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By Special to the Sun | June 22, 2003
A Memorable Place Where elders and children are treasured By Linda Roof SPECIAL TO THE SUN I recently had the privilege of escorting my daughter-in-law and beautiful 6-month-old grandson to their new home in South Korea. My son is a captain in the U.S. Army and had arrived two months earlier. I love to travel, and this opportunity offered a great adventure. I knew nothing about Korea, but one month's vacation would give me ample time to learn. The second night in Seoul, I walked my grandson to a popular shopping district known as Itaewon.
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TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | June 22, 2003
A Memorable Place Where elders and children are treasured By Linda Roof SPECIAL TO THE SUN I recently had the privilege of escorting my daughter-in-law and beautiful 6-month-old grandson to their new home in South Korea. My son is a captain in the U.S. Army and had arrived two months earlier. I love to travel, and this opportunity offered a great adventure. I knew nothing about Korea, but one month's vacation would give me ample time to learn. The second night in Seoul, I walked my grandson to a popular shopping district known as Itaewon.
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NEWS
By Tony P. Hall | February 18, 1997
AMERICA HAS a proud tradition of refusing to use food as a weapon against hungry people, no matter how abhorrent their leaders may be. That humanitarian tradition is the moral underpinning for our claim to global leadership, and it is under strain on the Korean peninsula.For half a century, we have steadily committed U.S. soldiers to securing peace in Korea, at a current annual cost to U.S. taxpayers of $10 billion. Today, the fate of the 37,000 Americans now serving is being forgotten, lost in the Korean intrigues that sidetrack our diplomats.
NEWS
By Tony P. Hall | February 18, 1997
AMERICA HAS a proud tradition of refusing to use food as a weapon against hungry people, no matter how abhorrent their leaders may be. That humanitarian tradition is the moral underpinning for our claim to global leadership, and it is under strain on the Korean peninsula.For half a century, we have steadily committed U.S. soldiers to securing peace in Korea, at a current annual cost to U.S. taxpayers of $10 billion. Today, the fate of the 37,000 Americans now serving is being forgotten, lost in the Korean intrigues that sidetrack our diplomats.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Sun Staff Writer | June 19, 1994
When the nuclear crisis on the Korean peninsula began to heat up recently, June Park Sunpun got worried. "When I see it on the TV, I get scared," she said. "I'm really afraid."Then she called her sister in Seoul, the South Korean capital, who calmed her fears."She says everything fine back there," said Mrs. Park, 61, who runs a dry cleaner and tailoring shop on 31st Street near St. Paul in Baltimore.If this reassurance wasn't enough for her, Mrs. Park then spoke to a friend in Owings Mills who had just phoned her sister in Seoul.
NEWS
February 26, 1995
John O. Emmerich, 65, president of Emmerich Enterprises Inc., which published 13 daily and weekly newspapers in Mississippi and Louisiana, died yesterday after collapsing outside his house in Greenwood, Miss., upon returning from a morning jog.He was a director of The Associated Press from 1981 to 1990, including one year as vice chairman. During his career, he also worked at The Evening Sun, the Minneapolis Tribune, and the Houston Chronicle, and was president of the Mississippi Press Association.
NEWS
May 4, 2011
The U.S. is the world's leading humanitarian nation and has been one of the largest donors of emergency food to North Korea. The New York Times insists policymakers should continue to focus on the humanitarian virtues of giving food to madman Kim Jong Il while ignoring unpleasant realities, one of which is that doing so may not be in the security interests of the U.S., the region or the suffering citizens of North Korea. The UN says that North Korea will need international food assistance again this year, which is tragic.
NEWS
January 3, 2011
I read with dismay the story in the Howard County section of the Sun headlined "School board makeup raises concern" (Jan. 2). As a 34-year resident of Howard County I have learned that the county is a great place for minorities to live and where minorities have plenty of influence and plenty of opportunity. What would Del. Frank Turner and the mysterious African-American Coalition of Howard County have us do about the fact that there isn't a black person on the school board?
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | July 31, 1991
Working 12- to 14-hour days, six days in a row, doesn't keep the county's Korean Christians from church. It makes them desperate to go.Sunday church for these families has become the high point in a hard week, a few hours of security where everyone speaks their language and knows their ways, say Korean pastors and parishioners."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 18, 2004
TOKYO - While reports filter out of North Korea that portraits of the country's leader, Kim Jong Il, have been removed from their honored spots, the official radio and news agency are dropping the honorific "Dear Leader" from their reports on Kim, according to Radiopress, a Japanese news agency that monitors North Korea's radio. Analysts are debating whether Kim is losing his grip on power, or, more likely, quietly orchestrating the downsizing of his own personality cult. As the nation's propaganda chief in the 1970s, Kim paved his way to power by raising his father, Kim Il Sung, to demigod status as founder of the Communist state.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Sun Staff Writer | June 19, 1994
When the nuclear crisis on the Korean peninsula began to heat up recently, June Park Sunpun got worried. "When I see it on the TV, I get scared," she said. "I'm really afraid."Then she called her sister in Seoul, the South Korean capital, who calmed her fears."She says everything fine back there," said Mrs. Park, 61, who runs a dry cleaner and tailoring shop on 31st Street near St. Paul in Baltimore.If this reassurance wasn't enough for her, Mrs. Park then spoke to a friend in Owings Mills who had just phoned her sister in Seoul.
NEWS
November 20, 1995
UNRAVELING IN SOUTH KOREA is scandal on a grand scale -- a Watergate involving presidential criminality and financial corruption of S&L proportions. Former President Roh Tae Woo is in jail, facing indictment for operating a $650 million slush fund fed by bribes he took from industrial magnates. He might soon be joined by some of the CEOs deeply involved in a government-business network that, through fair means or foul, has propelled South Korea into eleventh ranking among the world's economies.
NEWS
April 21, 1996
BILATERAL TALKS with North Korea (which the United States pursues while saying it won't) in Berlin this weekend concern Pyongyang's alarming development and sales of missiles. But they could elicit a response to the joint U.S.-South Korean proposal to end the Korean War by replacing its 1953 armistice with a peace treaty.The posture has been that Pyongyang wants to stiff South Korea by negotiating solely with the U.S. Pyongyang's incursions into the Demilitarized Zone are presumably aimed at forcing the U.S. to talk on North Korean terms.
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