Advertisement
HomeCollectionsKorean War
IN THE NEWS

Korean War

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2010
James M. Cannon, a neophyte Sun reporter at the time, was remembering the other day how he pulled off a coup 60 years ago that freed him forever from the daily drudgery of local reporting and left his newsroom colleagues smarting with envy and wondering why they hadn't been so forward. The Korean War began on June 25, 1950, when communist North Korean forces swept into the Republic of South Korea, and a day later, Cannon made his own invasion of sorts. He screwed up his courage and walked into the small office of Bill Perkinson, assistant to Neil H. Swanson, who was the fearsome, no-nonsense executive editor of the Sunpapers, and asked to be sent to Korea.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2014
Otis M. "Jim" Long, a retired Maryland state trooper who survived the sinking of his aircraft carrier during World War II, died Thursday at Harbor Hospital of complications from a fall. He was 87. The son of Nathaniel O. Long and Vera M. Long, Otis Melrose Long, who was known as Jim, was born in Birmingham, Ala., and raised in Richmond, Va. He was a student at John Marshall High School in Richmond, when he withdrew his senior year to enlist in the Navy. He later earned his General Education Development diploma.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 20, 1995
A monument dedicated to eight Carroll County men who died in the Korean War will be dedicated at 2 p.m. Sunday in Memorial Gardens behind City Hall.The monument was donated by Joseph L. Mathias Monuments in Westminster.When it is dedicated, all county residents who died in World War I, World War II, Korea and Vietnam will be recognized by name at City Hall or in the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Garden.The eight county men who lost their lives in the Korean War were: Sgt. Charles L. Billingslea Jr., Pfc. Charles A. Chew, Pfc. Louis A. Damewood, Pvt. William H. Dotson, Sgt. Leslie L. Fairchild, Pfc. Charles E. Garver, Pfc. Harold E. Lugenbeel and Sgt. 1st Class Virgil Stambaugh.
NEWS
By Patrick Cha | July 30, 2014
Maryland native Joseph Gantt joined the Army at 18, serving with distinction as a Sergeant First Class in the South Pacific during World War II, even though the military segregated him because of the color of his skin. Gantt had redeployed to the front lines of Korea in December 1950 as a field medic with the 2nd Infantry Division when his unit was overrun by enemy forces. Gantt was thrown into a prison camp and reportedly died there in March 1951. But his wife, Clara Gantt, refused to lose faith.
NEWS
By ROSALIE M. FALTER | July 31, 1995
Bill List, one of our own Linthicum neighbors, was part of last week's ceremonies to commemorate the Korean War. It happened somewhat by chance. Three years ago he learned that the Navy was naming a ship after one he served on during the war. One thing led to another for this veteran who ended up at the dedication of the Korean War Memorial in Washington.Call 437-4120 or 923-2655 by Wednesday to reserve a space.*New Orleans-style music will be featured at the next Concert in the Park, scheduled for 6 p.m. Sunday in Linthicum Park.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2003
Norman Charles Craig, a Marine who fought in the Korean War, died in his sleep Monday at his West Baltimore home. He was 73. Born and raised in West Baltimore, Mr. Craig graduated in 1949 from Frederick Douglass High School, where he had been a member of the school's boxing team. He enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1951 and, after completing basic training, was sent into combat with the 1st Marine Division in Korea. During his tenure in Korea, Mr. Craig participated in some of the most furious fighting of the war, including the assault on Pork Chop Hill.
SPORTS
By VITO STELLINO | July 30, 1995
For Arizona Cardinals coach Buddy Ryan, there will be special meaning to the team's trip to Washington for the season opener Sept. 3 against the Redskins.Not because it's the opener, or that the Cardinals are seeking their third consecutive victory at RFK Stadium.What's special is that it will be Ryan's first chance to visit the new Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington.It's not the forgotten war for Ryan. He fought in it as a teen-ager, and the memories are still vivid.Ryan, who usually doesn't leave his hotel room on the road except to go to the stadium for the game, visited the Vietnam Veterans Memorial last year when the team was in Washington.
NEWS
By Marc LeGoff and Marc LeGoff,Staff writer | July 28, 1991
At 14, an age when most boys' biggest concern is making the junior varsity baseball team, Allan Stover served aboard the Coast Guard cutter Basswood during the closing months of the Korean War.Stover, then a "semi-rebellious" Cleveland teen-ager who lived with his divorced mother, lied to the Coast Guard recruiting office about his age, intercepted the parental waiver forms sent through the mail and reported to boot camp in January 1953.Eager to share his experiences with others like him, Stover, 53, of Ellicott City, has founded the Veterans of Underage Military Service.
NEWS
June 23, 2006
Jerome P. Offutt, a retired electrical worker and decorated Korean War veteran, died of renal cell cancer June 15 at Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center & Hospital. The longtime Randallstown resident was 75. Mr. Offutt was born in Baltimore and raised on Morley Street. He was a 1948 graduate of Mount St. Joseph High School and enlisted in the Army in 1951. A member of an artillery unit, Mr. Offutt saw combat in Korea. He was awarded two Bronze Stars and attained the rank of corporal. He returned to Baltimore and went to work in 1953 for Westinghouse Electric Corp.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | September 23, 2007
The Coldest Winter America and the Korean War By David Halberstam Hyperion / 736 pages / $35 The Korean War was a tragedy of errors. It began because Secretary of State Dean Acheson removed Korea from the defensive perimeter of the United States. Convinced that America would not intervene, the Soviet Union approved the plan of Kim Il Sung to attack South Korea. President Harry S. Truman then sent U.S. troops to the divided nation, under a United Nations mandate agreed to at a meeting boycotted by the Russians.
NEWS
by Louise Vest | January 28, 2014
January 1965 Ice escapades Times notes: "Ice skating has become the winter sport for Donleigh, now that the frozen flooded (purposely) field near the swimming pool offers a close, perfect opportunity. Several adults as well as children were seen having a ball last week. Among those enjoying the nippy pastime were Allen, David and Vincent Short, and Mrs. Helen Short; Mr. Richard Wiseman, Mr. Tom Jones, Kathleen and Ellen Bailey, Debbie, Susan and Phillip Plaskowitz, and Mrs. Jacqueline Gray.
NEWS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2014
Abraham Dash, a retired Air Force lieutenant colonel and federal attorney who taught at the University of Maryland school of law from 1970 until his death, died Jan. 12 of a heart attack at his home in Bowie. He was 86. News of his death prompted an outpouring from former students and colleagues, who posted online dozens of tributes to his teaching, counsel and courtly spirit. "There's little if anything left unsaid about Abe. And yet anyone who knew him would want to be a part of these acts of remembrance," wrote a law school colleague, Gordon Young.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
Dr. Theodore H. Wilson Jr., former chief of surgery at Union Memorial Hospital who earlier had been chief of surgery at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda and a captain in the Navy Medical Corps, died Monday of cancer at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. He was 91. "Ted was an amazing man and was just pure class from the way he ran the department to the way he treated people," said Dr. William H.B. Howard, a longtime Union Memorial Hospital surgeon and friend.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Robert Lamont Tate, who founded two industrial manufacturing businesses and was a former president of the Maryland Chamber of Commerce, died of heart disease Oct. 5 at his Sarasota, Fla., home. The former Ruxton resident was 89. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of William J. Tate and the former Mary Lamont. His father's family, who were of Scots ancestry, lived in Belfast, Northern Ireland. His father was a marine engineer at Harland & Wolff, builders of the Titanic and numerous other vessels.
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske | October 15, 2013
The Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington might seem an odd place for a play memorializing a Howard County couple. But on a pleasant summer evening earlier this year, that's exactly what was showing. The play was “Unforgettable: Letters from Korea.” It was written by the couple's daughter, Susan Thompson, a professional actress and playwright, and staged July 25 at the Korean War Veterans Memorial during a week of events commemorating the 60th anniversary of the end of the Korean War. Thompson wrote “Unforgettable” after discovering hundreds of letters her parents had exchanged during their courtship while her father served in Korea.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
WASHINGTON - Nothing was going to stop Jack Poitras from playing taps at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial on Wednesday, not even the National Park Police. "I said, 'I am willing to be arrested,'" the Vietnam veteran from Missouri recalled. He had been told the nation's memorials to those who served with him, in World War II and the Korean War, would be closed the day he and scores of other veterans made long-planned trips by plane, tour bus and wheelchair. For 55 years, Poitras has played the bugle at military funerals at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery in St. Louis, and he wasn't going to miss what could be his only chance to do it on some of the nation's most hallowed ground.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Staff Writer | July 26, 1995
For more than four decades, veterans of the U.S. Army's last all-black unit were shamed by their country's official history, which characterized them as cowardly and inept soldiers during the Korean War.Yesterday, only days before the unveiling of the Korean War Memorial in Washington, the Army finally sought to soften that blow, rewriting its official history to attribute the 24th Regiment's failings in combat to the mistrust, hostility and confusion caused...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2013
Charles W. Thomas Jr., former owner of several steel fabrication companies and a Korean War veteran, died Saturday from renal failure at Stella Maris Hospice. The longtime Mays Chapel resident was 85. The son of Charles W. Thomas Sr., owner of Acme Steel Engineering Co., and Mary J. Thomas, a homemaker, Charles Wesley Thomas Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. After graduating in 1947 from the McDonogh School, Mr. Thomas followed his father into the steel fabrication business.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
William O. Goldstein, a Korean War veteran who practiced law in Baltimore for half a century, died Aug. 21 of kidney failure at Roland Park Place. He was 87. The son of Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, an internationally known urological surgeon, and Elsie May Goldstein, a homemaker and volunteer, William Osler Goldstein was born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park and Guilford. After graduating in 1945 from City College, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1949 from Washington College in Chestertown.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.