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NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Michael James contributed to this article | August 3, 1995
Shouting "We shall overcome!" and "We want justice!" about 125 Korean-Americans rallied in downtown Baltimore yesterday to condemn the acquittal of Davon A. Neverdon in the shooting death of one of their own.Protesters filled the 98-degree air with chants as they marched in front of Courthouse East, where a jury last week acquitted Mr. Neverdon of the 1993 slaying of Joel J. Lee, a 21-year-old Towson State University student.The Korean marchers -- and the sprinkling of African-Americans and whites who joined them -- disagreed with the jury's verdict.
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NEWS
October 6, 2013
Over the years I have represented many Korean-American small business owners when Baltimore City acquired their stores, which included liquor outlets, as part of neighborhood renewal. Korean-American small business owners embody the American dream of immigrants striving to get ahead through hard work. For the last 40 years, it was city policy to compensate the owners when it shuttered their businesses. Now, however, after many owners have scrimped and saved and worked for years to purchase liquor outlets that are absolutely legal in every respect, the city is switching gears and proposing to eliminate those businesses by revising the zoning code - and not pay the owners on cent in compensation.
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NEWS
By Michael James and James Bock and Michael James and James Bock,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1997
Korean-American leaders mourned the killing of their own yesterday, leading a 65-car funeral motorcade past two stores where Korean merchants were slain recently and blaming the tragedies not on racial tension but on "the common enemy" -- crime."
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2012
When Michelle Ha came to the United States in 1980, she dreamed of getting a college degree and returning to South Korea to become a politician. That didn't happen, but she's still serving her community. From the liquor store she runs in a downtrodden part of East Baltimore, she works as a liaison to other Korean-American-owned businesses, a minder of children and seniors and an organizer of many large holiday meals. Ha also does her part to deter crime, police and neighbors say. "A lot of business owners make money in the city and don't support the community, but that's not me," said Ha from her Kay's Liquor and Convenience, in the 2400 block of Biddle St. "Now the city wants to take my life away.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1997
The Baltimore City Health Department's decision to permanently revoke the business license of a Park Heights grocery last month for numerous health violations has left many Korean-American business owners fearful that the fallout could affect other business owners, say officials with Korean-American community groups.As a result, the Korean-American Grocers Association is sponsoring a meeting at 3 p.m. tomorrow at the Korean Center, 27 E. North Ave., to discuss the now-closed Canaan Food Outlet and ways to foster better relations between Korean-Americans and African-Americans, organizers said.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2002
The Howard County Korean-American community showed its face - along with its dances, music and customs - yesterday in one of its biggest public displays. The event, dubbed the "Korean Cultural Day," drew about 800 people, organizers estimate. Some viewed the event as a milestone: Although more than 6,000 people of Korean descent live in Howard County, according to U.S. Census data - making it the third-largest minority group after African-Americans and Latinos - Korean community leaders acknowledge that they have not been very visible.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | August 23, 1999
Baltimore mayoral candidates pledged yesterday to create a commission that would give Asian-American residents a voice in City Hall.The promise was made during an appearance by nine Democratic hopefuls at a candidates forum before 75 members of the Korean-American Citizens League. Organizers of the event, held at the University of Baltimore, told the candidates that more than 1,000 shops in the city are operated by Korean-Americans and estimated that about 60,000 Korean-Americans live in the metropolitan area.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | January 26, 1999
With the recently opened "Sae Ba Ram," Maryland Art Place has one of the handsomest shows around.Pronounced much the way it looks (Say Bah Rahm), the phrase means "New Wind" in Korean, and the show contains the work of Korean-American artists working in the Baltimore-Washington area. Sponsored by the Korean American Artists Association, and curated by MAP's executive director, Jack Rasmussen, it opened last month at Rockville Arts Place outside of Washington and moved to Baltimore last week.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2003
Imagine Little Italy without a spaghetti house or Greektown sans moussaka. That has been the situation in Howard County, the Baltimore area's strongest Korean-American enclave. Howard supports nearly a dozen Korean-language churches, two bureaus of Korean-language daily newspapers and a giant Korean supermarket. But there wasn't a single kalbijip, the traditional Korean open-flame barbecue house. "It was amazing. I couldn't understand why there wasn't one here," said Tae Kim, a Kings Contrivance resident who would drive to Glen Burnie or Wheaton to get traditional Korean fare cooked over a grill in the middle of the table.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1997
At times, 11-year-old Gi Eun Lee feels as if she has a double life.By day, the sixth-grader attends Glen Burnie Baptist Church School and plays with her American friends.But after school and on weekends, she switches gears and studies at the Korean-American Academy -- learning Korean, penciling the language's 24-letter alphabet in a notebook and reading about the country's history.It can be confusing, but Lee said her dual existence is important to her as a Korean-American."It's embarrassing if you're a Korean person and you don't know the language," she said.
FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2012
Traneika Fleet wants to become a nurse and help cancer patients. Josh Greenspan aims to be an aerospace engineer. And classical singer Yoon Jung Kim and actor Delante Desouza both dream of performing on the professional stage. These Baltimore students are one step closer to their goals after receiving $500 scholarships awarded recently by the Korean-American Grocers & Licensed Beverage Association of Maryland Inc., known as KAGRO. The group, whose mission includes helping Korean-American retailers adapt to American culture and business practices, launched its scholarship program in 1995.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones , brent.jones@baltsun.com | December 7, 2009
About a decade ago, Inwook Ben Hur opened a small grocery store in Baltimore after relocating to the area to go to graduate school at Coppin State. Hur, like many native Koreans who immigrated here, founded his business with the idea of making enough money to put his children through college, then turning control over to the kids to maintain for the next generation. In the past seven years, though, all three of Hur's children have graduated from school, and none want to have anything to do with running the Eager Street store.
NEWS
By Adrienne Morris and Adrienne Morris,sun reporter | May 2, 2007
Dr. Young Joo Lee was not surprised that many Koreans living in Howard County were interested in attending the county's first Korean-American Health Fair. "Most are legal residents but own small businesses so they tend not to have insurance," said Lee, who works with Chesapeake Oncology-Hematology Associates. "They're so busy working that they don't keep up on health maintenance and prevention, like taking blood pressure, and they usually don't go to a doctor unless they're sick." The event, co-sponsored by the Ellicott City Horizon Council, Howard County Health Department, the Korean American Community Association of Howard County and Howard County General Hospital, attracted about 300 people Sunday to Centennial High School.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | April 21, 2007
For Korean-Americans, the realization of a shared ethnicity with Virginia Tech gunman Seung-Hui Cho has left many trying to untangle a complex web of emotions. Shock that someone could commit such a horrific act of violence. Anguish for the victims. And the unfounded fear - common among virtually any ethnic minority - that the actions of one might taint the whole, says Gie Kim, president of the Washington chapter of the Korean American Coalition. "Everyone I talked to - black, Jewish, Korean, whatever - we were all hoping it wasn't one of us," she said.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2005
Two sets of metal gates stand in the center of Howard County Center for the Art's gallery, one adorned with copper peppers announcing the birth of a boy and one hung with metal pine needles to announce a girl. Artist Komelia Hongja Okim said her installation - which also uses charcoal, real pine boughs and red peppers and silk flowers - "shows the Korean custom of putting symbolic things at the door when you have childbirth." Korean heritage is the unifying theme of the exhibit In Search of Dreams Across the Pacific, which runs today through Oct. 21 and features 11 Korean-American artists.
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON and KELLY BREWINGTON,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2005
Kimo Nam, Jae H. Yoon trudged through 12-hour days with no vacation for nearly 30 years after he arrived in the United States from South Korea. But today, the funk is blasting through the speakers, and Yoon joins rows of other retirees dancing the Bump and Grind like it's their business. Afternoon line dancing at the Greenmount Senior Center is an escape for Korean-American retirees such as Yoon, 69. Typically the last person to leave the dance floor, he's a man who relishes the taste of the spiced cabbage known as kimchi as much as he savors a juicy T-bone steak.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2003
Imagine Little Italy without a spaghetti house or Greektown sans moussaka. That has been the situation in Howard County, the Baltimore area's strongest Korean-American enclave. Howard supports nearly a dozen Korean-language churches, two bureaus of Korean-language daily newspapers and a giant Korean supermarket. But there wasn't a single kalbijip, the traditional Korean open-flame barbecue house. "It was amazing. I couldn't understand why there wasn't one here," said Tae Kim, a Kings Contrivance resident who would drive to Glen Burnie or Wheaton to get traditional Korean fare cooked over a grill in the middle of the table.
SPORTS
By Grahame L. Jones and Grahame L. Jones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 15, 2002
TAEJON, South Korea - There's a lot to be said for having a dependable ally - in war, in peace and, as it turns out, in soccer. The United States, needing only a tie against Poland last night to clinch a place in the final 16 of the World Cup, failed miserably. It was thoroughly outplayed by the Poles from the opening whistle and ended up losing, 3-1. But it is going to the second round, anyway. South Korea's Park Ji Sung earned the U.S. team its berth - and one for his own country, too - by scoring the lone goal at Inchon as the Koreans ousted Portugal from the tournament with a surprising, 1-0 victory over the fifth-ranked team in the world.
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