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By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | July 25, 2007
I see hosts on cooking shows who specify kosher salt or sea salt. I thought salt was salt. Is there a difference? As far as the composition of salt goes, there isn't a difference. Sodium chloride is sodium chloride. The main differences are texture, grain size and source. Table salt is mined and usually contains calcium silicate to keep it from clumping. Iodized salt has a little iodine, to keep your thyroid healthy. Sea salt can be made from evaporated seawater or mined from rock salt.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2013
The season's chilly weather calls for comfort food, but that's no reason to pack on the pounds. After all, spring is right around the corner. We asked local chefs to share their comfort food favorites, lightened up a bit in honor of the season ahead. Many of our chefs gravitated toward seafood, and some added fresh vegetables and herbs. Eat and enjoy! Cyrus Keefer Birroteca 1520 Clipper Road, Baltimore 443-708-1934 bmorebirroteca.com "I've always found pasta comforting," says Cyrus Keefer.
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FEATURES
By Steve Petusevsky and Steve Petusevsky,FORT LAUDERDALE SUN-SENTINEL | January 31, 1996
Everyone's mother always has a favorite recipe that is appropriate for all occasions. My mother's is an eggplant mixture called caponata.You can use caponata as a dip, sandwich filling with mozzarella or Provolone cheese on top and then baked, or as a pizza topping, omelet filling or pasta sauce.CaponataMakes 6 servings2 medium unpeeled eggplants, washed and cut into 1/2 -inch dice (2 1/2 pounds total)1 tablespoon kosher salt, for soaking3 tablespoons pure olive oil1 medium onion, chopped5 stalks celery, chopped3 cloves garlic, minced1 (3-ounce)
NEWS
By Sandra Pinckney | October 12, 2008
Autumn is my favorite time of year. I love the changing leaves, the cool temperatures, decorating with pumpkins and having a wide variety of vegetables in season. Root vegetables like squash, rutabagas, turnips, carrots, sweet potatoes and beets are all at their peak now. They not only are plentiful, but are powerhouses of nutrients. Take beets, for instance. They are loaded with iron, potassium, calcium and zinc. I know beets don't make it on most lists of favorite foods, but I grew up eating them.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | March 15, 1995
Q: Why can't you refreeze raw meat?A: According to advisers with the meat and poultry hot line run by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, raw meat can be refrozen if the meat has been thawed slowly in the refrigerator and has not remained thawed for longer than 24 hours.Q: Can fresh bananas be dehydrated?A: Fresh bananas can be dehydrated as can many other fruits. Fruits can be sun-dried if you live in a hot, low-humidity climate where temperatures are above 90 degrees for many days. Given Baltimore's humid weather, the oven is probably a better choice.
FEATURES
By Molly Abraham and Molly Abraham,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 21, 1993
A friend once ruined an expensive dress when she tried to eat a tough, slippery duck. As she struggled to dissect the bird, it slid off her plate and onto her lap, leaving a permanent grease trail.That anecdote illustrates one of duck's biggest problems and oldest myths: Nothing is worse than a poorly cooked duck, which is always greasy and fatty.Yes and no, says Melicia Phillips, author of the cookbook "Working a Duck" (Doubleday, $25).Ms. Phillips, who lives in Brooklyn, N.Y., and works as a sous-chef in Manhattan, hopes her book will help home chefs cook delicious duck and dispel the myth of fat."
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | June 10, 2006
My book club regularly meets monthly at 4 p.m. on a weekend afternoon, but for June we have changed to a weeknight. It's now my turn to host, and I have been in a quandary about what to serve. For afternoons, we have fallen into an easy pattern of appetizers and wine, or desserts and coffee. But our weeknight meeting at 6:30 p.m. is dinnertime, so I need to prepare something more substantial. The problem is that I have a huge cooking class the night before and only a few hours free for shopping and cooking the day of our meeting.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | June 14, 1998
Over the years, I have given fancy dinners that took days or weeks to plan and execute. Today, simple and uncomplicated entertaining is what I enjoy most.This past weekend, for example, my husband and I phoned a couple on Saturday morning to suggest going to a movie and then coming to our house for supper afterward. They loved the idea and even offered to bring dessert.I looked around to see what might be turned into a menu and found boneless chicken breasts, which could be marinated and then rubbed with a mixture of rosemary, fennel seeds, black pepper and kosher salt before grilling.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | May 19, 2002
When Memorial Day arrives in late May, bringing warm temperatures, it marks a change in the way I cook and entertain. We open our sun porch, clean all the dusty furniture and set out potted plants. My husband rolls out the grill from the garage, scrubs its grate and rushes off to the store for a season's supply of charcoal. I start to weed and water my herb garden. At last I can move my cooking to the back yard and plan meals that can be eaten there. Our first official "grill meal" of the season takes place on this holiday weekend, and this year I can't wait to try some new creations along with some old-time favorites.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 25, 1998
Having just returned from a short stay in Italy, my mind is teeming with memories of the glorious foods I sampled while across the Atlantic.The dishes I savored were both extraordinarily simple to prepare and at the same time incredibly delicious.Back in my own kitchen, I've been busy duplicating some of the specialties I liked best.I've included two of my favorites here -- carrot ribbons cooked in cream, and golden potatoes with garlic and rosemary from a family restaurant, Lancellotti, in the town of Soliera.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | January 12, 2008
My friends all love to entertain, but, like me, they work full time and are often dealing with frenetic schedules. The solution for all of us has become the "planned potluck." We have found that discussing the menu and delegating who will be responsible for the main course, the sides and the dessert make for a winning formula. In our circle, the person who hosts usually prepares the entree, and the rest of us bring other fare to complete the meal. As soon as I accepted a recent invitation, I volunteered to make a side dish.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | January 2, 2008
American Masala By Suvir Saran with Raquel Pelzel Tangy Tart Hot & Sweet By Padma Lakshmi Weinstein Books / 2007 / $34.95 Although Padma Lakshmi also hails from India, Tangy Tart Hot & Sweet is less an homage to the author's ethnic roots than a tasting tour of her favorite international flavors. In fact, it's fair to say that the book, whose recipes hopscotch the globe, is really a celebration of Lakshmi, the model, author and actress best known as the host of Bravo's Top Chef. The 265-page book is liberally seasoned with her pictures.
NEWS
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,Tribune Media Services | August 5, 2007
On the first night my husband and I spent in Paris this summer, we unpacked our bags and headed out for supper. Tired from traveling, we ended up in a small Left Bank place that specializes in pizza and pasta. I was tempted by one of the day's specials listed on a blackboard --penne with fresh tomato sauce, arugula and parmesan. When I arrived back home several weeks later, I prepared a version that was close to the original. This simple main course does not take long to prepare, so it's ideal to use for warm weather entertaining when you want to minimize your time in the kitchen.
NEWS
By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | July 25, 2007
I see hosts on cooking shows who specify kosher salt or sea salt. I thought salt was salt. Is there a difference? As far as the composition of salt goes, there isn't a difference. Sodium chloride is sodium chloride. The main differences are texture, grain size and source. Table salt is mined and usually contains calcium silicate to keep it from clumping. Iodized salt has a little iodine, to keep your thyroid healthy. Sea salt can be made from evaporated seawater or mined from rock salt.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | July 1, 2007
This soup is like guacamole in a bowl. The tomato salsa garnish is essential to the recipe, for it highlights the subtle taste of the avocados. Although this soup can easily kick off a summer supper, it could also step into the role of a main course. You could serve it as is or make it more substantial by adding a garnish of grilled skewered shrimp to each bowl. Chilled Avocado Soup Garnished With Fresh Tomato Salsa Serves 6 SALSA: 2 cups diced tomatoes (6 to 8 plum tomatoes), with seeds and membranes removed and discarded, cut into 1/2 -inch pieces 1 cup finely chopped onion 1 1/2 tablespoons minced jalapeno pepper (about one 3-inch pepper, with seeds and membranes discarded)
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun reporter | June 27, 2007
The Flexitarian Table By Peter Berley with Zoe Singer Vegetables By the Culinary Institute of America Lebhar-Friedman Books / 2007 / $40 Vegetables, the latest cookbook offering from the Culinary Institute of America, is a beautifully illustrated compendium of recipes chock-full of vegetables. It is not strictly vegetarian, but it celebrates vegetables and legumes. Besides basic information (what is bok choy) and advice (how to trim an artichoke bottom), it includes delightful dishes such as fennel-and-potato chowder and hazelnut romesco sauce (to accompany grilled vegetables)
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | April 14, 2002
After our long, cold winter with its short, often gray days, everyone in New England welcomes the arrival of spring. I look forward to the new produce that arrives in our markets, and to being able to set up our grill in the backyard once again. One spring menu that I am planning to serve soon will begin with bowls of light cream of watercress soup, followed by grilled sesame flank steaks garnished with grilled green onions. Steamed peas and gingered carrots will accompany the meat, and an almond cake with sliced strawberries and whipped cream will end the dinner.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA and LAURA VOZZELLA,SUN REPORTER | April 12, 2006
Chef Interrupted Delicious Chefs' Recipes That You Can Actually Make at Home Gordon Ramsay Makes It Easy By Gordon Ramsay John Wiley & Sons / 2005 / $24.95 The star of the Fox television show Hell's Kitchen tells us home cooking can be heavenly. Some recipes -- Banana and Passion Fruit Smoothie or Toasted Bagel With Serrano Ham and Broiled Tomatoes -- can be accomplished by anyone with a toaster or blender. There is more sophisticated fare, too, such as Scallops in Prosciutto With Monkfish and Rosemary.
NEWS
By SANDRA PINCKNEY | June 3, 2007
My grandparents had a simple recipe for family cookouts: Serve lots of food mixed with lots of laughter, with as many family members and friends around the table as possible. I can never recall a time when we ran out of food, or things to laugh about, or when family or friends were not welcomed with open arms. If you polled my family about those golden days, Granddaddy's Cameen chicken would top the favorite foods list -- a crispy, succulent, bursting-with-flavor fried chicken that smelled as good as it tasted.
NEWS
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,Newsday | January 17, 2007
What, I wondered, would be some good New Year's resolutions for readers to adopt? First, some simple upgrades: salt, pepper and canned tomatoes. If you are using regular iodized table salt, buy a box of Diamond Crystal kosher salt (which has a milder, cleaner taste) and designate a small bowl as your new "salt cellar." Keep the bowl near the stove and get into the habit of salting while you cook - you'll wind up adding less salt at the table. You also might want to invest in a fancy "finishing" salt such as French fleur du sel or English Maldon sea salt.
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