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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2011
She was born in South Korea, loves her homeland's traditions with a passion and has officially served the burgeoning Korean-American community in Maryland for more than six years now. But Michelle Kim still insists that as a cultural ambassador, she sets something of "a poor example. " Kim, an official with the Korean Society of Maryland, helped organize the 34th Korean Festival in West Friendship on Saturday, an event that drew thousands of people on a brilliantly sunny afternoon.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2014
Otis M. "Jim" Long, a retired Maryland state trooper who survived the sinking of his aircraft carrier during World War II, died Thursday at Harbor Hospital of complications from a fall. He was 87. The son of Nathaniel O. Long and Vera M. Long, Otis Melrose Long, who was known as Jim, was born in Birmingham, Ala., and raised in Richmond, Va. He was a student at John Marshall High School in Richmond, when he withdrew his senior year to enlist in the Navy. He later earned his General Education Development diploma.
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NEWS
May 18, 1992
One outgrowth of the Los Angeles riots has been public awareness of tensions that for years have smoldered just below the surface between blacks and Korean merchants. This lesson should not be lost. Baltimore officials ought to be working hard right now to heal the rifts that exist here before they erupt in violence.Both Koreans and blacks see themselves as persecuted minorities. But over the years a wall of misunderstanding has built up, owing to differing cultural and historical experiences.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Johns Hopkins University will host a former North Korean detainee, the hiker whose accident was adapted into the movie "127 Hours," and actors from "Breaking Bad" and "The Office," among several other speakers this fall. The university's annual Milton S. Eisenhower Symposium will feature journalist Laura Ling, who was detained in North Korea in 2009; former National Security Adviser Thomas Donilon; hiker Aron Ralston; RJ Mitte, who played Flynn on "Breaking Bad"; and B.J. Novak, who played Ryan on "The Office.
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON and KELLY BREWINGTON,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2005
Kimo Nam, Jae H. Yoon trudged through 12-hour days with no vacation for nearly 30 years after he arrived in the United States from South Korea. But today, the funk is blasting through the speakers, and Yoon joins rows of other retirees dancing the Bump and Grind like it's their business. Afternoon line dancing at the Greenmount Senior Center is an escape for Korean-American retirees such as Yoon, 69. Typically the last person to leave the dance floor, he's a man who relishes the taste of the spiced cabbage known as kimchi as much as he savors a juicy T-bone steak.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Jonathan Bor and Douglas Birch and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writers | July 30, 1995
Leaders of Baltimore's tight-knit Korean community responded with shock and anguish yesterday to Friday's acquittal of a young black man in the slaying of Towson State University student Joel J. Lee."I'm speechless about the outcome of the case," said Jong Park, senior vice president of the Korean-American Grocers Association and a business man in the city's Park Heights section. "How can this be? Where is the justice?"Mr. Park said he fears that the jurors were influenced by the race of the victim, a Korean-American, and the defendant, an African-American.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | February 26, 1995
Immigrant parents can't always draw from their own childhood experiences to help their children.But perhaps they can help each other. That's one of the premises behind an Anne Arundel County pilot program aimed at helping Korean parents learn more about being parents in America.This month about a dozen parents met at Oakwood Elementary School for three 90-minute sessions sponsored by the county school system's Parent Involvement Center.Over lotus bean cakes and Fig Newtons, they chatted in Korean about their children's grades, friends, study habits.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Sun Staff Writer | August 17, 1994
Nearly 200 Korean-Americans rallied outside City Hall yesterday to support a family who has been ordered to leave its West Baltimore grocery to make room for a 250-pupil day-care center.Protesters marched in a large circle on City Hall's cobblestone courtyard, chanted that the city was unfair, and carried signs that read, "City Tramples Small Business," "City Ignores Needs of Korean Business Community" and "No Destruction Without Solution."Leaders of the demonstration, which was designed to gain the grocers more time to remain at the store, said it was the first time in memory that the area's Korean community has marched on City Hall.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | February 12, 1997
Eric Easton says we media folks have it all wrong. He says there we go again, blowing things out of proportion, inventing a crisis where none exists. He didn't quite suggest that we should all be tarred, feathered and run out of town. But he didn't say he was agin it, either.Easton is one of the guys who demonstrated to have Canaan Discount Food Market closed in November. The issue, Easton and the others have insisted all along, was bad food. But there have been charges that the demonstrators had racial motivations, that their problem with Canaan was not bad food but its Korean owner, Eun Mu Lee.Easton wants all of Baltimore to know that he patronizes Korean merchants frequently, thank you very much, probably more so ** than some of the folks who criticized the Canaan pickets.
NEWS
By Ji-Yeon Yuh | February 27, 2002
CHICAGO -- President Bush said it again. During his recent visit to South Korea, he peered at North Korea as he stood in the Demilitarized Zone that separates the two nations, pondered an ax murder of American soldiers in that zone and mused, "No wonder I think it's evil." He called North Korea a despotic regime that starves its citizens and feeds its military. He implied that while he was willing to talk, North Korea was unresponsive. And once again I thought of the North Koreans I have come to know.
NEWS
By Patrick Cha | July 30, 2014
Maryland native Joseph Gantt joined the Army at 18, serving with distinction as a Sergeant First Class in the South Pacific during World War II, even though the military segregated him because of the color of his skin. Gantt had redeployed to the front lines of Korea in December 1950 as a field medic with the 2nd Infantry Division when his unit was overrun by enemy forces. Gantt was thrown into a prison camp and reportedly died there in March 1951. But his wife, Clara Gantt, refused to lose faith.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
Under Armour might start collaborating with smartphone maker Samsung Electronics Co. on wearable fitness devices, according to a South Korean news report. Yonhap News Agency cited market sources in a Wednesday report that said the de facto heir of the South Korean Samsung Group, Lee Jay-yong, met with Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank this month in Seoul. The two business leaders "reportedly discussed ways of countering impact from collaboration between Apple Inc. and Nike Inc. in the wearable devices sector," Yonhap News said.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
Former Oriole Luke Scott was cut from his Korean baseball team, SK Wyverns, Wednesday after reportedly calling his coach, Lee Man-soo, a “liar” and a “coward” in a public confrontation, according to Korean media reports. The Korea Times reported that Scott was put on the reserve team - presumably the disabled list equivalent in Korea - because of plantar fasciitis, and when he went to the clubhouse to gather things from his locker, the confrontation began. After he called out his coach in front of everyone, Scott went straight to reporters to explain his gripes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
 Have you ever wondered what Korean barbecue would taste like on Jewish-style potato latkes? How about a Korean variation on a traditional savory noodle kugel? Well, your wait is almost over. This Thursday, from 7 to 10 p.m., Hersh's and Dooby's are collaborating on a A Jew-sian Mashup , a dinner featuring a number of Jewish-Asian fusion meals like the latkes and kugel dishes, as well as a few side-by-side comparisons, like pork-belly dumplings from Dooby's and kibbeh from Hersh's.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly,The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2014
Suk-min Yoon, the Orioles' free-agent right-hander from South Korea who appeared in two Grapefruit League games after securing his work visa earlier this month, pitched four innings in the Orioles' 4-3 win Saturday against their Triple-A affiliate, the Norfolk Tides. The game was canceled because of persistent rain after the Orioles batted in the top of the sixth. The 27-year Yoon, who has already been sent down to Triple-A and added to Norfolk's rotation, pitched against the Tides lineup and allowed four hits and two runs while walking none and striking out two. He faced the minimum number of batters in three of his innings, but allowed three hits and two runs in the third, which ended with two outs.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. -- South Korean right-hander Suk-min Yoon has yet to pitch in a Grapefruit League game and likely won't until late next week at the earliest. Yoon is slated to spend most of next week in Canada obtaining his work visa. He will fly to Ottawa on Sunday and has an interview appointment on Monday morning. That process is expected to take a few days, but it beats the alternative of Yoon traveling back to South Korea to get his visa - which would involve lengthy travel and missing extended time in camp.
NEWS
By Bruce Wallace and Bruce Wallace,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 11, 2007
SEOUL, South Korea -- Under normal circumstances, South Korean presidential candidate Lee Myung-bak's overwhelming lead in the polls would leave him coasting to victory in December's election. Instead, he sees nothing but land mines on the path to power - from a threatened late entry of a heavyweight challenger to the possibility that he soon might be under investigation for financial fraud. Lee won a bitterly contested race to become the nominee of the conservative Grand National Party (GNP)
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1998
Ask many of the city's Korean-American merchants and their largely African-American customers if there is tension between them -- tension mirrored in explosive incidents across the country -- and the likely response will be a quick, definitive "No."But such a response may tell only half the truth. In reality, city and neighborhood activists are closely monitoring black-Korean relations, a fact that reveals more concern than some seem willing to acknowledge.City officials have twice sponsored meetings this year to defuse tension between the two communities.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. - The Orioles introduced South Korean pitcher Suk-min Yoon to the media on Tuesday afternoon at the Ed Smith Stadium Complex. Yoon was flanked  by Orioles manager Buck Showalter, executive vice president Dan Duquette and his agent Tad Yo, who served as his interpreter. Here is a transcript of what Yoon had to say: On how familiar he is with the Orioles: “I know about Cal Ripken, Jr. having the longest per game streak, continuously. I knows about that.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
SARASOTA, FLA. - Suk-min Yoon spent his childhood in South Korea idolizing fellow countryman Chan Ho Park as he became the first South Korean-born player to pitch the major leagues, all while hoping that one day he could follow in Park's footsteps. The 27-year-old right-hander's dream got closer to reality Tuesday, when the Orioles formally introduced him to the media, making Yoon the first player in franchise history to be born in South Korea. "I worked hard to get to that goal, and now that I'm here," Yoon said through agent Tad Hun Yo, who also served as an interpreter.
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