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NEWS
November 15, 2006
As if the world needed another crisis, Kosovo is moving onto the front burner. For seven years, it has been an ill-defined - and relatively ill-run - international protectorate, but now time has run out. The Kosovar Albanians were promised that the United Nations would devise a final status for their territory by the end of this year, and the implication was that it would include a formal severing of ties with Serbia. The U.N. has put off that determination until the end of January, in an effort not to inflame Serbian parliamentary elections.
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NEWS
December 13, 2007
Kosovo is slouching toward independence - a formal declaration may come before the end of the month - and that's going to require diplomatic attention and cool judgment on the part of the United States and its European allies. Kosovo, once independent, could explode (and set off a detonation in nearby Bosnia among ethnic Serbs there), but this is by no means inevitable. What is more likely to happen is that the Serbs in Kosovo's northern slice, already essentially run by Serbia, will reinforce their links to Belgrade.
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NEWS
January 25, 2007
Tomorrow the Balkans come back into play. The immediate issue is the future of Kosovo, which has spent more than seven years now as an ill-defined international protectorate - to the dismay of Kosovar Albanians, who want independence, and of Serbs, who long to have the province back under their control. A larger question has to do with the continuing aftershocks from the collapse of European communism. The U.N. special envoy for Kosovo is to present his long-awaited plan for the province's future to the six-nation Contact Group tomorrow in Vienna.
NEWS
July 13, 2007
Time's up. Serbian politicians will never agree to an independent Kosovo. So Kosovo will just have to become independent without their consent. For eight years now, ever since the NATO air war drove Serbian forces out, Kosovo has been in limbo. The Kosovar Albanians want sovereignty, and the U.S. and the European Union - albeit with serious qualms - have decided there is no alternative. But they've been trying to jolly the Serbs along, to entice them to recognize that Kosovo is lost to them.
NEWS
December 13, 2007
Kosovo is slouching toward independence - a formal declaration may come before the end of the month - and that's going to require diplomatic attention and cool judgment on the part of the United States and its European allies. Kosovo, once independent, could explode (and set off a detonation in nearby Bosnia among ethnic Serbs there), but this is by no means inevitable. What is more likely to happen is that the Serbs in Kosovo's northern slice, already essentially run by Serbia, will reinforce their links to Belgrade.
NEWS
July 13, 2007
Time's up. Serbian politicians will never agree to an independent Kosovo. So Kosovo will just have to become independent without their consent. For eight years now, ever since the NATO air war drove Serbian forces out, Kosovo has been in limbo. The Kosovar Albanians want sovereignty, and the U.S. and the European Union - albeit with serious qualms - have decided there is no alternative. But they've been trying to jolly the Serbs along, to entice them to recognize that Kosovo is lost to them.
NEWS
January 1, 2003
THERE'S A certain kind of Democrat who wants to have nothing whatsoever to do with Bill Clinton. Al Gore and a few more recent candidates come to mind - but just look where it got them. It only goes to show that ingratitude is its own reward, or something like that. Here's a different take on the former president: In the heart of Pristina, the capital of Kosovo, there is a 40-foot-tall portrait of Bill Clinton, and it overlooks Bill Clinton Boulevard. In Kosovo, they haven't forgotten the man who drove out the Serbs, and they're not ashamed to say so. Theirs is a country - let's face it - where the heroically named avenues were once dominated by huge portraits of steely-eyed Yugoslav Communists or an idealized and granite-jawed Vladimir Lenin, so they know something about gigantic art in the public service, but now they've got Bill, as twinkly-eyed and as round-jawed and, yes, as unideal as they come.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1999
WASHINGTON -- After the bombing, then what?NATO officials hope that once cruise missiles and bombs "degrade" the Yugoslav army, President Slobodan Milosevic will see the error of his judgment and agree to the Western-drafted peace plan that he has rejected for weeks.That would open the way for the entry of 28,000 peacekeepers, including 4,000 Americans, to enforce the agreement, protect civilians and ensure an autonomous -- but not independent -- Serbian province of Kosovo.No one can guarantee this outcome, and the Clinton administration has said little about what might follow bombing if Milosevic persists in his refusal to accept a plan that includes NATO forces on Serbian soil.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 30, 1999
WASHINGTON -- As the flood of ethnic Albanian refugees from Kosovo inundated neighboring countries, President Clinton faced mounting political and diplomatic pressure yesterday to consider sending ground troops to quell the slaughter in the Serbian province. White House aides insist that NATO's military objective -- to grind down Yugoslavia's war-fighting capability -- can be achieved from the air and that ground troops are not even being discussed. But a NATO diplomat, speaking on condition of anonymity, said long-standing contingency plans are constantly being reviewed.
NEWS
February 26, 2002
FOR THE SAKE of argument, let's forget for a moment about achieving justice. From a strictly practical point of view, will the war-crimes trial of Slobodan Milosevic make things worse in the Balkans? Plenty of Serbs think so. And, with the trial barely two weeks old, so do a growing number of those who worry that reconciliation may never gain a foothold in the former Yugoslavia. Their reasoning goes like this: Mr. Milosevic is doing a surprisingly effective job of defending himself, skillfully playing into Serbs' resentments and fears that the whole world is against them.
NEWS
January 25, 2007
Tomorrow the Balkans come back into play. The immediate issue is the future of Kosovo, which has spent more than seven years now as an ill-defined international protectorate - to the dismay of Kosovar Albanians, who want independence, and of Serbs, who long to have the province back under their control. A larger question has to do with the continuing aftershocks from the collapse of European communism. The U.N. special envoy for Kosovo is to present his long-awaited plan for the province's future to the six-nation Contact Group tomorrow in Vienna.
NEWS
November 15, 2006
As if the world needed another crisis, Kosovo is moving onto the front burner. For seven years, it has been an ill-defined - and relatively ill-run - international protectorate, but now time has run out. The Kosovar Albanians were promised that the United Nations would devise a final status for their territory by the end of this year, and the implication was that it would include a formal severing of ties with Serbia. The U.N. has put off that determination until the end of January, in an effort not to inflame Serbian parliamentary elections.
NEWS
January 1, 2003
THERE'S A certain kind of Democrat who wants to have nothing whatsoever to do with Bill Clinton. Al Gore and a few more recent candidates come to mind - but just look where it got them. It only goes to show that ingratitude is its own reward, or something like that. Here's a different take on the former president: In the heart of Pristina, the capital of Kosovo, there is a 40-foot-tall portrait of Bill Clinton, and it overlooks Bill Clinton Boulevard. In Kosovo, they haven't forgotten the man who drove out the Serbs, and they're not ashamed to say so. Theirs is a country - let's face it - where the heroically named avenues were once dominated by huge portraits of steely-eyed Yugoslav Communists or an idealized and granite-jawed Vladimir Lenin, so they know something about gigantic art in the public service, but now they've got Bill, as twinkly-eyed and as round-jawed and, yes, as unideal as they come.
NEWS
February 26, 2002
FOR THE SAKE of argument, let's forget for a moment about achieving justice. From a strictly practical point of view, will the war-crimes trial of Slobodan Milosevic make things worse in the Balkans? Plenty of Serbs think so. And, with the trial barely two weeks old, so do a growing number of those who worry that reconciliation may never gain a foothold in the former Yugoslavia. Their reasoning goes like this: Mr. Milosevic is doing a surprisingly effective job of defending himself, skillfully playing into Serbs' resentments and fears that the whole world is against them.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber, and Bill Glauber,,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 19, 2000
BELA CRVKA, Yugoslavia -- The father cannot forget the photographs rescued from a shallow grave. In his leathery hands, he carefully holds a precious album of pictures retrieved from an undeveloped roll of film discovered in his youngest son's clothing. He sees his two teen-age boys, alive and well, in the days before war came to this isolated Kosovo village and Serbian gunners killed 64 people. "I think, every day, it gets harder for me," says the father who buried two sons twice, on a moonlit spring night and a sweltering summer day -- first, right after a massacre, and the second time after the bodies were exhumed for war crimes investigators.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 23, 1999
PODUJEVO, Yugoslavia -- Badgered, taunted and half-starved, thousands of refugees in northern Kosovo were rounded up by Serbian soldiers and paramilitaries, marched from place to place for three weeks, and then herded into a cluster of villages where they remained captives for two months.Many of the Kosovar Albanians were apparently shot along the way -- including pregnant women and young children -- picked out of the line of marchers and left for dead by the roadside.Returning to their burned-out homes yesterday, survivors were still trying to make sense of the random and pointless nature of their experience at the hands of the Serbs.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Jonathan Weisman and Tom Bowman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 30, 1999
WASHINGTON -- With mounting accounts of atrocities in Kosovo, NATO aircraft and naval vessels yesterday focused more of their firepower on military sites in the beleaguered province, aiming at those Serbian forces responsible for the widespread killings of Kosovar Albanians."
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 25, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Even as the missiles were raining down on Serbia, President Clinton pressed the case last night for military intervention in Kosovo, telling a divided nation and a skeptical Congress that the country and its NATO allies had no choice but to prevent a massacre "on NATO's doorstep."Speaking from the Oval Office, the president warned Americans of the risks to U.S. forces. But he said a sustained, punishing air campaign in defense of a little-known province about the size of Maryland is in the United States' vital interests.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 21, 1999
MITROVICA, Yugoslavia -- As Yugoslav forces completed their withdrawal from Kosovo yesterday, as the last Serb soldiers pulled over the border, they left in their wake an untold number of unresolved questions.Will the Serbian residents of Mitrovica, for instance, continue to stand defiant at the bridge over the Ibar River, carving out for themselves an enclave in the city?Will anyone ever know what happened to those men who survived the massacre at Studima, but have since vanished?And what is to become of the lead and zinc mine at Stari Trg?
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 15, 1999
KACANIK, Yugoslavia -- The graves lie in a cemetery behind a gasoline station, mounds of dirt marked with 81 plain wooden stakes.Nobody really knows how many people were buried in this place, or how they died, or who they all were. But in the abandoned landscape that is Kosovo, where rumor mixes with fact, the area marks what could be the first massacre burial site uncovered by international peacekeeping forces in this Serbian province.The world's news media descended upon this place yesterday, trying to document what allegedly occurred April 9, when Yugoslav military forces and Serbian police swept through this region that was a stronghold for the ethnic Albanian guerrilla force, the Kosovo Liberation Army.
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