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NEWS
May 31, 2004
On May 27, 2004, CHARLES E. ICENHOUR-KNILL; beloved husband of Mary E. Icenhour-Knill (nee Liller); devoted father of Mary E. Siebel, Charles E. Icenhour, Jr., Franklin C. Knill, Karen L. Knill and Mary M. Rosenberger; brother to Frances E. Knill; grandfather to Judy, Nicole, Danielle, Jessica, Lauren, Kristina, Shawn, Franklin, Bradley, Eric, John, Jr., Paul and Michelle. Also survived by three great-grandchildren and honorary daughter Nicole Icenhour. Funeral services at the Connelly Funeral Home of Essex, 300 Mace Avenue, on Wednesday, at 1 P.M. Interment Gardens of Faith Cemetery.
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NEWS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN REPORTER | October 10, 2007
Glenelg's No. 11 field hockey team had plenty of motivation for winning yesterday's game against Mount Hebron - the defending Howard County champion wants to play this year's title game on its home field. A high-scoring team that prefers a fast field like its own, the Gladiators were slowed a little by the Vikings' dense Bermuda grass, but it didn't stop them from scoring. Lauriann Parker had two goals and an assist to lead the Gladiators to a 3-1 victory on senior day at Mount Hebron.
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NEWS
December 9, 1990
OCEAN CITY - C. William Knill, a Mount Airy dairy farmer, was elected vice president of the Maryland Farm Bureau at the group's annual meeting here.Knill will serve a one-year term as one of three state vice presidents, said John F. Butler, field services director for the organization.He was elected unanimously during a voting session Wednesday at the Sheraton Ocean City Resort and Conference Center, Butler said.Carroll County sent about 40 people, including 28 voting delegates, to the meeting.
NEWS
May 31, 2004
On May 27, 2004, CHARLES E. ICENHOUR-KNILL; beloved husband of Mary E. Icenhour-Knill (nee Liller); devoted father of Mary E. Siebel, Charles E. Icenhour, Jr., Franklin C. Knill, Karen L. Knill and Mary M. Rosenberger; brother to Frances E. Knill; grandfather to Judy, Nicole, Danielle, Jessica, Lauren, Kristina, Shawn, Franklin, Bradley, Eric, John, Jr., Paul and Michelle. Also survived by three great-grandchildren and honorary daughter Nicole Icenhour. Funeral services at the Connelly Funeral Home of Essex, 300 Mace Avenue, on Wednesday, at 1 P.M. Interment Gardens of Faith Cemetery.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | December 15, 1991
Mount Airy dairy farmer C. William Knill has been elected president of the Maryland Farm Bureau, the state's largest agricultural group.Knill, who served as a vice president for the state group for the past year, said he was persuaded to run for the top office as the Farm Bureau's annual convention wound down last week in Ocean City.He defeated the incumbent president and first vice president.Knill had planned to run for the first vice president's spot in Wednesday's election, the final day of the convention, but was asked to run for the presidency.
NEWS
By KATHY SUTPHIN | July 7, 1995
Knills' Farm Market is a growing family enterprise nourished on hard work and cooperation that has taken root in the heart of Mount Airy.The market started three years ago with vegetable sales from a wooden cart along the driveway of the Knill farm, east of Route 27 across the road from Watkins Park. Business has grown each summer, enough to warrant a permanent location visible from Ridge Road and closer to Jim and Carol Knill's farm home. The market, which opened for the growing season June 30, is a joint venture of the Knills and Jim's father, Bill Knill.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,Staff Writer | February 8, 1993
From his high school basketball days at Sherwood in Montgomery County to his current duties as coach of the North Carroll girls basketball team, Greg Knill has been able to blend into the background.But Knill, 28, can hide no more.He is putting up some impressive numbers at North Carroll and is the most successful high school basketball coach in Carroll County right now.Knill is 42-21 in three varsity seasons after breaking in with a 20-0 record in one junior-varsity campaign at the school.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,Staff Writer | December 6, 1993
It's been nine months since the Middletown disaster and everybody around the North Carroll girls basketball team is trying to forget it.But it's not easy.Teams just don't get blown away, 71-33, in regional championship games very often. Especially teams that have two accomplished senior players like Michele Jeffery and Ashlee Douglas.That loss was so devastating for North Carroll coach Greg Knill that he has completely revamped his philosophy for this season."I learned a lesson as a coach last season," said Knill.
NEWS
By Christy Kruhm and Christy Kruhm,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 5, 1996
IT'S HARD NOT to notice the endless, neat rows of vegetables lining the outskirts of the Knill farm. During my countless trips commuting on Route 27, I've been watching the growth of vegetable plants through the spring and early summer months, anticipating the arrival of fresh local produce.Only a month or two ago, I noticed the garden showing signs of life, little sprouts pushing through the soil. It seems in no time, many of the plants have reached their full height and are starting to produce a bounty of vegetables.
SPORTS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,Staff Writer | March 19, 1993
It was a senior class North Carroll third-year coach Greg Knill won't soon forget and a 1992-93 season that was equally memorable.The North Carroll Panthers were a heavy favorite to repeat as county champions and they disappointed few, rolling through the county schedule with a 7-0 mark, maintaining a top 20 ranking in the metro area and advancing to the region finals before finishing the season at 18-6.The Panthers have improved every year under Knill, who has compiled a 47-24 mark in his three years as a head coach.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2003
Dressed in flannel and denim, his beefy hands callused and his complexion ruddy, Bill Knill looks every bit the man who has weathered 40 seasons on his family's Carroll County farm. He puts in 12 hours in the fields, barns and greenhouses - and then finds more to be done in a meeting room. His wife, Jean, has been known to slaughter, scald and pluck 50 chickens for her freezer in a morning and spend an afternoon preserving quarts of green beans. She also plays a part in what goes on in classrooms throughout the state.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 13, 2002
A MANCHESTER dairy farm will honor Carroll County's celebration of Farm-City Week with a free farm tour and box lunch Wednesday, compliments of the Carroll County Farm Bureau. Tours will be given at the Harry Sellers family farm, Panora Acres, off Traceys Mill Road. "The purpose of Farm-City Week is to share the understanding of the interdependence of the urban and rural communities," said Jean Knill, farm bureau information director. "We put the producer and consumer together to show where food is coming from and so farmers can understand the needs of the consumer.
NEWS
By Melody Holmes and Melody Holmes,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 23, 2001
Susan Hood and 12-year-old Eliot, the eldest of her five children, go to Knill's Farm in Mount Airy about this time every year, greeted by the chilly October wind, to shop for pumpkins. They buy several for carving jack-o'-lanterns and others for baking autumn treats. Hood explained the rules for pumpkin shopping. "It has to be a bright, deep orange, with a good stem that has a nice curl to it. We try to get a variety of different-shaped and -sized pumpkins and see how they look together," Hood said.
NEWS
By Melody Holmes and Melody Holmes,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 23, 2001
Susan Hood and 12-year-old Eliot, the eldest of her five children, go to Knill's Farm in Mount Airy about this time every year, greeted by the chilly October wind, to shop for pumpkins. They buy several for carving jack-o'-lanterns and others for baking autumn treats. Hood explained the rules for pumpkin shopping. "It has to be a bright, deep orange, with a good stem that has a nice curl to it. We try to get a variety of different-shaped and -sized pumpkins and see how they look together," she said.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | November 26, 1998
The food on the table at a farm family Thanksgiving is not just something to eat. It was once something to grow, something to harvest, something to put up.For the Knill family of Mount Airy, vegetables and beef cattle raised on its 600-acre farm will end up on the table today as mashed potatoes, green beans, and pumpkin and mincemeat pies. The centerpiece -- the turkey -- is a gift from a fellow farmer who worked for them as a boy."There's a certain amount of self-reliance you get used to when you raise your own food," said Jean Knill, whose husband, William, and son, James, work the farm that William's father started in 1939.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1998
North Carroll, the most improved squad in the county, will be making its first trip to the state golf tournament as a team when the annual championship is held next Monday-Tuesday at the University of Maryland GC in College Park.The Panthers, with four sophomore scorers, just got in under the required 340 score needed to advance, with a 339 to tie for third in District V of Class 3A-4A. Westminster won the title with a runaway 314.Francis Scott Key (337) tied Mount Hebron for the Class 1A-2A title, and qualified as a team for the second straight year.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | November 26, 1998
The food on the table at a farm family Thanksgiving is not just something to eat. It was once something to grow, something to harvest, something to put up.For the Knill family of Mount Airy, vegetables and beef cattle raised on its 600-acre farm will end up on the table today as mashed potatoes, green beans, and pumpkin and mincemeat pies. The centerpiece -- the turkey -- is a gift from a fellow farmer who worked for them as a boy."There's a certain amount of self-reliance you get used to when you raise your own food," said Jean Knill, whose husband, William, and son, James, work the farm that William's father started in 1939.
NEWS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN REPORTER | October 10, 2007
Glenelg's No. 11 field hockey team had plenty of motivation for winning yesterday's game against Mount Hebron - the defending Howard County champion wants to play this year's title game on its home field. A high-scoring team that prefers a fast field like its own, the Gladiators were slowed a little by the Vikings' dense Bermuda grass, but it didn't stop them from scoring. Lauriann Parker had two goals and an assist to lead the Gladiators to a 3-1 victory on senior day at Mount Hebron.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1998
Corn stands as tall as eight feet across Maryland farmlands, growing into what promises to be a bumper crop.That's good news for consumers, hungry for one of Maryland's favorite summer side dishes.But it might be bad news for farmers, who might be unable to cash in on their golden fields."We are looking at a great crop but drastic prices," said Kelly Hereth, executive director of the Carroll County Farm Service Agency.Maryland corn usually hits its peak in August, and consumer demand appears to be high for sweeter varieties that keep their flavor longer -- one reason local groceries and roadside stands are stocking more corn.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1997
Unbeaten North Carroll hustled, scrapped and made enough points to stay with taller Walkersville for 26 minutes, then settled down for the final six to play better and hold off the visitors last night, 53-48.No more than five points separated the two teams until North Carroll, giving away inches at four starting positions, got its up-tempo game working and converted some passes into baskets.Ahead 44-41 with 4: 30 left, the Panthers' Danielle Shearer sank a free throw to complete a three-point play, and after the sides swapped baskets, the home team widened the margin.
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