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NEWS
By Jane Meredith Adams and Jane Meredith Adams,Special to The Sun | May 30, 1994
SKYLONDA, Calif. -- They met through video dating, when the sight of his muscular build drove her so wild she smacked kisses all over the monitor. Never mind his rowdy past, his other mates, his penchant for projectile vomiting when annoyed. True love forgives.Now the young couple would like to start a family, part animal urge, part science project. For she is Koko, the world-famous gorilla and two-time National Geographic cover star who wowed the public in the 1970s by learning to communicate with humans using American Sign Language.
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FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2011
With the air becoming crisp and the leaves about to change, wouldn't it be nice to take the dog on a hike -- or perhaps a camping trip? Today the Unleashed Testing Panel is taking on a product made to take along on occasions like this: The Kakadu Pet Adventure Mat. The fluffy cotton and polyester Kakadu mat is designed to keep your pet comfortable indoors or outdoors. But the company shows the mat off as something for outdoorsy people who want to bring along their dogs. The mat, which comes in a number of colors, retails for about $60. Leslie and her Pug, Koko, tested the Kakadu mat on a camping adventure.
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FEATURES
August 26, 1998
"I like 'Koko's Kitten' by Francine Patterson. She taught a female baby gorilla American Sign Language. American Sign Language is used by deaf people in order to talk with their hands. When Dr. Patterson ask Koko what she wanted on her 12th birthday, Koko signed 'cat.' "- Lanika HinesSeneca Elementary"If you like books about angels, you will like 'The High Rise Glorious Skittle Skat Roarious Sky Pie Angel Food Cake' by Nancy Willard. It is about a girl who tries to make a cake for her mother with her great-grandmother's recipe.
NEWS
November 19, 2007
Patrols at Towson U. ramp up amid threat University police are stepping up campus police patrols this week after an anonymous threat indicated something would happen today at Linthicum Hall, a spokeswoman said yesterday. Police are investigating the threat, received Friday, involving the liberal arts classroom building near the center of campus, said Carol Vellucci, assistant for communications to University President Robert L. Caret. Although the threat "did not seem to have a high level of credibility," Vellucci said, officials sent an e-mail and text message to students and posted a notice on the university Web site.
NEWS
July 16, 2007
THE COUNT Homicides since Jan. 1: 173 At 11:55 p.m. yesterday, a man, 18, was shot on Koko Lane in Walbrook. A man was shot about 10:30 p.m. yesterday in the 5700 block of Radecke Ave. in Northeast Baltimore. A man was shot about 4 a.m. yesterday in the 2300 block of E. North Ave. A man was shot Saturday in the 2800 block of Boarman Ave. in Park Heights.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2011
With the air becoming crisp and the leaves about to change, wouldn't it be nice to take the dog on a hike -- or perhaps a camping trip? Today the Unleashed Testing Panel is taking on a product made to take along on occasions like this: The Kakadu Pet Adventure Mat. The fluffy cotton and polyester Kakadu mat is designed to keep your pet comfortable indoors or outdoors. But the company shows the mat off as something for outdoorsy people who want to bring along their dogs. The mat, which comes in a number of colors, retails for about $60. Leslie and her Pug, Koko, tested the Kakadu mat on a camping adventure.
NEWS
March 1, 2000
"In 'Tall Tale: The Unbelievable Adventures of Pecos Bill,' Daniel lived in Paradise Valley. He hated living there and wished he could be anyplace else. The part I liked was when he was chasing a nice-looking horse, but it really was a car." -- LaByanca Harvey Grove Park Elementary " 'Koko's Kitten' is a good book because the author Francine Patterson talks about a real gorilla. Koko knows how to communicate in American Sign Language. The photographs are great." -- Michael Dimick Seneca Elementary "I read a book called 'Amber Brown Goes Fourth' by Paula Danziger.
BUSINESS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2000
Straw-bale construction has been around for centuries and was widely used in Ireland, Scotland and other parts of Europe. It was also extensively used in the United States as settlers pushed their way to California, said Bob Armstrong, a plant geneticist who led the now-defunct Alternative Agricultural Research and Commercialization Corporation, a federally funded venture capital group that invested in alternative technologies. "It's a very old technology that folks used when we were settling the West," Armstrong said.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Jessica Valdez and Heather Dewar and Jessica Valdez,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2003
A 6-year-old boy was shot and maimed yesterday after he and his little brother found a loaded gun in the living room of the Baltimore house where they were staying, in the 2100 block of Koko Lane. The 6-year-old, whose name was being withheld by police, was listed in good condition at Johns Hopkins Hospital yesterday, but Baltimore Chief of Detectives Edwin Day said a bullet tore off three fingers on the boy's left hand, and doctors could not reattach the fingers because they were too badly mangled by the blast.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson and Jill Hudson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Dan Morse contributed to this article | August 27, 1997
The major motion picture being filmed right here in Howard County -- who knew? -- will take to the streets of Columbia tomorrow night as the movie's crew makes a rare public appearance, apparently to shoot a car chase.The producers of "Species 2" -- a sequel to the 1995 science-fiction horror movie "Species" -- have accomplished the seemingly impossible by getting a large billboard erected on the otherwise sign-free streets of Columbia.But for the most part, their work has attracted little notice beyond the businesses that have benefited from the money they are leaving behind.
NEWS
July 16, 2007
THE COUNT Homicides since Jan. 1: 173 At 11:55 p.m. yesterday, a man, 18, was shot on Koko Lane in Walbrook. A man was shot about 10:30 p.m. yesterday in the 5700 block of Radecke Ave. in Northeast Baltimore. A man was shot about 4 a.m. yesterday in the 2300 block of E. North Ave. A man was shot Saturday in the 2800 block of Boarman Ave. in Park Heights.
NEWS
By JOSH MITCHELL and JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTER | October 21, 2005
Speaking for the first time since he was swept up in a terror probe, the owner of a Southeast Baltimore convenience store said yesterday he knows of no plots to blow up a Baltimore tunnel, and he criticized federal authorities for acting on a tip about which they have become increasingly skeptical. "I've been in America 23 years. I would never let anybody harm here in America," said Maged M. Hussein, a U.S. citizen from Egypt. Hussein spoke from behind the counter of Koko Market shortly after being released from Baltimore Central Booking and Intake Center, where he had been held on a gun charge unrelated to terrorism.
NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN and MATTHEW DOLAN,SUN REPORTER | October 20, 2005
Law enforcement officials and members of the local Egyptian community are raising new questions about an informant who prompted Maryland officials to close two Baltimore harbor tunnels and a major interstate, fearing a suspected terrorist attack. A day after the tunnel closures, the FBI has been unable to corroborate the account of the informant - an Egyptian who once lived in the Baltimore area and is now being held in the Netherlands on immigration violations. No criminal charges have been filed in the alleged plot to blow up one of Baltimore's harbor tunnels, the FBI confirmed yesterday.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Jessica Valdez and Heather Dewar and Jessica Valdez,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2003
A 6-year-old boy was shot and maimed yesterday after he and his little brother found a loaded gun in the living room of the Baltimore house where they were staying, in the 2100 block of Koko Lane. The 6-year-old, whose name was being withheld by police, was listed in good condition at Johns Hopkins Hospital yesterday, but Baltimore Chief of Detectives Edwin Day said a bullet tore off three fingers on the boy's left hand, and doctors could not reattach the fingers because they were too badly mangled by the blast.
BUSINESS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2000
Straw-bale construction has been around for centuries and was widely used in Ireland, Scotland and other parts of Europe. It was also extensively used in the United States as settlers pushed their way to California, said Bob Armstrong, a plant geneticist who led the now-defunct Alternative Agricultural Research and Commercialization Corporation, a federally funded venture capital group that invested in alternative technologies. "It's a very old technology that folks used when we were settling the West," Armstrong said.
NEWS
March 1, 2000
"In 'Tall Tale: The Unbelievable Adventures of Pecos Bill,' Daniel lived in Paradise Valley. He hated living there and wished he could be anyplace else. The part I liked was when he was chasing a nice-looking horse, but it really was a car." -- LaByanca Harvey Grove Park Elementary " 'Koko's Kitten' is a good book because the author Francine Patterson talks about a real gorilla. Koko knows how to communicate in American Sign Language. The photographs are great." -- Michael Dimick Seneca Elementary "I read a book called 'Amber Brown Goes Fourth' by Paula Danziger.
NEWS
By JOSH MITCHELL and JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTER | October 21, 2005
Speaking for the first time since he was swept up in a terror probe, the owner of a Southeast Baltimore convenience store said yesterday he knows of no plots to blow up a Baltimore tunnel, and he criticized federal authorities for acting on a tip about which they have become increasingly skeptical. "I've been in America 23 years. I would never let anybody harm here in America," said Maged M. Hussein, a U.S. citizen from Egypt. Hussein spoke from behind the counter of Koko Market shortly after being released from Baltimore Central Booking and Intake Center, where he had been held on a gun charge unrelated to terrorism.
NEWS
November 19, 2007
Patrols at Towson U. ramp up amid threat University police are stepping up campus police patrols this week after an anonymous threat indicated something would happen today at Linthicum Hall, a spokeswoman said yesterday. Police are investigating the threat, received Friday, involving the liberal arts classroom building near the center of campus, said Carol Vellucci, assistant for communications to University President Robert L. Caret. Although the threat "did not seem to have a high level of credibility," Vellucci said, officials sent an e-mail and text message to students and posted a notice on the university Web site.
FEATURES
August 26, 1998
"I like 'Koko's Kitten' by Francine Patterson. She taught a female baby gorilla American Sign Language. American Sign Language is used by deaf people in order to talk with their hands. When Dr. Patterson ask Koko what she wanted on her 12th birthday, Koko signed 'cat.' "- Lanika HinesSeneca Elementary"If you like books about angels, you will like 'The High Rise Glorious Skittle Skat Roarious Sky Pie Angel Food Cake' by Nancy Willard. It is about a girl who tries to make a cake for her mother with her great-grandmother's recipe.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson and Jill Hudson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Dan Morse contributed to this article | August 27, 1997
The major motion picture being filmed right here in Howard County -- who knew? -- will take to the streets of Columbia tomorrow night as the movie's crew makes a rare public appearance, apparently to shoot a car chase.The producers of "Species 2" -- a sequel to the 1995 science-fiction horror movie "Species" -- have accomplished the seemingly impossible by getting a large billboard erected on the otherwise sign-free streets of Columbia.But for the most part, their work has attracted little notice beyond the businesses that have benefited from the money they are leaving behind.
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