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By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
Former Oriole Luke Scott was cut from his Korean baseball team, SK Wyverns, Wednesday after reportedly calling his coach, Lee Man-soo, a “liar” and a “coward” in a public confrontation, according to Korean media reports. The Korea Times reported that Scott was put on the reserve team - presumably the disabled list equivalent in Korea - because of plantar fasciitis, and when he went to the clubhouse to gather things from his locker, the confrontation began. After he called out his coach in front of everyone, Scott went straight to reporters to explain his gripes.
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By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
Former Oriole Luke Scott was cut from his Korean baseball team, SK Wyverns, Wednesday after reportedly calling his coach, Lee Man-soo, a “liar” and a “coward” in a public confrontation, according to Korean media reports. The Korea Times reported that Scott was put on the reserve team - presumably the disabled list equivalent in Korea - because of plantar fasciitis, and when he went to the clubhouse to gather things from his locker, the confrontation began. After he called out his coach in front of everyone, Scott went straight to reporters to explain his gripes.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,SUN REPORTER | July 8, 2006
For the second time this year, Maryland Comptroller William Donald Schaefer is making national news, but this time he's doing it in Korean. The former governor's comments this week linking the North Korean government's launch of a long-range missile with the English education of Korean immigrants is drawing nationwide coverage in the Korean-language news media and causing dismay among Maryland's Korean-American voters. "It's offending most of the Koreans that we have here," said David Han, president of the Korean Society of Maryland.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,SUN REPORTER | July 8, 2006
For the second time this year, Maryland Comptroller William Donald Schaefer is making national news, but this time he's doing it in Korean. The former governor's comments this week linking the North Korean government's launch of a long-range missile with the English education of Korean immigrants is drawing nationwide coverage in the Korean-language news media and causing dismay among Maryland's Korean-American voters. "It's offending most of the Koreans that we have here," said David Han, president of the Korean Society of Maryland.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 11, 2002
WASHINGTON - President Bush's branding of Iran, Iraq and North Korea as an "axis of evil" continues to echo around the world, provoking a mixture of fright, confusion and derision from some of America's longtime friends. Officials and commentators abroad worry that the United States is about to strike out militarily against its perceived enemies in a way that could harm its allies and disrupt their national agendas. The president's phrase also has drawn perplexed frowns from those who wonder why three disparate regimes were lumped together.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2000
Kuk Jong Kim strutted out of Lee's Barbershop in Baltimore's "Koreatown" neighborhood yesterday, paused for a moment before a small crowd and dramatically held up the front page of the Korea Times showing a color picture of North and South Korea's presidents shaking hands. Standing on North Charles Street, Kim was thousands of miles from the action, but seemed to claim this victory as his own. The two presidents of his divided homeland had met for the first time and were groping toward peace.
NEWS
By GEORGIE ANNE GEYER JTC | July 19, 1995
Seoul, South Korea -- WHEN THE POSH, pink "modern" Sampoong Department Store here simply collapsed on June 29, newspaper columnists noted in the midst of the sorrow that shook this little nation that the store's name meant in Korean "abundant things."And there you have the tragic irony of the "accident" that is thought to have killed at least 400 people. This nation, which has known almost nothing but 1,000 years of defeat, has become, incredibly, the 12th richest country on Earth. The founder of Korea's mammoth Hyundai conglomerate was just named one of the world's 10 richest men, but the country itself seems to be falling down around the heads of these hard-working people.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 21, 2002
SEOUL, South Korea - In a case that has sparked the largest anti-American rallies seen here in years, an Army sergeant was acquitted yesterday in a U.S. military court of criminal negligence in the deaths of two South Korean girls who were crushed by a 50-ton armored vehicle. Sgt. Fernando Nino, the vehicle's commander, was found not guilty of negligent homicide in the deaths of Shim Mi-son and Shin Hyo-soon, both 14, who were hit on a narrow road north of Seoul. Today, a military jury will hear the case of the vehicle's driver, Sgt. Mark Walker.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker | jeff.barker@baltsun.com | January 6, 2010
Maryland forward Jin Soo Choi is leaving school to return home to South Korea. A source close to Choi said he was having difficulty balancing academics and basketball. "After speaking with my family, we decided it would be best to continue my basketball career in Korea," Choi said in a news release. "I want to thank the coaches and especially Coach [ Gary] Williams for giving me an opportunity to play basketball at a high level." Choi, a 6-foot-8 sophomore, had played sparingly this season.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,jeff.barker@baltsun.com | January 6, 2010
Maryland forward Jin Soo Choi is leaving school to return home to South Korea. A source close to Choi said he was having difficulty balancing academics and basketball. "After speaking with my family, we decided it would be best to continue my basketball career in Korea," Choi said in a news release. "I want to thank the coaches and especially Coach [Gary] Williams for giving me an opportunity to play basketball at a high level." Choi, a 6-foot-8 sophomore, had played sparingly this season.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 11, 2002
WASHINGTON - President Bush's branding of Iran, Iraq and North Korea as an "axis of evil" continues to echo around the world, provoking a mixture of fright, confusion and derision from some of America's longtime friends. Officials and commentators abroad worry that the United States is about to strike out militarily against its perceived enemies in a way that could harm its allies and disrupt their national agendas. The president's phrase also has drawn perplexed frowns from those who wonder why three disparate regimes were lumped together.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2000
Kuk Jong Kim strutted out of Lee's Barbershop in Baltimore's "Koreatown" neighborhood yesterday, paused for a moment before a small crowd and dramatically held up the front page of the Korea Times showing a color picture of North and South Korea's presidents shaking hands. Standing on North Charles Street, Kim was thousands of miles from the action, but seemed to claim this victory as his own. The two presidents of his divided homeland had met for the first time and were groping toward peace.
NEWS
By GEORGIE ANNE GEYER JTC | July 19, 1995
Seoul, South Korea -- WHEN THE POSH, pink "modern" Sampoong Department Store here simply collapsed on June 29, newspaper columnists noted in the midst of the sorrow that shook this little nation that the store's name meant in Korean "abundant things."And there you have the tragic irony of the "accident" that is thought to have killed at least 400 people. This nation, which has known almost nothing but 1,000 years of defeat, has become, incredibly, the 12th richest country on Earth. The founder of Korea's mammoth Hyundai conglomerate was just named one of the world's 10 richest men, but the country itself seems to be falling down around the heads of these hard-working people.
NEWS
December 4, 2006
Kwanik Kenneth Paik, photojournalist, editor Kwanik Kenneth Paik, an award-winning photojournalist who later became an editor at The Sun and The Evening Sun, and a newspaper columnist, died of acute myelogenous leukemia Nov. 27 in Los Angeles. Born in Seoul, South Korea, Mr. Paik immigrated to the United States in 1963, received a graduate degree in journalism from the University of Missouri and embarked on a career that took him around the world. After working in the photo and graphic departments at newspapers in Kansas and Florida, he became photo director at the Sunpapers in 1983 and later became The Evening Sun's assistant managing editor for news.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | July 31, 1991
Working 12- to 14-hour days, six days in a row, doesn't keep the county's Korean Christians from church. It makes them desperate to go.Sunday church for these families has become the high point in a hard week, a few hours of security where everyone speaks their language and knows their ways, say Korean pastors and parishioners."
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