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By Michael Duck and Michael Duck,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 16, 2003
Dancers glided across the church hall, the vibrantly colored fabric of their costumes streaming after them. With traditional Korean steps, they flowed from lines into circles and back again. They flicked their wrists in unison, closing their fans with a crack. And just feet away, a few dozen Korean children stared in awe and admiration. Bonny Shilling watched her 6-year-old daughter Katie gaze at the dancers, knowing she wanted to learn those steps. "She's proud of this," Shilling said.
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NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun reporter | September 23, 2007
Miyong Kim worries that many younger Korean-Americans aren't familiar with their parents' culture. Yesterday, she brought her 16-year-old son downtown to celebrate Korean culture and its place in Maryland at the 30th annual Korean Festival. "It's to teach the next generation and let them understand this is who you are," said Kim of the festival, which was held at War Memorial Plaza. The younger generations of Korean-Americans stop attending Korean churches and many can't speak the language, she said.
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NEWS
By Donna W. Payne and Donna W. Payne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 17, 2001
In the first century A.D., the apostle Paul, the first Christian missionary, established a church in Philippi, a prosperous Roman colony in what is now modern-day Greece. Later, while in prison for his missionary work, Paul wrote a letter to the young church urging them to follow the example of Jesus Christ. Paul's letter, preserved in the New Testament of the Bible, has served as inspiration for Columbia's Korean-American Church of Philippi, said its senior pastor, the Rev. Young Sun Song.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2005
Two sets of metal gates stand in the center of Howard County Center for the Art's gallery, one adorned with copper peppers announcing the birth of a boy and one hung with metal pine needles to announce a girl. Artist Komelia Hongja Okim said her installation - which also uses charcoal, real pine boughs and red peppers and silk flowers - "shows the Korean custom of putting symbolic things at the door when you have childbirth." Korean heritage is the unifying theme of the exhibit In Search of Dreams Across the Pacific, which runs today through Oct. 21 and features 11 Korean-American artists.
NEWS
By Dolly Merritt and Dolly Merritt,SPECIAL TO THE SUN Sun staff writer Alisa Samuels contributed to this article | April 1, 1996
The children in Soon Hee Ahn's classes learn about Korean culture in a form that dates back centuries: the rhythmic drums, swishing fans and colorful costumes of traditional Korean dance."
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun reporter | September 23, 2007
Miyong Kim worries that many younger Korean-Americans aren't familiar with their parents' culture. Yesterday, she brought her 16-year-old son downtown to celebrate Korean culture and its place in Maryland at the 30th annual Korean Festival. "It's to teach the next generation and let them understand this is who you are," said Kim of the festival, which was held at War Memorial Plaza. The younger generations of Korean-Americans stop attending Korean churches and many can't speak the language, she said.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2005
Two sets of metal gates stand in the center of Howard County Center for the Art's gallery, one adorned with copper peppers announcing the birth of a boy and one hung with metal pine needles to announce a girl. Artist Komelia Hongja Okim said her installation - which also uses charcoal, real pine boughs and red peppers and silk flowers - "shows the Korean custom of putting symbolic things at the door when you have childbirth." Korean heritage is the unifying theme of the exhibit In Search of Dreams Across the Pacific, which runs today through Oct. 21 and features 11 Korean-American artists.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Evening Sun Staff | July 23, 1991
Dressed in a T-shirt and shorts, Devin Boulware, 7, ambled nervously up to the counter of a Korean grocery store in West Baltimore where a stern-looking merchant stood."
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | April 18, 1993
Reading a Korean-language Bible in her tiny 19th-floor apartment high above East Baltimore, Bok Soon Chung, looks far removed from the city below.But it is precisely to avoid isolation and to enjoy the company of others who speak her language and share her culture that the 76-year-old widow, like a growing number of elderly Koreans in Baltimore, has chosen to live by herself in public housing.Korean culture -- and Asian-American stereotypes -- might suggest that grandparents such as Mrs. Chung would live as part of extended families to care for their children's children.
NEWS
By Jennifer Keats and Jennifer Keats,Contributing writer | October 25, 1990
When Kathy White visited the Korean Presbyterian Church, she felt lost even though she hadn't left Anne Arundel County.After sitting through a service without understanding a word, White, the Pascal Senior Center's satellite site coordinator, said, "I think I know what it feels like to be someone from another country. I have a sensitivity and awareness of other colors and cultures," she added.At the suggestion of Charles Lawrence, assistant director of the county department of aging, White joined forces with leaders of the county's Korean community in May 1989 to come up with an alternative for Korean seniors who had to drive to Baltimore County, the nearest site for Korean-language programs.
NEWS
By Michael Duck and Michael Duck,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 16, 2003
Dancers glided across the church hall, the vibrantly colored fabric of their costumes streaming after them. With traditional Korean steps, they flowed from lines into circles and back again. They flicked their wrists in unison, closing their fans with a crack. And just feet away, a few dozen Korean children stared in awe and admiration. Bonny Shilling watched her 6-year-old daughter Katie gaze at the dancers, knowing she wanted to learn those steps. "She's proud of this," Shilling said.
NEWS
By Donna W. Payne and Donna W. Payne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 17, 2001
In the first century A.D., the apostle Paul, the first Christian missionary, established a church in Philippi, a prosperous Roman colony in what is now modern-day Greece. Later, while in prison for his missionary work, Paul wrote a letter to the young church urging them to follow the example of Jesus Christ. Paul's letter, preserved in the New Testament of the Bible, has served as inspiration for Columbia's Korean-American Church of Philippi, said its senior pastor, the Rev. Young Sun Song.
NEWS
By Dolly Merritt and Dolly Merritt,SPECIAL TO THE SUN Sun staff writer Alisa Samuels contributed to this article | April 1, 1996
The children in Soon Hee Ahn's classes learn about Korean culture in a form that dates back centuries: the rhythmic drums, swishing fans and colorful costumes of traditional Korean dance."
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | April 18, 1993
Reading a Korean-language Bible in her tiny 19th-floor apartment high above East Baltimore, Bok Soon Chung, looks far removed from the city below.But it is precisely to avoid isolation and to enjoy the company of others who speak her language and share her culture that the 76-year-old widow, like a growing number of elderly Koreans in Baltimore, has chosen to live by herself in public housing.Korean culture -- and Asian-American stereotypes -- might suggest that grandparents such as Mrs. Chung would live as part of extended families to care for their children's children.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Evening Sun Staff | July 23, 1991
Dressed in a T-shirt and shorts, Devin Boulware, 7, ambled nervously up to the counter of a Korean grocery store in West Baltimore where a stern-looking merchant stood."
NEWS
By Jennifer Keats and Jennifer Keats,Contributing writer | October 25, 1990
When Kathy White visited the Korean Presbyterian Church, she felt lost even though she hadn't left Anne Arundel County.After sitting through a service without understanding a word, White, the Pascal Senior Center's satellite site coordinator, said, "I think I know what it feels like to be someone from another country. I have a sensitivity and awareness of other colors and cultures," she added.At the suggestion of Charles Lawrence, assistant director of the county department of aging, White joined forces with leaders of the county's Korean community in May 1989 to come up with an alternative for Korean seniors who had to drive to Baltimore County, the nearest site for Korean-language programs.
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