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NEWS
December 15, 2009
Phil Kerpen and Dave Schwartz ("Skepticism in Copenhagen," Dec. 10) say that measures to combat climate change are going to be too costly and are aimed at a risk that has not been proven a certainty. But before buying into their argument, consider that the organization they represent, Americans for Prosperity, is chaired by David H. Koch, of Koch Industries - which runs oil refining and pipeline industries. For years now, those associated with the petroleum industry have been fighting tooth and nail against climate change science, relentlessly sowing doubt in the minds of the public.
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NEWS
February 20, 2014
Commentator Peter Morici is both right and very wrong ( "Obama's policies divide the nation," Feb. 17). He's right about the need for U.S. jobs, about falling inflation-adjusted wages, about growing income inequality that undermines our core values and discourages job seekers. He's right that government policy should be changed to address these issues. He's wrong on - well, where to begin? He's wrong that gender bias, on balance, favors women and not men in government policies and the workplace.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
Ten protesters gathered Tuesday morning in front of The Baltimore Sun's office on North Calvert Street, rallying against a possible sale of the newspaper to Koch Industries. Headed by brothers David H. Koch and Charles G. Koch, the private company has emerged as a potential buyer in Tribune Co.'s possible sale of its newspapers, according to a New York Times report last month. The Kochs are known for their support of conservative and libertarian advocacy. Similar protests have occurred outside other newspapers owned by Tribune, including the Los Angeles Times and the Chicago Tribune.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | July 17, 2013
A basic economic principle is that government ought to tax what we want to discourage, and not tax what we want to encourage. For example, if we want less carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, we should tax carbon polluters. On the other hand, if we want more students from lower-income families to be able to afford college, we should not put a tax on student loans. Sounds pretty simple, doesn't it? Unfortunately, congressional Republicans seem intent on doing exactly the opposite. Earlier this year, the Republican-led House passed a bill pegging student-loan interest rates to the yield on the 10-year Treasury note, plus 2.5 percentage points.
NEWS
February 20, 2014
Commentator Peter Morici is both right and very wrong ( "Obama's policies divide the nation," Feb. 17). He's right about the need for U.S. jobs, about falling inflation-adjusted wages, about growing income inequality that undermines our core values and discourages job seekers. He's right that government policy should be changed to address these issues. He's wrong on - well, where to begin? He's wrong that gender bias, on balance, favors women and not men in government policies and the workplace.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 24, 1993
HOLLYWOOD -- William I. Koch, the chairman of a major supercomputing company and one of the richest men in the United States, has asked the head of a large Hollywood talent agency to explore making a bid for ailing Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc., according to film industry sources.In a letter dated Sept. 16, Mr. Koch authorized Jeff Berg, chairman of International Creative Management, "to solicit information about Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer on behalf of Oxbow Corporation so that Oxbow can evaluate the feasibility of the purchase of all or part of MGM."
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | June 29, 1992
Turning the corner into the second half of 1992, we print today some notes, quotes and other items relating to your workplace and your pocketbook:MIDSUMMER MEMOS: The top one percent of U.S. earners are, in order, corporate executives, business owners, attorneys, doctors, dentists and "others" (sports stars, actors, consultants, etc.), according to the Treasury Department's Office of Tax Analysis . . . A Camp Hill, Pa., reader sends her 1992 "Charitable Request Chart," showing rising number of charity appeals she received this year: January (16)
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | July 17, 2013
A basic economic principle is that government ought to tax what we want to discourage, and not tax what we want to encourage. For example, if we want less carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, we should tax carbon polluters. On the other hand, if we want more students from lower-income families to be able to afford college, we should not put a tax on student loans. Sounds pretty simple, doesn't it? Unfortunately, congressional Republicans seem intent on doing exactly the opposite. Earlier this year, the Republican-led House passed a bill pegging student-loan interest rates to the yield on the 10-year Treasury note, plus 2.5 percentage points.
BUSINESS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1999
EASTON -- A little-known firm using cutting-edge geographic-imaging techniques is promising to transform the staid capital of the Colonial Eastern Shore into a high-tech employment center.Pioneering technology that has far-reaching implications for precision farming, environmental monitoring, land-use cartography and a host of other practical applications, 3DI LLC has caught the attention of National Aeronautics and Space Administration officials.Led by 3DI Chairman Monty L. Deel, a regional consortium that includes local governments, colleges and economic development officials is awaiting approval of a $280,000 state grant to establish one of the space agency's regional application centers at Easton Airport.
NEWS
December 15, 2009
We need the public option For The Sun to say that we should ditch the public option to avoid an "ugly debate" is to give veto power to those willing to turn the debate ugly, by whom I mean the ranting and raving right-wingers with their shameless nonsense about death panels and National Socialism ("Wise compromise," Dec. 10). Talk about rewarding bad behavior. The public option may be, as you say, a "means to an end," but it's not just any means toward the ends of competition and cost control - it's by far the best means, according to the Congressional Budget Office and other objective observers.
BUSINESS
By Robert Channick and Jamie Smith Hopkins, Tribune Newspapers | July 10, 2013
The Baltimore Sun's owner said Wednesday that it plans to spin off its newspapers as a separate company, the latest move in the Tribune Co.'s effort to focus on the more profitable broadcasting industry. Chicago-based Tribune said its publishing assets, which include the Chicago Tribune, Los Angeles Times and six other daily newspapers, would be split off with its own board and senior management while the rest of Tribune's holdings — including its television stations and real estate — would stay with the original company.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
Ten protesters gathered Tuesday morning in front of The Baltimore Sun's office on North Calvert Street, rallying against a possible sale of the newspaper to Koch Industries. Headed by brothers David H. Koch and Charles G. Koch, the private company has emerged as a potential buyer in Tribune Co.'s possible sale of its newspapers, according to a New York Times report last month. The Kochs are known for their support of conservative and libertarian advocacy. Similar protests have occurred outside other newspapers owned by Tribune, including the Los Angeles Times and the Chicago Tribune.
NEWS
December 15, 2009
We need the public option For The Sun to say that we should ditch the public option to avoid an "ugly debate" is to give veto power to those willing to turn the debate ugly, by whom I mean the ranting and raving right-wingers with their shameless nonsense about death panels and National Socialism ("Wise compromise," Dec. 10). Talk about rewarding bad behavior. The public option may be, as you say, a "means to an end," but it's not just any means toward the ends of competition and cost control - it's by far the best means, according to the Congressional Budget Office and other objective observers.
NEWS
December 15, 2009
Phil Kerpen and Dave Schwartz ("Skepticism in Copenhagen," Dec. 10) say that measures to combat climate change are going to be too costly and are aimed at a risk that has not been proven a certainty. But before buying into their argument, consider that the organization they represent, Americans for Prosperity, is chaired by David H. Koch, of Koch Industries - which runs oil refining and pipeline industries. For years now, those associated with the petroleum industry have been fighting tooth and nail against climate change science, relentlessly sowing doubt in the minds of the public.
BUSINESS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1999
EASTON -- A little-known firm using cutting-edge geographic-imaging techniques is promising to transform the staid capital of the Colonial Eastern Shore into a high-tech employment center.Pioneering technology that has far-reaching implications for precision farming, environmental monitoring, land-use cartography and a host of other practical applications, 3DI LLC has caught the attention of National Aeronautics and Space Administration officials.Led by 3DI Chairman Monty L. Deel, a regional consortium that includes local governments, colleges and economic development officials is awaiting approval of a $280,000 state grant to establish one of the space agency's regional application centers at Easton Airport.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 24, 1993
HOLLYWOOD -- William I. Koch, the chairman of a major supercomputing company and one of the richest men in the United States, has asked the head of a large Hollywood talent agency to explore making a bid for ailing Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc., according to film industry sources.In a letter dated Sept. 16, Mr. Koch authorized Jeff Berg, chairman of International Creative Management, "to solicit information about Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer on behalf of Oxbow Corporation so that Oxbow can evaluate the feasibility of the purchase of all or part of MGM."
BUSINESS
By Robert Channick and Jamie Smith Hopkins, Tribune Newspapers | July 10, 2013
The Baltimore Sun's owner said Wednesday that it plans to spin off its newspapers as a separate company, the latest move in the Tribune Co.'s effort to focus on the more profitable broadcasting industry. Chicago-based Tribune said its publishing assets, which include the Chicago Tribune, Los Angeles Times and six other daily newspapers, would be split off with its own board and senior management while the rest of Tribune's holdings — including its television stations and real estate — would stay with the original company.
NEWS
December 1, 2006
A New York-based business executive is donating $20 million to support a new cancer research building on the Johns Hopkins University's East Baltimore medical campus. The building will be named the David H. Koch Cancer Research Building, in honor of the donor, at ceremonies Monday. The 267,000-square-foot building on Orleans Street opened in March with 10 stories of office space and five floors of labs for cancer investigators focused on various types of cancer. An connects the building with its twin, the Bunting Blaustein Cancer Research Building.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | June 29, 1992
Turning the corner into the second half of 1992, we print today some notes, quotes and other items relating to your workplace and your pocketbook:MIDSUMMER MEMOS: The top one percent of U.S. earners are, in order, corporate executives, business owners, attorneys, doctors, dentists and "others" (sports stars, actors, consultants, etc.), according to the Treasury Department's Office of Tax Analysis . . . A Camp Hill, Pa., reader sends her 1992 "Charitable Request Chart," showing rising number of charity appeals she received this year: January (16)
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