by U.N. PARIS --The United Nations tribunal for the former Yugoslavia acquitted Ramush Haradinaj, former prime minister of Kosovo, of all charges of war crimes and crimes against humanity, in a surprise decision yesterday. Judges found that prosecutors had failed to prove a deliberate campaign to kill Serb civilians in Kosovo or expel them in the late 1990s, when Haradinaj led the Kosovo Liberation Army against Serbian security Forces. The tribunal also acquitted one of two other defendants, Idriz Balaj.
NEWS
June 25, 1999
Here are excerpts of reactions offered in the wake of peace returning to Kosovo by newspaper editorial pages here and abroad:Los Angeles Times -- NATO couldn't muster the political will to commit ground forces to the war over Kosovo and now it's having trouble deploying the soldiers who are needed there to keep the peace. As of Wednesday, fewer than half of the 50,000 Western troops assigned to KFOR -- Kosovo Force, the peacekeeping operation -- had arrived there. With all Serbian military and police forces now gone, a power vacuum exists that the guerrilla Kosovo Liberation Army has moved quickly to fill.
NEWS
January 25, 2007
Tomorrow the Balkans come back into play. The immediate issue is the future of Kosovo, which has spent more than seven years now as an ill-defined international protectorate - to the dismay of Kosovar Albanians, who want independence, and of Serbs, who long to have the province back under their control. A larger question has to do with the continuing aftershocks from the collapse of European communism. The U.N. special envoy for Kosovo is to present his long-awaited plan for the province's future to the six-nation Contact Group tomorrow in Vienna.
NEWS
By GORDON N. BARDOS | December 14, 2005
Today marks the official signing of the Dayton peace accords that ended the Bosnian war a decade ago. That the agreement has lasted this long suggests there is much that can be learned from Dayton as international negotiators begin work on the next challenge for establishing long-term peace in the Balkans: the talks over Kosovo's future status. Much of Dayton's success lies in its ability to reconcile the idealism of preserving a multiethnic state with the political reality of a war-torn, ethnically divided society.
NEWS
January 18, 1999
Survivors: Ethnic Albanians mourn relatives yesterday in the village of Racak, where at least 45 Albanians were massacred Friday by Serbian paramilitary police. Fighting flared again yesterday as the War Crimes Tribunal prepared to investigate. (Article, Page 9A)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | May 30, 1999
Fine art and classical music -- not exactly what you expect to find at the Fells Point bar Bohager's. But it was the setting for a benefit for Kosovo refugees. Two quartets of Baltimore Symphony Orchestra musicians, and 12-year-old violinist Wei-wei Wang, were among those who serenaded an audience of 200, who also perused and purchased the work of 50 Maryland artists.A moving moment came when Dr. Drew Fuller, an emergency physician at St. Joseph Medical Center, spoke about his recent volunteer stint, working at a Macedonia refugee camp for Doctors of the World, a humanitarian medical relief organization.
NEWS
By George F. Will | March 28, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Some of America's sophisticated military assets are in the Balkan skies, perhaps illustrating the problem of having the best ladder at the wrong wall. Still, Senate Democrats have become bellicose.Most of them opposed the gulf war, fought in response to an unambiguous violation of international law and in defense of vital U.S. political and economic interests in a strategically crucial region. During the climactic stage of the Cold War, many Democrats opposed aid to the Contras fighting a dictatorship aligned with Moscow.
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,Los Angeles Times | February 14, 2008
MOSCOW -- Kosovo's looming independence, and promises of quick U.S. and European recognition, have undercut and infuriated Russia at a moment when this oil-rich behemoth is eager to show that its global clout has been restored, analysts say. Russian officials have spent weeks issuing dire assessments of the U.N.-administered province's pending declaration of independence from Serbia, expected to be announced this weekend. The Russians have repeatedly derided Kosovo's possible change in status as a "Pandora's box" that will destabilize Europe by setting off a chain reaction of shifting borders.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun reporter | February 10, 2008
After the band had played, the politicians had spoken and the 180 returning members of the Maryland National Guard had been recognized for serving their country overseas at yesterday's "Freedom Salute" welcome home ceremony, it was 3-year-old Evelyn Joseph who took to the stage and received some of the day's loudest applause. Evelyn, in a red dress, white tights and pigtails, walked on stage at Loch Raven High School with her mother, Petronella Henry-Joseph, who received an award for heading up one of the National Guard's family-readiness units.
NEWS
December 13, 2007
Kosovo is slouching toward independence - a formal declaration may come before the end of the month - and that's going to require diplomatic attention and cool judgment on the part of the United States and its European allies. Kosovo, once independent, could explode (and set off a detonation in nearby Bosnia among ethnic Serbs there), but this is by no means inevitable. What is more likely to happen is that the Serbs in Kosovo's northern slice, already essentially run by Serbia, will reinforce their links to Belgrade.
NEWS
By John Menzies and Marshall Harris | December 9, 2007
Tomorrow, the United States, the European Union and Russia will report to the United Nations on the latest round of talks on the future of Kosovo. They will be tempted yet again to delay resolution of the Kosovo question - even after three years of talks. On its face, the new report will be largely meaningless. The most recent talks were no more than a sop to Serbia and Russia. Positions have not changed, compromise has not been reached, and agreement remains a fatuous hope. Kosovo is determined to exercise its political self-determination by pursuing internationally recognized sovereignty and independence.
NEWS
December 3, 2007
Since the Kosovo problem began back in 1912, 1981, 1989 or 1998 (take your pick), no one would - or should - be foolish enough to predict that we are now entering the Kosovo endgame. However, it is clear that one chapter in this tortuous story is closing and a new one opening. Beginning today in the Austrian spa of Baden, Serbian and Kosovo Albanian leaders are meeting for one last time under the aegis of the Troika of mediators from the U.S., Russia and the European Union. No one expects any significant results.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | July 27, 2007
CHICAGO -- During the Democratic debate in South Carolina, I heard something I never expected to hear: Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton coming out against U.S. military intervention. At least I think she was coming out against U.S. military intervention. Asked if U.S. troops should be sent to Darfur, the New York Democrat made a valiant effort to dodge the question by declaiming about sanctions, divestment and U.N. peacekeepers. But when pressed, "How about American troops on the ground?" she finally said, a bit awkwardly, "American ground troops I don't think belong in Darfur at this time."
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | April 23, 1999
NEW YORK -- The Kosovo down payment is only $6 billion. Or so the White House told Congress this week.Of course, to be fair, there is no way yet to calculate the cost of rebuilding what we are now destroying. We don't even know how long we will be destroying from on high -- or even if our troops will hit the ground in a parody of D-Day.Why not? All the other World War II words and names we are using to explain Kosovo are parody, beginning with Hitler and Holocaust. To rationalize this turkey shoot, we trivialize the big one.The most striking use of war-movie language these grim days is "passes" -- as in our fighters making several passes over Kosovo roads to spot the bad guys.
NEWS
July 13, 2007
Time's up. Serbian politicians will never agree to an independent Kosovo. So Kosovo will just have to become independent without their consent. For eight years now, ever since the NATO air war drove Serbian forces out, Kosovo has been in limbo. The Kosovar Albanians want sovereignty, and the U.S. and the European Union - albeit with serious qualms - have decided there is no alternative. But they've been trying to jolly the Serbs along, to entice them to recognize that Kosovo is lost to them.
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