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By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2011
A keen knowledge of geography and some good fortune helped Neel Lakhanpal take first place Friday at the Maryland leg of the 23rd annual National Geographic Bee. "Some questions were hard, and I had to think a lot," said the 13-year-old seventh-grade student at Severn School in Severna Park. "It takes a little bit of luck. Some of the questions that others got I would not have known the answer. " Economics had a part, too, in the final question. Neither Neel nor Adam Rusak, a seventh-grader at Lakelands Park Middle School in Gaithersburg, had missed a single question as they entered the championship round.
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Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
1. In the episode "Lucy Has Her Eyes Examined?" (it will be re-created in the "I Love Lucy Live on Stage" production at the Hippodrome ), Lucy gets a dance lesson from: a)Van Johnson b)William Parker c)The Crazy Dancin' Bear d)"King Cat" Walsh 2. When Lucy tests Ricky's fidelity in "The Black Wig" episode, she and Ethel disguise themselves for a date with the guys at an Italian restaurant. How does Lucy describe the outfit hastily supplied by costumer "Mother Carol" for Ethel: a)
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NEWS
By Linda Seebach | March 12, 1997
PLEASANTON, Calif. -- A friend of mine who frequents used bookstores came home not long ago with a charming volume from an earlier day. ''Sea-side and Way-side, No. 4'' by Julia McNair Wright is a child's nature reader, a collection of scientific tales about the wonders of the natural world ornamented with uplifting verses and personal reminiscences.The copyright date is 1892, and a lot of the science Mrs. Wright describes with such contagious joy has been superseded. There's nothing about quantum mechanics or nuclear physics, plate tectonics or DNA, and the solar system has eight known planets.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Everyone has a remedy to beat the summer heat, from a trip to the pool to a snowball from a shack. At Midnight Sun, we prefer the tried, true and futile practice of complaining about unrelenting humidity over cold drinks at a comfortable bar. It accomplishes little besides a buzz, and that's just fine. On a recent Friday evening, Le Garage Beer Bar & Frites - which opened in May on Hampden's West 36th Street, better known as the Avenue - offered a low-key backdrop for such sweat-induced grumbling.
NEWS
January 8, 2006
Last week, pupils at West minster Elementary School competed in preliminary rounds of the National Geography Bee. The school competition, whose final round is this week and will include both fourth- and fifth-graders, tests pupils' knowledge of the world. The overall winner will try to qualify for the national championship.
NEWS
December 2, 1999
THE ANNE Arundel County school system cannot surrender to the impulse to build better test-takers. It must build better-prepared students.The temptation is there to "teach to the test." The composite score on the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program test dipped two points this year in Anne Arundel.In the county, 46.5 percent of third, fifth and eighth-graders met satisfactory standards. That's much better than six years ago, but not as good as the statewide increase over that span.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Staff Writer | December 2, 1993
Imagine combining the knowledge and experience of a company's best workers within a computer system, standardizing everyone's work habits and increasing the efficiency of all employees.That's just what 9-year-old Annapolis-based Oxko Corp. does for clients in commercial industry and government."What we're doing here, some people don't believe in it," said Steven W. Oxman, the company's president. "They think it's magic."But an "expert system" his company designed three years ago for Elkem Metals Co.'s plant in Alloy, W.Va.
SPORTS
By Blackie Sherrod and Blackie Sherrod,Dallas Morning News | September 8, 1991
No mortal soul ever accused Mr. Jack Sherrill of being unknowledgeable. Plus, there are indications Jackie's knowledge extends beyond his unquestioned ability to organize a winning college football program.One recollection is a dinner conversation turning toward a recent airliner crash. The cause had been listed as "wind shear.""That's a new one on me," said ole buster here."New? Certainly it's not new!" Sherrill said, just a bit scornfully. The coach was a licensed pilot who did much of his own flying on Texas A&M recruiting trips.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 29, 1991
UNITED NATIONS -- United Nations inspectors and U.S. intelligence agencies got clear indications that Iraq was trying to hide the plans behind its ambitious nuclear weapons program when inspectors discovered that Iraqi nuclear sites suspiciously lacked paper records and that the scientists there had a high level of theoretical knowledge about bomb-making.The discoveries led to the raids last week on two document-storage centers by special inspection teams that included U.S. and British scientists with practical experience of designing nuclear weapons.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | March 22, 1998
Now comes a profoundly learned and widely honored man, demanding that humankind regroup all knowledge and reroute all learning. The shock: He is stark sane. The man is Edward O. Wilson. His demand is summed up in a wonderful new book, "Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge" (Knopf, 352 pages, $26).You should know who he is. An Alabaman, now 69, Wilson has been teaching for 43 years at Harvard, where he got his Ph.D. in biology. Two of his six previous books won Pulitzer Prizes: "On Human Nature," and "The Ants."
NEWS
By Marin Langlieb | August 1, 2014
To the people at the College Board: Thank you for redesigning the SAT, effective spring 2016. No, seriously. Even though I will be the last class to take the regular SAT, I appreciate your kindness in not making future generations memorize words like "execrable" and "lassitude" and declining to take points off because I'm human and occasionally answer questions wrong. But while I thank you for trying to make it better, the only way to make the SAT perfect is to get rid of it. The SAT is a 225-minute race to the finish line encompassing everything schools have been trying to prepare students for since pre-school.
SPORTS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2014
They came to Power Plant Live! with American flags slung like capes around their necks, red-white-and-blue suspenders holding up their shorts and giant top hats festooned with enormous glittering stars that would make Uncle Sam blush. Fifteen minutes before the United States' World Cup match against Portugal, Bruce Springsteen's "Born in the U.S.A. " filled the downtown air. Ten minutes till the start, and the U.S. soccer chant, "I believe that we will win," reached a roar. A DJ whipped the crowd into bellowing "USA" with a few anxious minutes remaining.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | June 7, 2014
Given the numerous studies revealing how American education lags behind instruction in other countries in disciplines once thought to be essential, it should come as no surprise that on the 70th anniversary of D-Day, a lot of people are clueless about central elements of the Allied invasion of the European continent on June 6, 1944. The American Council of Trustees and Alumni  (ACTA) has released the results of a survey, which finds only slightly more than half (54 percent)
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
Del. Jon Cardin rejected Thursday the endorsement of a Baltimore-based rapper after learning that the man who calls himself Ski Money is facing charges of human trafficking. Cardin, a candidate for attorney general, said he knew nothing of the rapper's charges and criminal record when he posed for a picture with Lawrence S. Christian, 37, at a fundraiser and his campaign briefly publicized the rapper's support. "I recently learned of the charges that are pending against Mr. Christian, a Baltimore based rapper who endorsed me over Twitter," Cardin, a Baltimore County Democrat, said in a statement.
NEWS
March 20, 2014
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NEWS
By Jack Israel | March 3, 2014
On Sept. 12, 2001 senior managers and technical experts crammed into the narrow and stuffy conference room of the National Security Agency's Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) director. Each was trying to make sense of what had just happened the previous morning when two jets slammed into the World Trade Center in New York. The obvious questions were: Who had done this? How could we lift the spirits of the demoralized counterterrorism division? And more importantly, how could we find and track the people responsible for this attack?
NEWS
June 3, 2001
Editor's Note: Today Jerdine Nolen discusses a listing system that reveals knowledge and gives kids a jump-start into learning new subjects. In Dr. Seuss' first book, "And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street," Marco's father tells him, "Keep your eyes open and see what you can see ..." One day, it's apparent that Marco's imagination has gone into overdrive as he ponders an answer to his father's question about what he's seen on their street. He comes up with a very colorful and cumulative list of things he'd like to see, rather than what his eyes actually take in. But that list reveals the depth and range of Marco's knowledge of the world around him. In schools, teachers often begin with a discussion to stimulate the student's knowledge of a subject.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 21, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Attacks by insurgents to disrupt Baghdad's supplies of crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, water and electricity have reached a degree of coordination and sophistication not seen before, Iraqi and American officials say. The new pattern, they say, shows that the insurgents have a deep understanding of the complex network of pipelines, power cables and reservoirs feeding Baghdad, the Iraqi capital. The shadowy insurgency is a fractured movement made up of distinct groups of Sunnis, Shiites and foreign fighters, some aligned and some not. But the shift in the attack patterns strongly suggests that some branch of the insurgency is carrying out a systematic plan to cripple Baghdad's ability to provide basic services for its 6 million citizens and to prevent the fledgling government from operating.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2014
Orioles executive vice president Dan Duquette said Saturday at FanFest that the club offered first baseman Chris Davis a long-term contract extension this winter, but that “it really hasn't progressed.” Davis, who finished third in American League Most Valuable Player voting last season, can't be a free agent until after the 2015 season. Davis said he didn't think there had been any discussions between the Orioles and his agent, Scott Boras, since last season, and joked that he wanted to know more about what Duquette had said.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
It's getting a bit crowded in the Ducketts Lane Elementary School media center. In addition to about two dozen fifth-graders from the school assembled before a projection screen, media specialist Matthew Winner has invited about two dozen cyberspace invaders — a class from Rossville, Ind. — who show up courtesy of Skype. Students in both classrooms can see one another and take turns waving. Ducketts Lane students are accustomed to the interaction — Winner has allowed them to Skype with similar classes from as far away as China.
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