Advertisement
HomeCollectionsKoop
IN THE NEWS

Koop

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Sandy Grady | May 4, 1995
Washington -- A TELEVISED showdown, a career on the line, the president's clout at stake, left vs. right zanies screaming.Yep, the nomination fight of Dr. Henry Foster to be surgeon general is one of those high-decibel dramas that jacks up adrenalin in the Imperial City.Also much ado about nothing.While rhetorical bang-bang over Dr. Foster goes into the nuclear range, stop for a question:Why in the world do we need a surgeon general?I mean, why pay a doc $130,000, dress him or her in a Gilbert & Sullivan uniform, and react as though every utterance came from Olympus?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frank Schaeffer | June 2, 2009
My late father and I share part of the blame for the murder of Dr. George Tiller, the abortion doctor gunned down on Sunday. Until I got out of the religious right (in the mid-1980s) and repented of my former hate-filled rhetoric, I was both a leader of the so-called pro-life movement and a part of a Republican Party hate machine masquerading as the moral conscience of America. In the late 1970s, my father, evangelical pro-life leader Francis Schaeffer, along with Dr. C. Everett Koop (who soon become surgeon general in the Reagan administration)
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 25, 1993
A nationwide outreach program will be launched today to battle the No. 1 killer of children under 14 in the United States -- preventable injuries."Never before have so many people come together to fight this terrible epidemic that kills 8,000 and disables 50,000 children each year," said C. Everett Koop, former surgeon general and chairman of the National Safe Kids Campaign.Dr. Koop is set to ask the Congress and the Clinton administration today in Washington to make childhood injury prevention part of its public policy agenda.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 20, 2004
A broad coalition of Nobel Peace Prize winners and former U.S. diplomats, allied countries and some of the nation's most influential medical and religious groups pushed the Supreme Court yesterday to abolish the death penalty for teenage killers, pointing to international law and new research on brain development. The court is scheduled to reconsider this fall the question of whether executing killers who committed their crimes at age 16 or 17 is a form of cruel and unusual punishment.
NEWS
By Gerri Kobren | October 20, 1991
KOOPC. Everett Koop.Random House.320 pages. $22.50.No one ever accused Dr. C. Everett Koop of keeping his mouth shut. The former surgeon general of the United States always called it as he saw it, confounding the liberals who opposed his appointment and the conservatives who endorsed it.Nicotine is addictive, he said. AIDS has to be fought with sex education. Using a condom is preferable to dying. Abortion has not been shown to damage the woman's psyche. If contraception information were available to more women, fewer would want to abort.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | June 14, 1991
C. Everett Koop got the surgeon general's job in the Reagan White House largely on the strength of his anti-abortion convictions. But Koop surprised many of his supporters, who ended up denouncing him, by turning out to care more about health than about ideology.That meant, for instance, that if telling people the details of dangerous sexual practices would help stop the spread of AIDS, Koop would do just that, instead of just screaming "Abstinence" into the wind as thousands of names were added to the list of those dying from this epidemic.
NEWS
December 1, 1995
Dr. Charles Everett Koop, surgeon general of the United States during most of the 1980s, was perhaps the most influential person ever to hold that office. Now 79, he remains an important voice in the national health care debate.While in office, he criticized the tobacco industry and he endorsed sex education in schools as a way to prevent the spread of AIDS -- thus becoming one of the few surgeons general sufficiently outspoken to attract both enemies and supporters.Dr. Koop now is head of the C. Everett Koop Foundation, a medical think tank at Dartmouth College; yesterday he was given a $250,000 Heinz award for professional excellence.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | September 27, 1990
Overzealous efforts to hold down health-care costs threaten to turn medicine "into a public utility, over-regulated and under-responsive to the needs of individual patients," C. Everett Koop, the former surgeon general, said yesterday."
NEWS
By Medical Tribune News Service | February 13, 1991
BETHESDA -- Former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop urged scientists yesterday to help the public separate real cancer risks from those that were blown out of proportion.People should concentrate on changes in lifestyle and diet to reduce their risk of getting cancer, Dr. Koop said at a meeting of international cancer experts here."There is a frightening assortment of myths and rumors circulating about cancer risk and prevention," said Dr. Koop, chairman of the conference, which ends today.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | September 26, 1990
There should have been another surgeon general's warning that said, "Beware -- the health system of this country could be dangerous to your health," Dr. C. Everett Koop, the outspoken former surgeon general, told a Baltimore-area audience of several hundred today."
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | June 15, 1999
AmericasDoctor.com Inc., an Owings Mills company that allows computer users to communicate with physicians online, has announced plans to go public.In its filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, the company said proceeds from the offering will be used in part "to fund operating losses."The company, incorporated in August 1997, had an accumulated deficit of $8.1 million as of March 31.The filing said AmericasDoctor.com may use some of the money from the offering "for strategic alliances and acquisitions."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 9, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Clinton administration officials reviewing the proposed tobacco settlement said yesterday that it would impose unacceptable limits on the federal regulation of tobacco products.In the administration's first extensive public comments on the proposal, officials said that the $368.5 billion deal negotiated by state attorneys general, plaintiffs' lawyers and cigarette makers would dilute the Food and Drug Administration's authority to regulate nicotine and place impossible new burdens on the agency.
NEWS
December 1, 1995
Dr. Charles Everett Koop, surgeon general of the United States during most of the 1980s, was perhaps the most influential person ever to hold that office. Now 79, he remains an important voice in the national health care debate.While in office, he criticized the tobacco industry and he endorsed sex education in schools as a way to prevent the spread of AIDS -- thus becoming one of the few surgeons general sufficiently outspoken to attract both enemies and supporters.Dr. Koop now is head of the C. Everett Koop Foundation, a medical think tank at Dartmouth College; yesterday he was given a $250,000 Heinz award for professional excellence.
NEWS
By Sandy Grady | May 4, 1995
Washington -- A TELEVISED showdown, a career on the line, the president's clout at stake, left vs. right zanies screaming.Yep, the nomination fight of Dr. Henry Foster to be surgeon general is one of those high-decibel dramas that jacks up adrenalin in the Imperial City.Also much ado about nothing.While rhetorical bang-bang over Dr. Foster goes into the nuclear range, stop for a question:Why in the world do we need a surgeon general?I mean, why pay a doc $130,000, dress him or her in a Gilbert & Sullivan uniform, and react as though every utterance came from Olympus?
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | May 3, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Dr. Henry Foster Jr. was so earnest, so pleasant and so obviously good-willed in the witness chair yesterday, it seems a shame he will not become our next surgeon general.Even if Foster's nomination gets out of the Labor and Human Resource Committee, it must be confirmed by the Senate.And too many senators are running for president for this to happen.Presidential candidate Sen. Phil Gramm, a Republican from Texas, has promised to filibuster the Foster nomination to kill it.And why should Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole, also running for president, give Phil Gramm all that TV time and allow him to become an even greater hero to the party's anti-abortion right wing?
NEWS
By Tom Teepen | December 13, 1994
PUBLIC OFFICIALS are allowed to tell only three truths in a career, and it was the bad luck, or if you will the bad judgment, of Dr. Joycelyn Elders to use up her allotment in little more than a year as U.S. surgeon general.An extraordinarily accomplished woman, Dr. Elders nonetheless was caught in her third truth last week, forcing President Clinton, who has the grit of Vaseline in these matters, to throw her to the GOP lynch mob that has been hounding her from the start -- before it could catch up with him, too.In her ultimate lapse, Dr. Elders was accused of saying children should be taught to masturbate.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 5, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Dr. C. Everett Koop, the former surgeon general who tried to persuade Americans to give up smoking, now hopes to make them thinner and fitter.Tomorrow, at a press conference at the White House, Dr. Koop is to announce the creation of a prevention campaign called "Shape Up America!" that will produce advertisements and public service announcements to encourage Americans to lose weight.Experts in the obesity field said it would be the first national effort to do something about the escalating weight of Americans, and they generally were enthusiastic about Dr. Koop's plan.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | June 15, 1999
AmericasDoctor.com Inc., an Owings Mills company that allows computer users to communicate with physicians online, has announced plans to go public.In its filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, the company said proceeds from the offering will be used in part "to fund operating losses."The company, incorporated in August 1997, had an accumulated deficit of $8.1 million as of March 31.The filing said AmericasDoctor.com may use some of the money from the offering "for strategic alliances and acquisitions."
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,Special to The Sun | December 6, 1994
Obesity in America is a runaway train.According to C. Everett Koop, former U.S. Surgeon General, in only 10 years obesity has increased from 24 percent to 34 percent in our country's adults. That means 58 million men and women are overweight enough to trigger other serious health problems.Obesity causes up to 97 percent of adult onset diabetes, up to 70 percent of coronary heart disease, 11 percent of breast cancers, 10 percent of colon cancers, a third of hypertension and 70 percent of gallstones.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 5, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Dr. C. Everett Koop, the former surgeon general who tried to persuade Americans to give up smoking, now hopes to make them thinner and fitter.Tomorrow, at a press conference at the White House, Dr. Koop is to announce the creation of a prevention campaign called "Shape Up America!" that will produce advertisements and public service announcements to encourage Americans to lose weight.Experts in the obesity field said it would be the first national effort to do something about the escalating weight of Americans, and they generally were enthusiastic about Dr. Koop's plan.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.