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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick | June 9, 2011
Drink water, and plenty of it, is typically the first rule for surviving a heat wave. Eating spicy foods is how millions of people around the world cope with chronic heat, but does it really work for occasional heat spikes in moderate climates? It seems like the kind of thing that works when your body is trained to sweat. Either way, I can't stop thinking about Korean barbecue. The pork belly spectacular in the photo is from Honey Pig Barbecue in Ellicott City. What do you like to eat when the temperature soars?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick | June 9, 2011
Drink water, and plenty of it, is typically the first rule for surviving a heat wave. Eating spicy foods is how millions of people around the world cope with chronic heat, but does it really work for occasional heat spikes in moderate climates? It seems like the kind of thing that works when your body is trained to sweat. Either way, I can't stop thinking about Korean barbecue. The pork belly spectacular in the photo is from Honey Pig Barbecue in Ellicott City. What do you like to eat when the temperature soars?
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NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | September 3, 2010
Welcome to my first restaurant review column, wherein I will describe an exquisite meal I enjoyed last Sunday evening. Unfortunately, I really can't tell you the names of any of the dishes I sampled. I can't expound on the origin of the recipes or the inventive things the chef did to change them up. I can say for sure, however, that some of the dishes were made with chicken, some were made with beef and some were made with the relentless, fiery tears of the scorned Goddess of Red Pepper Heaven.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer Broadwater, Lisa Kawata and Diane Pajak | April 1, 2011
Our first forays into Korean dining taught us some valuable lessons: Expect the unexpected, and don't be surprised if the wait staff doesn't speak fluent English. Be patient, open-minded and -- most of all -- enjoy the food, because it's delicious. Oh, and you might want to brush up on your use of chopsticks before you go; otherwise you might have to eat with a plastic fork. There are almost a dozen Korean restaurants dotting Ellicott City's Route 40 corridor -- some specialize in Korean barbecue or soon doo boo (tofu stew)
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2010
The enclave that is Lotte Plaza is situated on an island, a roughly triangular plot formed by the confluence of highways 29 and 40 that feeds a hurried Ellicott City commercial district. Anchored by a Korean grocery store, the plaza is home to a smattering of restaurants and the usual strip mall suspects made distinctive by Korean subtitles on the doors and windows and a precipitous cultural shift inside. At the far end of the main building, Shin Chon Garden advertises Korean barbecue, which it delivers, along with a bracing (and I suspect for much of its clientele, welcome)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | November 11, 1999
The namesake sunflowers are no longer around, but Sunflowers the restaurant is alive and kicking on Kent Island. The French-European fine-dining restaurant and its cafe opened in September; this week, owner Lisa Takala opens the Old Town Grill in the same Victorian house (401 Love Point Road). The grill serves steaks, barbecue sandwiches and the like. For fancier food, head for the Sunflowers dining room. There you can get dishes such as sweetbreads ($18) and rack of lamb ($26).Have a Nice DayIf disco, the hustle, smiley faces, Burt Reynolds and other icons of the '70s make you feel groovy, you're going to love the Have a Nice Day Cafe, scheduled to open at 34 Market Place near the Inner Harbor on Nov. 18.The retro dance club is part of a Charlotte, N.C.-based chain.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 14, 1998
The Blue Garden is a triple threat among Asian restaurants, specializing in Korean, Japanese and Chinese food, and handling each cuisine amazingly well.Mr. and Mrs. Chong So have owned their restaurant on Ritchie Highway for 16 years, serving mostly Chinese and Korean dishes. Last year, they remodeled, added a sushi bar and Korean barbecue tables, and expanded their menu to include more Korean and Japanese fare.We sat in the front room of the Blue Garden, where tables are thick, lacquered slices of tree trunks, outfitted with stainless-steel grills for Korean barbecue.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KATHRYN HIGHAM and KATHRYN HIGHAM,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 25, 1998
My politically astute friend pointed out that while relations between the countries of Japan and Korea are strained at best, relations between their cuisines are booming. It is not uncommon in the Baltimore area to find Japanese sushi and sweet Korean barbecue on the same menu, as they are at Han Sung in Ellicott City.Owned by Choong Mo Kang, this spare, bright restaurant has the feeling of a luncheonette, with its tables topped in wood-grain Formica and cartons stacked in the hallway. There's little ornamentation outside of a few paper lanterns, sushi posters and a small sushi bar where Kang serves as chef.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 7, 2006
Shin Chon Gardens is known for its Korean barbecue - nifty little feasts that start as a show, with the food prepared on grills built right into the table. But Jum Suh, the owner of this clean and spacious eatery, says some American customers are nervous about trying Korean food. That's why she offers Japanese cuisine as well, like pristine sushi and sashimi, salty udon soups and lightly battered tempura. What usually happens, she says, is that one person in a party of four or five will be curious, and order something Korean.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer Broadwater, Lisa Kawata and Diane Pajak | April 1, 2011
Our first forays into Korean dining taught us some valuable lessons: Expect the unexpected, and don't be surprised if the wait staff doesn't speak fluent English. Be patient, open-minded and -- most of all -- enjoy the food, because it's delicious. Oh, and you might want to brush up on your use of chopsticks before you go; otherwise you might have to eat with a plastic fork. There are almost a dozen Korean restaurants dotting Ellicott City's Route 40 corridor -- some specialize in Korean barbecue or soon doo boo (tofu stew)
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2010
The enclave that is Lotte Plaza is situated on an island, a roughly triangular plot formed by the confluence of highways 29 and 40 that feeds a hurried Ellicott City commercial district. Anchored by a Korean grocery store, the plaza is home to a smattering of restaurants and the usual strip mall suspects made distinctive by Korean subtitles on the doors and windows and a precipitous cultural shift inside. At the far end of the main building, Shin Chon Garden advertises Korean barbecue, which it delivers, along with a bracing (and I suspect for much of its clientele, welcome)
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | September 5, 2010
Welcome to my first restaurant review column, wherein I will describe an exquisite meal I enjoyed last Sunday evening. Unfortunately, I really can't tell you the names of any of the dishes I sampled. I can't expound on the origin of the recipes or the inventive things the chef did to change them up. I can say for sure, however, that some of the dishes were made with chicken, some were made with beef and some were made with the relentless, fiery tears of the scorned Goddess of Red Pepper Heaven.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2010
At this restaurant, your table is on fire. OK, not quite. It merely sizzles. Not to worry. This is benign combustion at Honey Pig, a new restaurant in Ellicott City featuring Korean barbecue. Think strips of meat, chicken or seafood cooked quickly on a tabletop grill that sits in the center of your table and becomes the focal point of your meal. Think small plates of spicy sides, pickled vegetables — some smooth, some quite fiery . Finally, put all of these elements in a big room crammed with stainless-steel tables, filled with energy and waves of Korean-speaking servers moving to loud music, and you've got the scene at Honey Pig. Igniting the grill and most of the subsequent activities associated with its operation are not your concern.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 7, 2006
Shin Chon Gardens is known for its Korean barbecue - nifty little feasts that start as a show, with the food prepared on grills built right into the table. But Jum Suh, the owner of this clean and spacious eatery, says some American customers are nervous about trying Korean food. That's why she offers Japanese cuisine as well, like pristine sushi and sashimi, salty udon soups and lightly battered tempura. What usually happens, she says, is that one person in a party of four or five will be curious, and order something Korean.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2003
Imagine Little Italy without a spaghetti house or Greektown sans moussaka. That has been the situation in Howard County, the Baltimore area's strongest Korean-American enclave. Howard supports nearly a dozen Korean-language churches, two bureaus of Korean-language daily newspapers and a giant Korean supermarket. But there wasn't a single kalbijip, the traditional Korean open-flame barbecue house. "It was amazing. I couldn't understand why there wasn't one here," said Tae Kim, a Kings Contrivance resident who would drive to Glen Burnie or Wheaton to get traditional Korean fare cooked over a grill in the middle of the table.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | November 11, 1999
The namesake sunflowers are no longer around, but Sunflowers the restaurant is alive and kicking on Kent Island. The French-European fine-dining restaurant and its cafe opened in September; this week, owner Lisa Takala opens the Old Town Grill in the same Victorian house (401 Love Point Road). The grill serves steaks, barbecue sandwiches and the like. For fancier food, head for the Sunflowers dining room. There you can get dishes such as sweetbreads ($18) and rack of lamb ($26).Have a Nice DayIf disco, the hustle, smiley faces, Burt Reynolds and other icons of the '70s make you feel groovy, you're going to love the Have a Nice Day Cafe, scheduled to open at 34 Market Place near the Inner Harbor on Nov. 18.The retro dance club is part of a Charlotte, N.C.-based chain.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KATHRYN HIGHAM and KATHRYN HIGHAM,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 25, 1998
My politically astute friend pointed out that while relations between the countries of Japan and Korea are strained at best, relations between their cuisines are booming. It is not uncommon in the Baltimore area to find Japanese sushi and sweet Korean barbecue on the same menu, as they are at Han Sung in Ellicott City.Owned by Choong Mo Kang, this spare, bright restaurant has the feeling of a luncheonette, with its tables topped in wood-grain Formica and cartons stacked in the hallway. There's little ornamentation outside of a few paper lanterns, sushi posters and a small sushi bar where Kang serves as chef.
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