Advertisement
HomeCollectionsKorean Community
IN THE NEWS

Korean Community

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2003
As an assistant state's attorney in Baltimore, John Park likes helping his fellow Korean-Americans when they are crime victims. But that's often hard to do, he said, because many in the Korean community don't trust the government. Factors ranging from language barriers to fear of retaliation result in cases falling apart, or never being pursued at all. The Baltimore state's attorney's office and Police Department and the Korean-American Grocers and Licensed Beverage Association hope to start changing that tomorrow at a forum to explain the criminal justice system to the Korean community and other Asians.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun reporter | September 23, 2007
Miyong Kim worries that many younger Korean-Americans aren't familiar with their parents' culture. Yesterday, she brought her 16-year-old son downtown to celebrate Korean culture and its place in Maryland at the 30th annual Korean Festival. "It's to teach the next generation and let them understand this is who you are," said Kim of the festival, which was held at War Memorial Plaza. The younger generations of Korean-Americans stop attending Korean churches and many can't speak the language, she said.
Advertisement
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | May 28, 2007
Each time Diana Zambidis visits Lotte Plaza in Ellicott City, she finds something new to experience, and it's not always the food. It could be listening to the Korean pop music blaring from the loudspeaker, or attempting to translate the specials - printed in Korean - in the store's weekly circular, or discovering exotic foods like salted fish intestines and squid jerky. "You have to get over the music," Zambidis, of Ellicott City, said with a laugh. "But the food is outstanding. ... It's very reasonable.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | May 28, 2007
Each time Diana Zambidis visits Lotte Plaza in Ellicott City, she finds something new to experience, and it's not always the food. It could be listening to the Korean pop music blaring from the loudspeaker, or attempting to translate the specials - printed in Korean - in the store's weekly circular, or discovering exotic foods like salted fish intestines and squid jerky. "You have to get over the music," Zambidis, of Ellicott City, said with a laugh. "But the food is outstanding. ... It's very reasonable.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2003
Lisa Chong rarely watches "Must-See TV Thursday." She has her own television event: "Gotta Rent Videos Monday." That's when the latest episodes of Chong's favorite shows, Korean soap operas, are released to local Korean-language video stores. On Monday, Chong and a friend drove straight from school to a video store in the Bethany 40 Center to get the latest episodes of her favorite soap, Orlin, which focuses on the struggles of a young gambler. "Once you start, you just can't stop," said the 16-year-old River Hill High School junior.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun reporter | September 23, 2007
Miyong Kim worries that many younger Korean-Americans aren't familiar with their parents' culture. Yesterday, she brought her 16-year-old son downtown to celebrate Korean culture and its place in Maryland at the 30th annual Korean Festival. "It's to teach the next generation and let them understand this is who you are," said Kim of the festival, which was held at War Memorial Plaza. The younger generations of Korean-Americans stop attending Korean churches and many can't speak the language, she said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 25, 1999
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and Korean community leaders broke ground yesterday at Federal Street and Greenmount Avenue on a $1.1 million project to turn the decaying Benjamin Banneker School building into a center for Korean senior citizens and residents of the East Baltimore neighborhood. Kimo Nam, Baltimore Metropolitan Korean Senior Center executive director, said the facility in the 800 block of Park Ave. will relocate when the renovation is completed, probably about May 1. The center -- which offers English and citizenship classes, field trips, health care aid and a daily lunch -- has had three locations in 12 years.
NEWS
October 27, 1997
THE AREA FROM North Avenue to 25th Street, between Howard and St. Paul streets, remains a veritable no-man's land. Not quite Charles Village, the community has tried to forge an identity for itself as a midtown neighborhood of mixed residential and commercial uses.Attempts to pump life into the intersection of Charles Street and North Avenue, a key locale, have floundered. The North Avenue Market, which in the late 1920s was the city's largest, never recovered from a series of fires. The old Parkway Theater remains padlocked, with plans to convert it into a retail emporium seemingly on eternal hold.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 19, 2002
C. Vernon Gray may not be going to Annapolis as a state senator after wrapping up his 20-year career on the Howard County Council, but he will represent the county in South Korea for a week. The peripatetic Gray, 63, has traveled widely and visited China, Japan and Taiwan, but his departure Saturday on a Korean government-sponsored cultural visit has its roots at home. "We nominated him because he is very sensitive about our needs," said Sue Song, director of operations for the Korean American Community of Howard County, which recommended Gray for the trip.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 30, 1997
And so the Korean community in Baltimore goes to the graveyard once more, wipes away abundant tears, and tries to remind itself why the idea of life in America once sounded so wonderful.This time they go for the slain grocer Chi Sup Kim, 44, who follows the slain merchant Yang Koo Yoon, 46, while the wounded Won Hee Ma, 58, clings to life in her Johns Hopkins Hospital bed after she was shot in the chest in a botched grocery store robbery.And at graveside, they think once more of the killer of poor Joel Lee, a killer who laughs at a justice system too trembly to pursue him.The fear in the Korean community is now palpable.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | April 21, 2007
For Korean-Americans, the realization of a shared ethnicity with Virginia Tech gunman Seung-Hui Cho has left many trying to untangle a complex web of emotions. Shock that someone could commit such a horrific act of violence. Anguish for the victims. And the unfounded fear - common among virtually any ethnic minority - that the actions of one might taint the whole, says Gie Kim, president of the Washington chapter of the Korean American Coalition. "Everyone I talked to - black, Jewish, Korean, whatever - we were all hoping it wasn't one of us," she said.
NEWS
July 14, 2006
Korean-Americans deserve an apology The Korean Society of Maryland, an advocacy group representing the interests of 60,000 Korean-Americans in Maryland, condemns the recent launching of missiles by North Korea. However, there is a major difference between the democratic South Korean nation and communist North Korea, both politically and ideologically. Yet in The Sun's article "Schaefer's words stir criticism" (July 6), state Comptroller William Donald Schaefer was quoted as saying, "Korea's another one, all of a sudden they're our friends, too, shooting missiles at us."
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2003
As an assistant state's attorney in Baltimore, John Park likes helping his fellow Korean-Americans when they are crime victims. But that's often hard to do, he said, because many in the Korean community don't trust the government. Factors ranging from language barriers to fear of retaliation result in cases falling apart, or never being pursued at all. The Baltimore state's attorney's office and Police Department and the Korean-American Grocers and Licensed Beverage Association hope to start changing that tomorrow at a forum to explain the criminal justice system to the Korean community and other Asians.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2003
Lisa Chong rarely watches "Must-See TV Thursday." She has her own television event: "Gotta Rent Videos Monday." That's when the latest episodes of Chong's favorite shows, Korean soap operas, are released to local Korean-language video stores. On Monday, Chong and a friend drove straight from school to a video store in the Bethany 40 Center to get the latest episodes of her favorite soap, Orlin, which focuses on the struggles of a young gambler. "Once you start, you just can't stop," said the 16-year-old River Hill High School junior.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 19, 2002
C. Vernon Gray may not be going to Annapolis as a state senator after wrapping up his 20-year career on the Howard County Council, but he will represent the county in South Korea for a week. The peripatetic Gray, 63, has traveled widely and visited China, Japan and Taiwan, but his departure Saturday on a Korean government-sponsored cultural visit has its roots at home. "We nominated him because he is very sensitive about our needs," said Sue Song, director of operations for the Korean American Community of Howard County, which recommended Gray for the trip.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2002
The Howard County Korean-American community showed its face - along with its dances, music and customs - yesterday in one of its biggest public displays. The event, dubbed the "Korean Cultural Day," drew about 800 people, organizers estimate. Some viewed the event as a milestone: Although more than 6,000 people of Korean descent live in Howard County, according to U.S. Census data - making it the third-largest minority group after African-Americans and Latinos - Korean community leaders acknowledge that they have not been very visible.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | August 1, 1995
A heartbreaking sight last week was Joel Lee's family at the criminal courthouse, where they once imagined American justice would be done, sobbing when they heard the inconceivable news that no one would be punished for the murder of their son.So it goes in the city of Baltimore, many said. A black jury, everyone said (unless they had black skin). Another sign of tension between blacks and Koreans, said others, including furious leaders of Baltimore's Korean community.But the immigrant family of Joel Lee, a 21-year-old senior at Towson State University who was shot in the face in September during a robbery, didn't have to say anything at all. Their tears said everything, and they added great sadness to the general revulsion and despair felt when a jury somehow found 20-year-old Davon Neverdon not guilty of Lee's murder.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1999
When Alphonso Rhee visited the Towson branch of the Baltimore County Public Library recently, he had a shock. In front of him was a case full of books in his native language, Korean."
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2002
During the first several years that Sun Hui Kim lived in the United States, English was an afterthought. As a homemaker, the Korean native didn't need to know how to say much more than "Hello," "How are you" and "Fine" to get by in this country. But now that she's working at a deli, learning English has become a priority - so much so that she drives from her home in Silver Spring five nights a week to attend classes at the Power Academy in Ellicott City. "We go to the store, market, everywhere we go, they say, `What you say?
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.