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By New York Times News Service | December 5, 1993
WASHINGTON -- North Korea's new offer to allow greater access to its nuclear sites restricts international inspectors at the two most critical installations, leaving the Clinton administration divided over how to respond, administration officials said yesterday.The administration has scheduled a Cabinet-level "principals" meeting tomorrow to try to fashion a response, officials said.After a day of careful examination of the North Korean offer, American specialists disclosed details of the plan yesterday, saying it contained some serious deficiencies.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 29, 2008
SEOUL, South Korea -- North Korea test-fired a barrage of short-range missiles off its western coast yesterday, while threatening to slow further the disablement of its nuclear weapons facilities if the United States continues to demand a fuller accounting of its nuclear activities. South Korea played down the missile launches, saying they were part of the Communist state's routine military training. It did not give details about the type and number of rockets fired by the North. But experts said Pyongyang was seeking to boost its bargaining leverage by escalating tensions at a time that negotiations with Washington over North Korea's nuclear program are not proceeding in its favor and South Korea is becoming less generous with economic aid. North Korea's first and only nuclear test in October 2006 gave rise to international concern about its missile capabilities.
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NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | February 11, 1994
Vienna. -- The next deadline in the nuclear dueling between Washington and Pyongyang is 10 days off, ready or not. February 21 is the date the experts must report to the governing board of the International Atomic Energy Agency on the state of affairs, as they discern it, in North Korea's nuclear establishment.They appear to have no choice but to say they are unable to carry out their mandate to inspect North Korea's nuclear facilities, and that there is no good reason not to believe that the country is engaged in the clandestine manufacture of a nuclear weapon.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 13, 2007
. BEIJING --The United States and four other nations reached a tentative agreement today to provide North Korea with roughly $400 million in fuel oil, economic aid and humanitarian assistance, in return for the North to start to disable its nuclear facilities and allow nuclear inspectors back into the country, according to U.S. officials who have reviewed a proposed text. While the accord sets a 60-day deadline for the North to accomplish those first steps toward disarmament, it leaves until an undefined future moment - and to another negotiation - the actual removal of North Korea's nuclear weapons and the fuel that it has manufactured to produce them.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 16, 1994
WASHINGTON -- North Korea has blocked a full inspection of the most sensitive part of its nuclear program, raising new suspicions that it is seeking to produce an atomic-weapons arsenal, U.S. officials and diplomats said yesterday.International inspectors, who left North Korea on Monday, were barred from taking some of the samples they needed from the heart of the North's nuclear program: a reprocessing facility that separates plutonium from spent nuclear fuel.The inspectors also found that some seals placed at nuclear facilities to prevent diversion of nuclear fuel were not intact.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 8, 2003
WASHINGTON - President Bush urged China yesterday to help end the nuclear standoff with North Korea and said he remained confident that diplomacy would defuse the crisis. But he didn't rule out the possibility of a military attack on North Korea's nuclear sites. "All options are on the table, but I believe we can solve this diplomatically," he said, adding that North Korean leader Kim Jong Il "must comply with the world's demand that he not develop a nuclear weapon." North Korea warned yesterday through the official news agency KCNA of "horrible nuclear disasters" if the United States threatens Pyongyang militarily.
NEWS
By Sonni Efron and Sam Howe Verhovek and Sonni Efron and Sam Howe Verhovek,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 29, 2003
BEIJING - Efforts to arrange talks among North Korea, China and the United States have bogged down, and negotiations might not be held any time soon, U.S. and South Korean officials said yesterday. "The consultation process between North Korea and China is not swift and is becoming a bit slower," South Korean Foreign Minister Yoon Young Kwan told reporters in Seoul. Yoon's downbeat assessment was shared by U.S. Undersecretary of State John R. Bolton, who was visiting Beijing for talks about North Korea's nuclear weapons program.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 4, 2005
BEIJING - Two members of Congress returning yesterday from a visit to North Korea warned the country's government that an American public traumatized by Hurricane Katrina was in no mood for any more lengthy negotiations over North Korea's nuclear program. The congressmen - Rep. Tom Lantos, a California Democrat, and Rep. Jim Leach, an Iowa Republican - said they had urged North Korean officials to dispense with any belabored negotiating tactics and quickly agree on a statement of shared principles when the six-nation nuclear talks resume this month.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 13, 2007
. BEIJING --The United States and four other nations reached a tentative agreement today to provide North Korea with roughly $400 million in fuel oil, economic aid and humanitarian assistance, in return for the North to start to disable its nuclear facilities and allow nuclear inspectors back into the country, according to U.S. officials who have reviewed a proposed text. While the accord sets a 60-day deadline for the North to accomplish those first steps toward disarmament, it leaves until an undefined future moment - and to another negotiation - the actual removal of North Korea's nuclear weapons and the fuel that it has manufactured to produce them.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 5, 1994
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton stepped up efforts yesterday to increase diplomatic pressure on North Korea by calling it "virtually imperative" that the world community impose economic sanctions on Asia's nuclear renegade.With British Prime Minister John Major by his side during a D-Day appearance in Portsmouth, England, Mr. Clinton sought to quell talk of armed conflict, saying sanctions were "clearly . . . not an act of war and should not be seen as such."But North Korea's ambassador in Beijing, Chu Chang Jun, repeated warnings yesterday that "any kind of economic sanctions" against North Korea would be regarded as "a declaration of war."
NEWS
By Siobhan Gorman and Siobhan Gorman,Sun reporter | October 12, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Amid the burgeoning debate and partisan finger-pointing over North Korea's nuclear weapons program, former national security officials say that missed opportunities over the past three administrations - Republican and Democratic - could have ended or significantly stunted Pyongyang's effort. "It doesn't mean it's our fault, but it means we have missed opportunities to head it off," said Jon Wolfsthal, who was an Energy Department monitor at North Korea's Yongbyon nuclear complex during the Clinton administration.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 4, 2005
BEIJING - Two members of Congress returning yesterday from a visit to North Korea warned the country's government that an American public traumatized by Hurricane Katrina was in no mood for any more lengthy negotiations over North Korea's nuclear program. The congressmen - Rep. Tom Lantos, a California Democrat, and Rep. Jim Leach, an Iowa Republican - said they had urged North Korean officials to dispense with any belabored negotiating tactics and quickly agree on a statement of shared principles when the six-nation nuclear talks resume this month.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 27, 2003
BEIJING - Diplomats from six nations began meetings here this morning about North Korea's nuclear program but at a table with so many agendas, analysts say, that the best hopes for any meaningful progress rest on the diplomacy of one country in particular: China. None of the participants - the United States, Japan, Russia, China and the two Koreas - has given any indication that the three days of talks will produce anything substantive. Beyond hopes for more talks, analysts said, the best-case scenario would be a statement at the end of the talks in which North Korea declares a willingness to end its nuclear program in the future, and the other nations declare interest in aiding Pyongyang and assuring its security.
NEWS
By Sonni Efron and Sam Howe Verhovek and Sonni Efron and Sam Howe Verhovek,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 29, 2003
BEIJING - Efforts to arrange talks among North Korea, China and the United States have bogged down, and negotiations might not be held any time soon, U.S. and South Korean officials said yesterday. "The consultation process between North Korea and China is not swift and is becoming a bit slower," South Korean Foreign Minister Yoon Young Kwan told reporters in Seoul. Yoon's downbeat assessment was shared by U.S. Undersecretary of State John R. Bolton, who was visiting Beijing for talks about North Korea's nuclear weapons program.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 12, 2003
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia - A top Russian diplomat said yesterday that a nuclear North Korea would be against Russia's national interests and that the Kremlin would re-evaluate its opposition to international sanctions should the North Koreans develop nuclear weapons. The statements by Deputy Foreign Minister Alexander Losyukov, who was the Kremlin's emissary to North Korea during a diplomatic mission in January, amounted to a warning to North Korea that patience was ebbing in one of the few nations that has offered it sympathy during a five-month nuclear crisis with the United States.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 8, 2003
WASHINGTON - President Bush urged China yesterday to help end the nuclear standoff with North Korea and said he remained confident that diplomacy would defuse the crisis. But he didn't rule out the possibility of a military attack on North Korea's nuclear sites. "All options are on the table, but I believe we can solve this diplomatically," he said, adding that North Korean leader Kim Jong Il "must comply with the world's demand that he not develop a nuclear weapon." North Korea warned yesterday through the official news agency KCNA of "horrible nuclear disasters" if the United States threatens Pyongyang militarily.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 15, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Administration officials say that the first specialists to conduct a detailed survey of North Korea's nuclear installations have confirmed that the country has been building a large plutonium reprocessing plant but that the inspectors have so far found no evidence that enough nuclear material has been produced to make an atomic bomb.The preliminary findings, expected to be announced in Vienna at a meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency that begins today, cast doubt on the CIA's worst-case estimates that the hard-line Communist government could become a nuclear power within a year.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 5, 2003
SEOUL, South Korea - South Korea's National Security Council worked yesterday on a compromise proposal to ease the standoff over North Korea's nuclear weapons program, spurred by warnings from North Korea's state-run media that "the present situation is very serious and unpredictable." The proposal, which will be submitted to U.S. and Japanese officials in Washington tomorrow, is part of a broader effort by South Korea to mediate between its ally, the United States, and its former nemesis, North Korea.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 5, 2003
SEOUL, South Korea - South Korea's National Security Council worked yesterday on a compromise proposal to ease the standoff over North Korea's nuclear weapons program, spurred by warnings from North Korea's state-run media that "the present situation is very serious and unpredictable." The proposal, which will be submitted to U.S. and Japanese officials in Washington tomorrow, is part of a broader effort by South Korea to mediate between its ally, the United States, and its former nemesis, North Korea.
NEWS
By Jonathan Power | July 26, 1996
TOKYO -- When Congress decided last month to reduce from $25 million to $15 million this year's American payment to buy off North Korea's nuclear-arms program, it recharged Japan's own vigorous ongoing debate. Does a potential North Korean nuclear threat alter Japan's traditional pacifist posture on nuclear arms and push it to develop a military establishment comparable to its economic power?Japan, after all, has often been the subject of direct threats from North Korea. It falls within the range of the new North Korean No-dong 1 missile (and the No-dong 2 under development)
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