Advertisement
HomeCollectionsKool
IN THE NEWS

Kool

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | April 30, 2013
The Kool & the Gang concert scheduled for next month at the new Aberdeen Proving Ground Federal Credit Union Arena at Harford Community College has been canceled, an HCC spokesperson confirmed Friday. "The cancellation was by mutual consent, and we hope to work with Pyramid Entertainment to schedule a replacement concert in the near future," Nancy Dysard, HCC's director for marketing and public relations, wrote in a e-mail. The concert by the 1970s R&B group was supposed to take place on May 10. Tickets were priced between $50 and $75. Dysard said those who already bought tickets to the concert have two options.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | April 30, 2013
The Kool & the Gang concert scheduled for next month at the new Aberdeen Proving Ground Federal Credit Union Arena at Harford Community College has been canceled, an HCC spokesperson confirmed Friday. "The cancellation was by mutual consent, and we hope to work with Pyramid Entertainment to schedule a replacement concert in the near future," Nancy Dysard, HCC's director for marketing and public relations, wrote in a e-mail. The concert by the 1970s R&B group was supposed to take place on May 10. Tickets were priced between $50 and $75. Dysard said those who already bought tickets to the concert have two options.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | March 1, 1998
In the glamorous world of horse racing, where big bucks often buy the best horse, fairy tales come true, too.Margaret Crews, 26, stood dazed in the winner's circle yesterday at Laurel Park after a horse her husband Nelson bought for $1,300 won the $66,275 St. Brendan Stakes, earning the Crews $39,765.The horse, Kool Krafty, is the only horse they own. Nelson, when he's not training him, drives a dump truck. Five days ago, Margaret gave birth to the couple's first child.The tiny girl, Helen, nestled in the arms of Margaret's sister outside the winner's circle as Margaret told the endearing story of her husband's purchase of Kool Krafty, a 5-year-old gelding nobody else wanted.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | May 20, 2008
The Orioles rode the train up to New York yesterday, undoubtedly hoping that everything everyone has been saying about the struggling Yankees is true. The standings say so. The Yankees will enter tonight's series opener against the Orioles at Yankee Stadium anchored in the American League East cellar, the only team in the division with a losing record. It's not the first time, of course. They got off to an awful start last year but recovered and reached the playoffs. That could happen again -- because they've still got more money than whatever deity you believe in -- but the buzz in the Big Apple is that this time might be different.
NEWS
July 20, 1994
Television tries always to project personality. Yet few credible personalities ever emerge. One that survived in Baltimore, from one generation to the next, was Stu Kerr, now dead at 66. He was best known for comic improvisation for kids -- Bozo the Clown, Professor Kool, Commander Stukker. But Stu Kerr did it all, straight announcing, the weather, news, fund-raising. Whether the viewer saw Professor Kool or Stu Kerr, there was no mistaking him for someone else, and no forgetting. He brought a thousand chuckles, a million smiles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MARC SHAPIRO | July 13, 2006
The Roots The Roots' Kool Tour hits Rams Head Live on Saturday with Talib Kweli and the Pharcyde. The band is known for its jazzy hip-hop, which uses live instruments rather than samples and programmed beats. Rams Head Live is at 20 Market Place at Power Plant Live. Doors open at 9 p.m., and the show starts at 10 p.m. Tickets are $22 in advance and $26 Saturday. This show is 18 and older. Call 410-547-7328 or visit ticketmaster.com.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2004
The maker of Kool cigarettes have agreed to curtail a hip hop-themed marketing campaign and donate $1.46 million to anti-smoking causes to settle a lawsuit brought by Maryland and two other states. Maryland sued Brown & Williamson Corp. in July, claiming that a campaign for the mentholated Kool brand was aimed at minors in violation of a 1998 master settlement agreement between tobacco companies and most states. The company has since been acquired by R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. "As the nation's leading cause of preventable death, tobacco kills over 45,000 African-Americans each year," Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. said in a statement announcing the settlement.
NEWS
By Colleen M. Webster | September 18, 1996
I. FallYour father sat you on the stairs,banisters barring you fromthe plunge down.You were sixwhen he faced you, explainedlovemarriagelossdivorce.And when he rose to go,he leftyouhigh on those boards,plummetingthroughtraining wheels,braces,Keds,puddles,report cards,dating.II. HoldI remember hall oak stepsbearing our weight in late July,two small sisters with grape mustaches, learningKool Aid swish from our father, our crew-cutsharp-spined boss who lurched his bodyto pronounce the belly gurgle we giggledover, repeated, practiced in the humidity.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | August 15, 1993
Ask the average pop fan to trace the development of rock and roll through the '60s and '70s, and he or she will immediately recall the way the music moved from the British Invasion into psychedelia, or how punk rock pushed aside pomp rock at the end of the '70s. It's easy to remember stuff like that, because rock and roll did all of its growing up in public.Ask the same person to outline the progress of R&B, however, and a different picture emerges. Motown and Stax? Everybody knows that stuff.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | May 20, 2008
The Orioles rode the train up to New York yesterday, undoubtedly hoping that everything everyone has been saying about the struggling Yankees is true. The standings say so. The Yankees will enter tonight's series opener against the Orioles at Yankee Stadium anchored in the American League East cellar, the only team in the division with a losing record. It's not the first time, of course. They got off to an awful start last year but recovered and reached the playoffs. That could happen again -- because they've still got more money than whatever deity you believe in -- but the buzz in the Big Apple is that this time might be different.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MARC SHAPIRO | July 13, 2006
The Roots The Roots' Kool Tour hits Rams Head Live on Saturday with Talib Kweli and the Pharcyde. The band is known for its jazzy hip-hop, which uses live instruments rather than samples and programmed beats. Rams Head Live is at 20 Market Place at Power Plant Live. Doors open at 9 p.m., and the show starts at 10 p.m. Tickets are $22 in advance and $26 Saturday. This show is 18 and older. Call 410-547-7328 or visit ticketmaster.com.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2005
Gravity-defying trapeze artists. Animals performing tricks at a trainer's command. A zany, obnoxious clown and a ringmaster orchestrating the show with powerful orations. That's the circus Baltimore native Cedric Walker relished when his mother took him to the big top as a child. The UniverSoul Circus is his remix. The creator of the 11-year-old traveling show, which begins a six-day run at Security Square Mall tonight, includes all the mainstays that circus enthusiasts have come to love.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2004
The maker of Kool cigarettes have agreed to curtail a hip hop-themed marketing campaign and donate $1.46 million to anti-smoking causes to settle a lawsuit brought by Maryland and two other states. Maryland sued Brown & Williamson Corp. in July, claiming that a campaign for the mentholated Kool brand was aimed at minors in violation of a 1998 master settlement agreement between tobacco companies and most states. The company has since been acquired by R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. "As the nation's leading cause of preventable death, tobacco kills over 45,000 African-Americans each year," Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. said in a statement announcing the settlement.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | March 1, 1998
In the glamorous world of horse racing, where big bucks often buy the best horse, fairy tales come true, too.Margaret Crews, 26, stood dazed in the winner's circle yesterday at Laurel Park after a horse her husband Nelson bought for $1,300 won the $66,275 St. Brendan Stakes, earning the Crews $39,765.The horse, Kool Krafty, is the only horse they own. Nelson, when he's not training him, drives a dump truck. Five days ago, Margaret gave birth to the couple's first child.The tiny girl, Helen, nestled in the arms of Margaret's sister outside the winner's circle as Margaret told the endearing story of her husband's purchase of Kool Krafty, a 5-year-old gelding nobody else wanted.
NEWS
By Colleen M. Webster | September 18, 1996
I. FallYour father sat you on the stairs,banisters barring you fromthe plunge down.You were sixwhen he faced you, explainedlovemarriagelossdivorce.And when he rose to go,he leftyouhigh on those boards,plummetingthroughtraining wheels,braces,Keds,puddles,report cards,dating.II. HoldI remember hall oak stepsbearing our weight in late July,two small sisters with grape mustaches, learningKool Aid swish from our father, our crew-cutsharp-spined boss who lurched his bodyto pronounce the belly gurgle we giggledover, repeated, practiced in the humidity.
NEWS
July 20, 1994
Television tries always to project personality. Yet few credible personalities ever emerge. One that survived in Baltimore, from one generation to the next, was Stu Kerr, now dead at 66. He was best known for comic improvisation for kids -- Bozo the Clown, Professor Kool, Commander Stukker. But Stu Kerr did it all, straight announcing, the weather, news, fund-raising. Whether the viewer saw Professor Kool or Stu Kerr, there was no mistaking him for someone else, and no forgetting. He brought a thousand chuckles, a million smiles.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 20, 1994
We sat in his house as spring came to Baltimore and Stu Kerr, trussed into a steel brace that supported his upper body, talked almost breathlessly and told jokes and stories about radio days, and it was as if we were old friends.He spoke of his father, back in New York, and how that hard-working Scot didn't understand his boy's interest in broadcasting. He spoke of Manhattan, breaking out in the biz, picking up a job, playing with microphones, working on his delivery, landing at a station in Annapolis, working with men who later became legends of Maryland broadcasting themselves.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | March 20, 1992
If the first few games are any indication, "Road To The Final Four" may indeed be the hit of the anywhere-but-Broadway season. This is heartening, especially since CBS is shoving 35 hours of hoops our way this weekend.Generally, after all the David vs. Goliath nonsense dies down and the top-rated teams get rolling after usual doddering starts, opening-round pairings have a tendency to resemble intra-squad games. Not the Georgetown, North Carolina, Seton Hall and Arkansas opening acts yesterday.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 20, 1994
We sat in his house as spring came to Baltimore and Stu Kerr, trussed into a steel brace that supported his upper body, talked almost breathlessly and told jokes and stories about radio days, and it was as if we were old friends.He spoke of his father, back in New York, and how that hard-working Scot didn't understand his boy's interest in broadcasting. He spoke of Manhattan, breaking out in the biz, picking up a job, playing with microphones, working on his delivery, landing at a station in Annapolis, working with men who later became legends of Maryland broadcasting themselves.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | August 15, 1993
Ask the average pop fan to trace the development of rock and roll through the '60s and '70s, and he or she will immediately recall the way the music moved from the British Invasion into psychedelia, or how punk rock pushed aside pomp rock at the end of the '70s. It's easy to remember stuff like that, because rock and roll did all of its growing up in public.Ask the same person to outline the progress of R&B, however, and a different picture emerges. Motown and Stax? Everybody knows that stuff.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.