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By Los Angeles Times | April 20, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Los Angeles police Sgt. Stacey Koon, convicted along with Officer Laurence M. Powell in the Rodney G. King civil rights trial, alleged yesterday that acquitted co-defendant Officer Theodore J. Briseno is a "coward," a "rat" and a "traitor."Koon said that Officer Briseno, who broke ranks with his colleagues during an earlier state trial and testified that the policemen were "out of control" when they beat Mr. King, is "out for his own interests.""He'll do whatever he has to do to save his own skin," Koon said during a televised interview on the Fox network's "A Current Affair" program, for which he was paid.
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NEWS
February 5, 2009
On January 31, 2009, WILLIAM STEWART KOONS, SR., of New Windsor; beloved husband of the late Martha E. Hilleary Koons; devoted father of Patricia Dunphy, Finksburg; Susan Britt (Robert), North Wales, PA.; William S. Koons, Jr., Westminster; Kenny Kaye (Leah), Bel Air; grandfather of Martin Dunphy (Beth Anne), Lauren, heather and Sarah Britt, Kenny and Ryan Kaye; great-grandfather of Emma Ruth Dunphy, fiance of Lois Berlau, Dundalk. Funeral service 11 A.M TODAY at St. Luke's Lutheran Church, 701 Green Valley Road, New Windsor.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Daily News | March 24, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Taking the witness stand to tell his dramati story, Los Angeles Police Department Sergeant Stacey Koon said that he did everything he could to use as little force as possible during the violent arrest of Rodney King.Comparing the tense standoff between officers and Mr. King after an early-morning, high-speed chase to a chess game, Sergeant Koon -- the senior officer at the scene -- said yesterday that he carefully reviewed his options before ordering officers into action."What I wanted to do is use the lowest form of force that I could to take Mr. King into custody," Sergeant Koon said when asked by his attorney, Ira Salzman, what was going on his mind during the earliest stages of the March 3, 1991, incident.
NEWS
April 19, 2006
Jean Elizabeth Koons, a retired banker who began a second career as a job counselor with the Baltimore County Department of Aging, died in her sleep Saturday at Manor Care Ruxton. The former Timonium resident was 91. Miss Koons was born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park. She dropped out of Forest Park High School after the ninth grade to go to work to help support her family. "It was because of the Depression," said niece Nancy C. Berry of Timonium. In 1943, Miss Koons began her career at Union Trust Co., working in the bank's proof department.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 21, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Three Los Angeles police officers indicted in the Rodney G. King case have told department investigators that they feared for their lives as they beat and kicked the motorist and were ready to shoot him if necessary.The officers' first detailed account of their actions is contained in a comprehensive 314-page Internal Affairs report on the incident, obtained yesterday by the Los Angeles Times. Compiled with information from 74 separate interviews, the report yields the most complete description yet of what transpired on March 3.Among the highlights:* Sgt. Stacey Koon said he ordered the baton blows because he feared that otherwise, deadly force would have to be used on King.
NEWS
April 5, 1994
Presumed guiltyHad I not read Sgt. Stacey Koon's book, "Presumed Guilty: The Tragedy of the Rodney King Affair," I would have concurred with Wiley A. Hall's commentary of March 24 ("Convict in King beating tries to cash in on crime").After all, I had seen the "beating" on TV dozens of times -- or part of it at least, although with no explanations of exactly what I was seeing or of the portions not shown. And of course we were all exposed to a virtual consensus of a "presumed guilty" opinion in the press.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | April 9, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Colliding images of four police officers as "judge and executioners" versus "sacrificial lambs" were put before jurors by a federal prosecutor and defense lawyer as closing arguments began in the Rodney King police beating trial.The federal civil rights case could go to the jury as early as tonight."The defendants tried Rodney King . . . for being disrespectful to police officers and found him guilty, with Koon as judge and Powell and Wind as executioner," said Assistant U.S. Attorney Steven Clymer, referring to three of the defendants, police Sgt. Stacey Koon, Officer Laurence Powell and former officer Timothy Wind.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | August 9, 1993
Washington.U.S. District Judge John G. Davies strained beyond anything the law should ever allow, to be nice to the two Los Angeles policemen convicted of violating the civil rights of motorist Rodney King by beating him mercilessly.In showing incredible leniency in sentencing Sgt. Stacey C. Koon and Officer Laurence M. Powell, Judge Davies has given dangerous credence to arguments that America's criminal justice system is racially corrupt and unworthy of the respect of minority people.He added explosives to the powder-kegs that endanger virtually every urban area in the land.
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | March 24, 1994
"Fellow American," the letter from Sgt. Stacey C. Koon begins. "Let me be blunt. If you are absolutely, positively convinced that I am guilty as charged in the so-called Rodney King affair, then throw this letter away right now. But if you have the courage to hear the truth and you care about justice being done, read on."I happen to be absolutely, positively convinced that Sergeant Koon is guilty as charged in the "so-called Rodney King affair." But what the heck, I read on anyway."Officer Lawrence Powell and I are the political scapegoats of black radicals and self-serving liberal politicians who know that we are innocent," the letter continues.
NEWS
By Carl T. Rowan | January 12, 1996
BOCA RATON, Fla. -- How much latitude should judges have in sentencing people for serious crimes?Do we accept the fact that no two criminals (or criminal acts) are precisely the same, and conclude that judges must be allowed )) to factor in special circumstances?Or do we say that judges, like most people, have biases that, unless circumscribed by strict guidelines, bring intolerable double and triple standards to law enforcement?Those questions are now before the U.S. Supreme Court as the Rodney King beating case has spun off one more spasm of divisiveness.
NEWS
April 17, 2006
On April 15, 2006, JEAN E. KOONS, 91; beloved daughter of the late William and Ella Koons; dear sister of the late Thelma Williams, Florence Chubb, Parker E. Koons, Sr., Emerson E. Koons and William E. Koons; devoted aunt of Mary Ellen Robinson, Nancy E. Barry, both of Timonium, Parker E. Koons, Jr., of Baltimore, Kenneth Koons, of Lonaconing and Charles G. Brown, of Coral Gables, FL. A Funeral Service will be held Wednesday, April 19, 2006, at 2 :30...
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 9, 2005
NEW YORK - Andy Warhol ironically called his studio The Factory; artist Jeff Koons' studio in the art-crazed Chelsea district is the real thing. Forget about romantic garrets with exposed wooden beams and skylights: Koons' work space is a high-tech engineering lab - a warren of white industrial cubes stuffed chock-a-block with the artist's 40 full-time assistants and their tools and equipment. Here, Koons and his helpers churn out dozens of artworks each year that unapologetically glorify America's materialistic consumer culture: aluminum dolphins, caterpillars, seals and walruses painted to look like inflatable pool toys; resin models of comic book superheroes; computer-designed, hand-painted collages that jumble cartoons, botanical illustrations, inflatables and pop icons in a crazy quilt of old and new, high art and low. And no matter how hard a visitor resists the thought, one question nags: But is it art?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Staff | November 14, 2004
De Kooning: An American Master by Mark Stevens and Annalyn Swan. Alfred A. Knopf. 752 pages. $35. Willem de Kooning, one of the towering figures of 20th-century American art, arrived in New York aboard a British freighter in 1926 as a 22-year-old Dutch stowaway. He was fleeing a troubled childhood of poverty and neglect in his native city of Rotterdam. Over the following decades, he would transform himself from a penniless immigrant who barely spoke English into one of the country's most celebrated artists, achieving undreamed of success just as New York was becoming the cultural capital of the world.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 9, 2001
The popular image of abstract expressionists flinging paint onto their canvases in transports of creative frenzy is one of the enduring myths of modern art, but like most myths, it's mostly hokum. Willem de Kooning, one of the seminal figures of the abstract expressionist movement of the late 1940s and '50s, was renowned for his spontaneous, gestural style and bravura improvisations. Yet his pictures were actually carefully thought out and continually reworked through a prolonged process of reflection and intensive labor.
NEWS
By Carl T. Rowan | January 12, 1996
BOCA RATON, Fla. -- How much latitude should judges have in sentencing people for serious crimes?Do we accept the fact that no two criminals (or criminal acts) are precisely the same, and conclude that judges must be allowed )) to factor in special circumstances?Or do we say that judges, like most people, have biases that, unless circumscribed by strict guidelines, bring intolerable double and triple standards to law enforcement?Those questions are now before the U.S. Supreme Court as the Rodney King beating case has spun off one more spasm of divisiveness.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | December 22, 1995
MIAMI -- The last time Rodney King turned the other cheek, Los Angeles police fractured it for him, so his recent overture to them is, to say the least, surprising. For those who missed it, Mr. King wants to meet face to face with Stacy Koon and Lawrence Powell, the two former Los Angeles police officers who served time for his infamous videotaped 1991 beating. Mr. King told CNN last week he thought it would be ''healthy'' to ask his attackers to ''tell me if you really believe that you had the right to do what you did that night.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | December 22, 1995
MIAMI -- The last time Rodney King turned the other cheek, Los Angeles police fractured it for him, so his recent overture to them is, to say the least, surprising. For those who missed it, Mr. King wants to meet face to face with Stacy Koon and Lawrence Powell, the two former Los Angeles police officers who served time for his infamous videotaped 1991 beating. Mr. King told CNN last week he thought it would be ''healthy'' to ask his attackers to ''tell me if you really believe that you had the right to do what you did that night.
NEWS
August 6, 1993
U.S. District Court Judge John G. Davies' sentencing of Sgt. Stacey Koon and Officer Laurence Powell, the two Los Angeles police officers convicted in the Rodney King beating, was much more lenient than most observers anticipated. They could be out in 26 or 27 months.Federal prosecutors recommended sentences that would have kept one of the officers in prison for at least six years and the other for a minimum of just over seven and a half years. So we are not surprised Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. of the NAACP charged that the sentences "display a wanton disparity, discrimination and inequity based on race.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | May 29, 1994
Paint.Paint itself.Paint for paint's sake.To look at the 76 de Kooning paintings gathered at the National Gallery in "Willem de Kooning: Paintings," is to begin to understand how important paint as paint was to him.Our recognition of that comes partly because we haven't been looking at paint as much as we once did. Since abstract expressionism's heyday in the 1940s and 1950s, we have gone through pop, minimalism and conceptualism -- movements for which paint,...
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