Advertisement
HomeCollectionsKnopf
IN THE NEWS

Knopf

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 7, 2001
NEW YORK - Former President Bill Clinton agreed yesterday to sell the worldwide rights to publish his memoirs to Alfred A. Knopf Inc. for an advance of more than $10 million, an amount believed to be the largest ever for a nonfiction book. The advance exceeds both the $8.5 million paid for a book by Pope John Paul II in 1994 and the $8 million recently paid to Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton for her memoirs, scheduled for publication in 2003. Adjusted for inflation, the pope's advance would be $10.1 million, but people involved in Clinton's deal said his is substantially higher.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 19, 2012
The legendary publisher Alfred A. Knopf was a man who valued excellence. For years he searched for someone to write a biography of his friend Henry Louis Mencken. In his opinion, no biography up to then, including that of William Manchester, was right. The ideal choice would provide an intellectual understanding of Mencken's many facets but also impart an idea of what the man was really like. Above all, it had to be written by a talent fit to bear the Knopf imprint. As the decades passed, Knopf despaired such a biography would ever be written.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Book Editor | July 30, 1991
An article in Tuesday's Today section incorrectly stated th role of the Enoch Pratt Free Library in the publication of the recently unsealed H. L. Mencken papers, "My Life as Author and Editor." Although the papers will be published by Alfred A. Knopf Inc., Mencken's longtime publisher, as stated in the article, the decision to have them published was made not by Knopf but by the library -- as literary executor of the Mencken estate -- following a recommendation by its board of directors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Art Winslow and Art Winslow,Los Angeles Times | April 5, 2009
A Tolerable Anarchy: Rebels, Reactionaries, and the Making of America's Freedom By Jedediah Purdy Alfred A. Knopf / 294 pages / $23.95 Jebediah Purdy's book is loosely about pushing the boundaries of liberty and searching out the common good, in pursuit of what John Adams called "the sensations of freedom," often as revealed in presidential rhetoric. Tracking the speeches of various U.S. presidents, he laments that "the divorce of civic identity from government, which Nixon set in motion, is nearly complete in Bush's speeches," and that in this conceptual shift, government "is the thing that went away and cleared the space now filled by private virtue."
NEWS
By Peter Jensen | September 15, 1991
Jonathan Yardley, the Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post literary critic, was named yesterday as editor of the latest Henry Louis Mencken autobiography: a 1,025-page manuscript that was unsealed last January, 35 years after the writer's death.Mr. Yardley, a Baltimore resident, will edit "My Life as Author and Editor," which will be published by Alfred A. Knopf Inc. next year. He was chosen as editor by the Mencken Committee of the Enoch Pratt Free Library, which houses much of Mencken's work, and by representatives of Knopf and the library administration.
NEWS
August 1, 1991
An article in Tuesday's Today section incorrectly stated the role of the Enoch Pratt Free Library in the publication of the recently unsealed H. L. Mencken papers, "My Life as Author and Editor." Although the papers will be published by Alfred A. Knopf Inc., Mencken's longtime publisher, as stated in the article, the decision to have them published was made not by Knopf but by the library -- as literary executor of the Mencken estate -- following a recommendation by its board of directors.
NEWS
July 9, 2006
72 Hour Hold Bebe Moore Campbell Alfred A. Knopf / 336 pages / $12.95 A loving mother frantically seeks help for her 18-year old daughter's worsening bipolar disorder. "Stark, incisive and often harrowing," Victoria A. Brownworth wrote last year, "72 Hour Hold brings the trauma of mental illness vividly to life."
NEWS
January 19, 2012
The legendary publisher Alfred A. Knopf was a man who valued excellence. For years he searched for someone to write a biography of his friend Henry Louis Mencken. In his opinion, no biography up to then, including that of William Manchester, was right. The ideal choice would provide an intellectual understanding of Mencken's many facets but also impart an idea of what the man was really like. Above all, it had to be written by a talent fit to bear the Knopf imprint. As the decades passed, Knopf despaired such a biography would ever be written.
NEWS
By Carolyn Melago and Carolyn Melago,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 12, 1998
Every morning, Ginny Knopf's first-grade classroom is overtaken by 23 boys and girls on a mission.Writing clumsily with thick black markers on dry-erase boards, reading from colorful ditto sheets, sometimes scratching their heads and scrunching faces in confusion, the students scurry to complete a slew of reading-related exercises before 9:10 a.m.As they finish editing the morning message and defining vocabulary words of the day, Knopf marvels at them from...
FEATURES
By George E. Curry and George E. Curry,Chicago Tribune | November 22, 1992
NEW YORK -- At 28, Donna Tartt has had the kind of extraordinary good fortune that most first novelists can only imagine. Her book, "The Secret History," was auctioned to publisher Alfred A. Knopf last year for $450,000. Paperback rights to the novel brought in $500,000, foreign rights another half-million dollars, and filmmaker Alan J. Pakula optioned her work, while still in manuscript form, for $500,000.Ms. Tartt has quickly become New York's latest publishinphenom and is being mentioned in the same breath as William Faulkner and Eudora Welty, literary giants from her native Mississippi.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,[Special to The Sun] | March 16, 2008
The Amateur Spy By Dan Fesperman Knopf / 372 pages / $24.95 The role of the thriller in modern literature is vastly underrated. Genre fiction routinely gets short shrift in both critical reviews and literary exegeses. But in the post-Sept. 11 world, political thrillers, particularly those focused on espionage and the fluidity of political affiliations and allegiances, tell a story that is dramatically germane to the way we live now. Baltimore novelist and former Sun reporter Dan Fesperman writes top-flight thrillers.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | February 24, 2008
President Lincoln The Duty of a Statesman By William Lee Miller Alfred A. Knopf / 512 pages / $30 Gen. George B. McClellan called him an "idiot," a "well-meaning baboon" and "the original gorilla." Edwin M. Stanton, the attorney general held over from the Buchanan administration, dismissed him as "a low, cunning clown," an "imbecile." Abraham Lincoln fooled them. We now know him through a tableau of heroic images: "Honest Abe," a rail-splitter who studied by firelight; the "Great Debater," locked in combat with Stephen A. Douglas; "Father Abraham," who led the nation through the bloody, fratricidal Civil War; "The Great Emancipator," who freed African-American slaves; and the martyred leader, assassinated on Good Friday, soon after he promised "malice toward none and charity for all."
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | December 2, 2007
The Squandering of America How the Failure of Our Politics Undermines Our Prosperity By Robert Kuttner Alfred A. Knopf / 352 pages / $26.95 Before Jeremiah was a bullfrog, he was a prophet. Walking through the streets with a wooden yoke around his neck, he warned the Jews of Jerusalem that if they did not mend their evil ways, the Babylonians would besiege and burn their city. "You will go to them," God told Jeremiah, "but they will not listen to you." Ordered to "pray no more for his people," the "broken-hearted prophet" died in exile.
NEWS
By Mark Coleman and Mark Coleman,Los Angeles Times | October 21, 2007
Musicophilia Tales of Music and the Brain By Oliver Sacks Alfred A. Knopf / 384 pages / $26 In his 10th book, neurologist and author Oliver Sacks turns his formidable attention to music and the brain. More than ever, his focus and tone are ruminative, though still probing. He doesn't stint on the science: Studies are cited, sources duly footnoted, the work of others encouragingly acknowledged. But the underlying authority of Musicophilia lies in the warmth and easy command of the author's voice.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,[Special to The Sun] | September 16, 2007
Other Colors Essays and a Story By Orhan Pamuk Knopf / 432 pages / $27.95 It would seem self-evident to declare that the winner of the 2006 Nobel Prize in literature, Turkish writer Orhan Pamuk loves writing. But not all writers do. The famous Algonquin wit, Dorothy Parker, noted wryly, "I hate writing, but love having written." Many of us writers fall into the Parker camp. For us, the act of writing is never fun, it's always arduous and I, like many other serious and productive writers, need a swift kick to get started.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | August 12, 2007
Seizing Destiny How America Grew from Sea to Shining Sea By Richard Kluger Alfred A. Knopf / 649 pages/ $35 Millions of Americans were flocking to the fertile valleys of the Mississippi and following the Missouri to its head springs, President James K. Polk announced in his March 1845 inaugural address. They were "establishing the blessings of self-government" in villages and towns reaching toward the Pacific Ocean. The president promised to protect these patriotic pioneers "wherever they may be upon our soil" and bring American law to "the distant regions which they have selected for their homes."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 14, 1994
NEW YORK -- Pope John Paul II, in a previously secret transaction that surprised the book world, has arranged a multimillion-dollar deal with Alfred A. Knopf to publish a group of his essays late in the fall.The book, called "Crossing the Threshold of Hope," is a discussion of Roman Catholicism and how it relates to the modern era, and will be published as a trade book in the United States, said Sonny Mehta, the publisher and editor in chief at Knopf.Mr. Mehta and his boss, Alberto Vitale, chairman of Random House, obtained the book Tuesday in a deal with Morton L. Janklow, the literary agent who represents the pope's Italian publisher, Mondadori, in the United States.
NEWS
By Robert Hilburn and Robert Hilburn,Los Angeles Times | June 24, 2007
Tearing Down the Wall of Sound The Rise and Fall of Phil Spector By Mick Brown Knopf / 464 pages / $26.95 Even before that horrifying predawn moment four years ago in his castle in the Los Angeles suburb of Alhambra, Phil Spector was widely viewed in the music industry as something of a freak show. Lana Clarkson's death was, in many ways, the tragic public climax of years of wildly eccentric, sometimes alarming behavior by the man who produced landmark recordings by John Lennon, the Righteous Brothers and the Ronettes.
NEWS
By Laura Ciolkowski and Laura Ciolkowski,Chicago Tribune | April 29, 2007
A Handbook to Luck By Cristina Garcia Knopf / 259 pages / $24 On the day a strong autumn wind threw a flock of storks off course, hurling them down to earth near the Havana stage where the magnificent Fernando Florit's magic act was in progress, life was permanently altered for the Florit family. The "hiccup of nature" that entangled one hapless stork in an electrical cable near the stage at precisely the same moment Fernando's Panamanian wife and assistant, Sirena Carranza, was fully submerged in a tank of water to perform the duo's aquarium escape act also left Fernando a widower and his 6-year-old son, Enrique, motherless.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.