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NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | June 18, 1998
Fed up with months of delays, Baltimore leaders pulled out of a contract yesterday to build two police kobans promised to be operating by last November in two neighborhoods.Residents of Fells Point and near Penn Station, who have lobbied and trumpeted the koban -- or mini-police station -- as an essential crime-fighting tool, will have to wait until the city can complete another bid process.That could take months."Good grief!" said Holly Wilson, a Fells Point resident, who was eagerly awaiting the koban in Broadway Square.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | June 11, 2004
YOU STAND on the sidewalk and remember another time. The school bells ring, and you watch the kids spill out of the building with teachers in the doorway calling after them to slow down. It's too late. They're already racing madly past you, across the broad streets beyond, and they scatter and disappear. You remember summers past, when the grown-ups handed children the world. The summer vacations lasted a thousand years and still ended too soon. You remember those days, carefree beyond imagining, and now the memory becomes a cloud over the summer that arrives.
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NEWS
April 18, 1995
A crane has finally delivered the long-awaited "koban" to the corner of West Lexington and North Howard streets, a block east of Lexington Market.In a few weeks, that Japanese-inspired 8-by-12-foot blue box will be activated as a new police substation. If the concept works, similar substations may crop up in such places as the Inner Harbor and Fells Point.It is instructive to consider how the city police ended up erecting this free-standing box in the middle of the pedestrian Lexington Mall.
NEWS
By From staff reports | December 14, 1998
Police investigating the fatal shooting of an unidentified man on an East Baltimore street yesterday afternoon said they knew of no motive and have no suspects in custody.Detective Mark Hughes said officers responding to a report of a shooting in the 1800 block of N. Port St. about 4: 10 p.m. found the man, believed to be in his late 20s, lying in the street and bleeding from at least one bullet wound.Hughes said the man was rushed by ambulance to Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he died shortly after arrival.
NEWS
By From staff reports | December 14, 1998
Police investigating the fatal shooting of an unidentified man on an East Baltimore street yesterday afternoon said they knew of no motive and have no suspects in custody.Detective Mark Hughes said officers responding to a report of a shooting in the 1800 block of N. Port St. about 4: 10 p.m. found the man, believed to be in his late 20s, lying in the street and bleeding from at least one bullet wound.Hughes said the man was rushed by ambulance to Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he died shortly after arrival.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Sun Staff Writer | April 11, 1995
Construction workers lowered Baltimore's newest style of community policing into place yesterday at Market Center: an 8-by-12-foot corner kiosk based on a Japanese model of law enforcement.In a few weeks, this blue box at the northwest corner of West Lexington and North Howard streets will be a new police substation known as a "koban," complete with phones, a fax, a computer, television monitors and a bathroom.Now, it is an empty steel shell with bulletproof glass, but the $125,000 structure is being lauded by police and business leaders as a step toward revitalizing the Howard Street corridor.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,Sun Staff Writer | June 7, 1995
Baltimore's newest effort in community policing, a Japanese-inspired corner kiosk that opened last week, is being lauded by merchants and shoppers at Lexington Market as a step toward revitalizing the Howard Street corridor.Known as a "koban," the police substation is an air-conditioned, 8-by-12-foot blue box at the northwest corner of West Lexington and North Howard streets. The shiny new $125,000 steel structure sits among buildings that have been boarded up and scarred by graffiti.Equipped with a telephone, bullet-proof glass and a small bathroom, the koban opened for business June 1. Officers assigned to the substation are not supposed to leave the kiosk, which is staffed from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Emergency calls must still go through 911. The main purpose of the koban, police officials said, is visibility.
NEWS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1997
Despite the concerns of civil libertarians, city officials said yesterday they will expand electronic surveillance of Baltimore streets by placing 11 cameras in the area around Penn Station.City police will use the cameras to watch a 16-block area -- bounded by North, Mount Royal, Guilford and Maryland avenues -- to ease the safety concerns of travelers using the station, a gateway to the city used by more than 1 million people a year.Police say the first such cameras in the city, installed last year in the Howard Street corridor around Lexington Market, are working well.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | June 11, 2004
YOU STAND on the sidewalk and remember another time. The school bells ring, and you watch the kids spill out of the building with teachers in the doorway calling after them to slow down. It's too late. They're already racing madly past you, across the broad streets beyond, and they scatter and disappear. You remember summers past, when the grown-ups handed children the world. The summer vacations lasted a thousand years and still ended too soon. You remember those days, carefree beyond imagining, and now the memory becomes a cloud over the summer that arrives.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Sun Staff Writer | July 7, 1995
Charging that major crimes in Baltimore have increased by 41 percent during Kurt L. Schmoke's eight years as mayor, City Council President Mary Pat Clarke pledged yesterday to boost the city's police force by about 300 and aggressively pursue community policing if elected.Mrs. Clarke, who is challenging Mr. Schmoke in the Sept. 12 Democratic primary, held the second in a series of three %J announcements to detail her campaign's anti-crime platform. Last week, she stood at a street corner in Reservoir Hill known for drug dealing to declare a "zero tolerance" approach to drug use.Near a snowball stand in the 1700 block of Castle St. in East Baltimore yesterday, Mrs. Clarke criticized the city's attempts at community policing, instituted under the Schmoke administration, as nothing more than "promises" because of a citywide shortage of police officers.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | June 18, 1998
Fed up with months of delays, Baltimore leaders pulled out of a contract yesterday to build two police kobans promised to be operating by last November in two neighborhoods.Residents of Fells Point and near Penn Station, who have lobbied and trumpeted the koban -- or mini-police station -- as an essential crime-fighting tool, will have to wait until the city can complete another bid process.That could take months."Good grief!" said Holly Wilson, a Fells Point resident, who was eagerly awaiting the koban in Broadway Square.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1997
A map in Monday's editions indicated that a pedestrian bridge spanning Lombard Street just west of Charles Street will be torn down as part of the Hopkins Plaza renovations. The bridge will not be taken down.The Sun regrets the errorThe city of Baltimore has begun a $4 million renovation of Hopkins Plaza by demolishing sections of the little-used pedestrian skywalk system that runs through the area.Contractors have torn down much of a concrete stairway near the entrance to the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre.
NEWS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1997
Despite the concerns of civil libertarians, city officials said yesterday they will expand electronic surveillance of Baltimore streets by placing 11 cameras in the area around Penn Station.City police will use the cameras to watch a 16-block area -- bounded by North, Mount Royal, Guilford and Maryland avenues -- to ease the safety concerns of travelers using the station, a gateway to the city used by more than 1 million people a year.Police say the first such cameras in the city, installed last year in the Howard Street corridor around Lexington Market, are working well.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Sun Staff Writer | July 7, 1995
Charging that major crimes in Baltimore have increased by 41 percent during Kurt L. Schmoke's eight years as mayor, City Council President Mary Pat Clarke pledged yesterday to boost the city's police force by about 300 and aggressively pursue community policing if elected.Mrs. Clarke, who is challenging Mr. Schmoke in the Sept. 12 Democratic primary, held the second in a series of three %J announcements to detail her campaign's anti-crime platform. Last week, she stood at a street corner in Reservoir Hill known for drug dealing to declare a "zero tolerance" approach to drug use.Near a snowball stand in the 1700 block of Castle St. in East Baltimore yesterday, Mrs. Clarke criticized the city's attempts at community policing, instituted under the Schmoke administration, as nothing more than "promises" because of a citywide shortage of police officers.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,Sun Staff Writer | June 7, 1995
Baltimore's newest effort in community policing, a Japanese-inspired corner kiosk that opened last week, is being lauded by merchants and shoppers at Lexington Market as a step toward revitalizing the Howard Street corridor.Known as a "koban," the police substation is an air-conditioned, 8-by-12-foot blue box at the northwest corner of West Lexington and North Howard streets. The shiny new $125,000 steel structure sits among buildings that have been boarded up and scarred by graffiti.Equipped with a telephone, bullet-proof glass and a small bathroom, the koban opened for business June 1. Officers assigned to the substation are not supposed to leave the kiosk, which is staffed from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Emergency calls must still go through 911. The main purpose of the koban, police officials said, is visibility.
NEWS
April 21, 1995
Likes Police KioskThis is to publicly congratulate Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier on the installation of the first "koban" (kiosk) police station at Market Center. This is a great way to bring the police to the people.The Inner Harbor, Lexington Market and Mondawmin are all candidates for kobans.The commissioner is doing more policing by being visible rather than just increasing the number of police. Common sense tells us that the kobans will be another effective tool in preventing crime and giving confidence to law-abiding citizens.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1997
A map in Monday's editions indicated that a pedestrian bridge spanning Lombard Street just west of Charles Street will be torn down as part of the Hopkins Plaza renovations. The bridge will not be taken down.The Sun regrets the errorThe city of Baltimore has begun a $4 million renovation of Hopkins Plaza by demolishing sections of the little-used pedestrian skywalk system that runs through the area.Contractors have torn down much of a concrete stairway near the entrance to the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre.
NEWS
April 18, 1995
A crane has finally delivered the long-awaited "koban" to the corner of West Lexington and North Howard streets, a block east of Lexington Market.In a few weeks, that Japanese-inspired 8-by-12-foot blue box will be activated as a new police substation. If the concept works, similar substations may crop up in such places as the Inner Harbor and Fells Point.It is instructive to consider how the city police ended up erecting this free-standing box in the middle of the pedestrian Lexington Mall.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Sun Staff Writer | April 11, 1995
Construction workers lowered Baltimore's newest style of community policing into place yesterday at Market Center: an 8-by-12-foot corner kiosk based on a Japanese model of law enforcement.In a few weeks, this blue box at the northwest corner of West Lexington and North Howard streets will be a new police substation known as a "koban," complete with phones, a fax, a computer, television monitors and a bathroom.Now, it is an empty steel shell with bulletproof glass, but the $125,000 structure is being lauded by police and business leaders as a step toward revitalizing the Howard Street corridor.
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