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Kofi Annan

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NEWS
By Tom Teepen | February 24, 1998
THE agreement Kofi Annan has brought out of Baghdad must of course be opened in strong sunlight and looked at closely. If it is as the U.N. secretary general has billed it, a horrendous and widely unpopular American aerial war against Iraq will have been mercifully avoided at least for now.Whether it will have been avoided in the long run will still be very much undecided. Saddam Hussein walks a path littered with broken promises, cast-off treaties and the detritus of double-dealing.Let's take a lookIt should be possible to test Mr. Saddam quickly.
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SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | August 20, 2004
I signed just below Nelson Mandela. The International Olympic Truce Centre is asking visitors to the Summer Games to put their names on an M-tOlympic Truce,M-v a modern extension of the peace proclamation of 776 B.C. that allowed the Games to be played in Olympia. M-tWe donM-Ft expect to change the world,M-v said volunteer Areti Parnassa, at the display. M-tItM-Fs a window of opportunity. If we can just open the window a little, itM-Fs a start.M-v Organizers started gathering signatures in 2002 and hope to add thousands, maybe millions, to the panels that will be erected at the next three Olympics.
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NEWS
January 27, 1997
UNITED NATIONS Secretary General Kofi Annan's visit to Washington marks an improvement in relations between the United States and the world organization. Mr. Annan's predecessor, Boutros Boutros-Ghali of Egypt, clashed often with the U.S. over Somalia, Bosnia, Rwanda and the issue of U.N. reform.But Mr. Annan owes his selection as secretary general (the first sub-Saharan African to achieve this post) to the Clinton administration's support. At meetings with President Clinton, State Department officials and Republicans on Capitol Hill, the Ghanaian diplomat repeatedly stated his commitment to reform.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 3, 2003
WASHINGTON - The United States is preparing for the possible deployment of hundreds of troops to Liberia to lead a multinational force to maintain a fragile cease-fire, allow for the return of relief groups and help pave the way for a stable government in the strife-torn West African nation, Bush administration officials said. A senior State Department official said no final decision has been made because President Bush wants a number of conditions met before he dispatches an American military force.
NEWS
December 15, 1996
AFTER A HALF-CENTURY, the United Nations will begin the new year with its seventh secretary-general. Kofi Annan of Ghana, 58, will be the most experience-qualified of the lot, having spent three decades as an international civil servant. And he will be the first black African.Now the under-secretary-general for peace-keeping, Mr. Annan enjoys a high reputation around the U.N. for competence and tact. That may not please the likes of Sen. Jesse Helms, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, the sort of critic to be assuaged if the U.S. is to pay its $1.4 billion arrears to rescue the U.N. from bankruptcy.
NEWS
October 14, 2001
THE 2001 Nobel Peace Prize to both the United Nations and Secretary-General Kofi Annan is a vindication of that body, but also of its critics. It rewards Sen. Jesse Helms and the Reagan and Clinton administrations, which forced reforms on the U.N. and dumped former Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali for Kofi Annan. This prize says the reforms worked. It honors Mr. Annan for whipping up world concern about AIDS and for holding the chaotic U.N. Conference on Racism, but also for making the U.N. the center of a global coalition against terrorism.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | August 20, 2004
I signed just below Nelson Mandela. The International Olympic Truce Centre is asking visitors to the Summer Games to put their names on an M-tOlympic Truce,M-v a modern extension of the peace proclamation of 776 B.C. that allowed the Games to be played in Olympia. M-tWe donM-Ft expect to change the world,M-v said volunteer Areti Parnassa, at the display. M-tItM-Fs a window of opportunity. If we can just open the window a little, itM-Fs a start.M-v Organizers started gathering signatures in 2002 and hope to add thousands, maybe millions, to the panels that will be erected at the next three Olympics.
NEWS
By Daniel Berger | May 21, 1998
KOFI Annan had expected Rwanda to be tough. In the event of his visit, "it was moving, almost harrowing."He had had to take the rap, serve the scapegoat function of U.N. secretary-general, facing the politicians and people of that wounded country.Just before his recent whirlwind tour of nine Central African countries in 12 days, Mr. Annan was fingered by the New Yorker magazine as the one solely responsible for the world's failure to prevent the genocide of Tutsis in Rwanda in 1994. And there he was, not two weeks ago, facing hostile Tutsi survivors.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 22, 1998
UNITED NATIONS -- Military attacks to punish Baghdad for its refusal to grant U.N. inspectors access to suspected weapons sites would jeopardize the intricate web of monitoring and humanitarian operations the United Nations has built across Iraq with Washington's encouragement, some U.N. officials and diplomats say.The inspections for proscribed weapons of mass destruction rely on 24-hour electronic monitoring.Those could be put at risk, the officials say, as would physical searches of suspect facilities.
NEWS
April 3, 2001
U.N. rights chief reverses decision, wants to stay on UNITED NATIONS - Mary Robinson has reversed her decision to step down as U.N. human rights chief and asked for a one-year extension of her term, the United Nations said yesterday. Two weeks ago, Robinson said she would leave her post in September, at the end of her four-year term. She said she thought she could do more outside the constraints of the U.N. system. But U.N. officials said that after expressions of regret at her departure from many quarters, she asked for a one-year extension.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 22, 2002
WASHINGTON - After a pivotal week, American preparations for a war to topple the Iraqi regime of Saddam Hussein are gaining momentum, with President Bush likely to win crucial support from Congress for military action but with foreign backing far from certain. With its top national security officials presenting a united front, the administration is aggressively pressing its case for military action on Capitol Hill, where support appears to be growing to grant the president broad authority for an invasion of Iraq if and when he chooses.
NEWS
October 14, 2001
THE 2001 Nobel Peace Prize to both the United Nations and Secretary-General Kofi Annan is a vindication of that body, but also of its critics. It rewards Sen. Jesse Helms and the Reagan and Clinton administrations, which forced reforms on the U.N. and dumped former Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali for Kofi Annan. This prize says the reforms worked. It honors Mr. Annan for whipping up world concern about AIDS and for holding the chaotic U.N. Conference on Racism, but also for making the U.N. the center of a global coalition against terrorism.
NEWS
April 3, 2001
U.N. rights chief reverses decision, wants to stay on UNITED NATIONS - Mary Robinson has reversed her decision to step down as U.N. human rights chief and asked for a one-year extension of her term, the United Nations said yesterday. Two weeks ago, Robinson said she would leave her post in September, at the end of her four-year term. She said she thought she could do more outside the constraints of the U.N. system. But U.N. officials said that after expressions of regret at her departure from many quarters, she asked for a one-year extension.
NEWS
By Daniel Berger | May 21, 1998
KOFI Annan had expected Rwanda to be tough. In the event of his visit, "it was moving, almost harrowing."He had had to take the rap, serve the scapegoat function of U.N. secretary-general, facing the politicians and people of that wounded country.Just before his recent whirlwind tour of nine Central African countries in 12 days, Mr. Annan was fingered by the New Yorker magazine as the one solely responsible for the world's failure to prevent the genocide of Tutsis in Rwanda in 1994. And there he was, not two weeks ago, facing hostile Tutsi survivors.
NEWS
By PHYLLIS BENNIS | March 22, 1998
Kofi Annan gets a lot of press for being polite to Washington policymakers. The reality is that the United Nations secretary-general is a far tougher diplomat and significantly more accountable to the developing countries of the Third World, than he gets credit for.Even when Annan is forced to give in to U.S. pressure, he demands - and gets - something in return. In Geneva last week, Annan for the first time cited the U.S. version, rather than the official U.N. language, of what Iraq must do to end the economic sanctions.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | March 2, 1998
LONDON -- On too many occasions, the United Nations has been the big man's whipping boy. President Clinton for one has kicked it harder than his two immediate Republican predecessors ever did. Nikita Khrushchev banged his shoe at it and Charles de Gaulle called it "ce machin." Yet once again we see how in a crisis the big powers run to it to get themselves off the hook, this time for a bombing no one really had the argument or stomach for.Back in 1954, there was the charged incident over the capture of 17 U.S. airmen by China.
NEWS
By PHYLLIS BENNIS | March 22, 1998
Kofi Annan gets a lot of press for being polite to Washington policymakers. The reality is that the United Nations secretary-general is a far tougher diplomat and significantly more accountable to the developing countries of the Third World, than he gets credit for.Even when Annan is forced to give in to U.S. pressure, he demands - and gets - something in return. In Geneva last week, Annan for the first time cited the U.S. version, rather than the official U.N. language, of what Iraq must do to end the economic sanctions.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 3, 2003
WASHINGTON - The United States is preparing for the possible deployment of hundreds of troops to Liberia to lead a multinational force to maintain a fragile cease-fire, allow for the return of relief groups and help pave the way for a stable government in the strife-torn West African nation, Bush administration officials said. A senior State Department official said no final decision has been made because President Bush wants a number of conditions met before he dispatches an American military force.
NEWS
By Tom Teepen | February 24, 1998
THE agreement Kofi Annan has brought out of Baghdad must of course be opened in strong sunlight and looked at closely. If it is as the U.N. secretary general has billed it, a horrendous and widely unpopular American aerial war against Iraq will have been mercifully avoided at least for now.Whether it will have been avoided in the long run will still be very much undecided. Saddam Hussein walks a path littered with broken promises, cast-off treaties and the detritus of double-dealing.Let's take a lookIt should be possible to test Mr. Saddam quickly.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 22, 1998
UNITED NATIONS -- Military attacks to punish Baghdad for its refusal to grant U.N. inspectors access to suspected weapons sites would jeopardize the intricate web of monitoring and humanitarian operations the United Nations has built across Iraq with Washington's encouragement, some U.N. officials and diplomats say.The inspections for proscribed weapons of mass destruction rely on 24-hour electronic monitoring.Those could be put at risk, the officials say, as would physical searches of suspect facilities.
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