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NEWS
January 12, 1992
The place of sport in American life and society will be the theme of"Ethics and Athletics," the sixth lecture in the Great Issues Series, at 9 a.m. Jan. 25 at the Francis Scott Key Auditorium lobby, St. John's College, Annapolis.Two figures from the sports world will keynote the forum: prize-winning newspaper writer and editor Creed C. Black, president of the Knight Foundation, which sponsored the Knight Commission study of sports in higher education; and Wimbledon and U.S. Open champion Arthur Ashe, who has used his continuing career to promote tennis at every level as well as for various philanthropies.
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SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | June 22, 2008
The Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics can always be counted on for spirited debate, intense scrutiny and strong recommendations in its semi-annual meetings. The most fascinating product of last week's get-together in Washington, however, concerned a topic on which no resolution was reached - or could be. It likely has more bearing on the progress, or regression, of the best-known college athletes than anything else discussed. It's composed of several elements - the NBA age limit, one-and-done basketball players, and the NCAA's graduation rates and Academic Progress Rates, just for starters - but it's tied into one issue: getting young men, mostly young black men, into college and getting them out in better condition than when they went in. That's why the contributions of Len Elmore and Paul Hewitt to the Knight Commission meeting packed more of a punch than any recommendations that were made.
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SPORTS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | October 16, 2007
Washington -- At universities with big-time football and basketball programs, professors know better than to step in front of the freight train of commercialized sports, a law school dean told the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics yesterday. "They know they're going to get run over" if they try to push athletic reforms, said Gary Roberts, dean of the Indiana University School of Law and a former faculty athletics representative at Tulane. "So why bother? "At the end of the day, this is the entertainment industry and not the education business, and the faculty doesn't have much to say about it," Roberts declared at a Faculty Summit on Intercollegiate Athletics.
SPORTS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | October 16, 2007
Washington -- At universities with big-time football and basketball programs, professors know better than to step in front of the freight train of commercialized sports, a law school dean told the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics yesterday. "They know they're going to get run over" if they try to push athletic reforms, said Gary Roberts, dean of the Indiana University School of Law and a former faculty athletics representative at Tulane. "So why bother? "At the end of the day, this is the entertainment industry and not the education business, and the faculty doesn't have much to say about it," Roberts declared at a Faculty Summit on Intercollegiate Athletics.
SPORTS
March 7, 1991
Ailing Payne Stewart to miss at least 5 weeksPayne Stewart is wearing a neck brace and facing the loss of at least five weeks -- possibly more -- from his PGA Tour schedule."
SPORTS
November 11, 1995
TennisDefending champ Anke Huber bounced Gabriela Sabatini from the $800,000 Advanta Championships in Philadelphia for the second straight year yesterday, upsetting the No. 4 seed, 7-5, 6-2.Huber, seeded seventh, will face unseeded Lori McNeil in the semifinals today. McNeil, ranked No. 63 in the world, upset second-ranked Conchita Martinez, 6-7 (3-7), 6-3, 6-2.In today's other semifinal, top-seeded Steffi Graf, who advanced with a straight-set win Thursday night over qualifier Meredith McGrath, faces the winner of last night's quarterfinal between unseeded Zina Garrison-Jackson, who defeated Irina Spirlea of Romania, 6-1, 5-7, 6-4.Courier upset: Top-seeded American Jim Courier was knocked out of the Stockholm Open, losing a quarterfinal match to David Prinosil, 6-3, 7-6 (7-4)
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN REPORTER | October 5, 2007
The Maryland men's basketball team's 0 percent graduation rate for players entering school from 1997 to 2000 is "an atrocity," a member of the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics said yesterday. Commission member Hodding Carter III, a public policy professor at the University of North Carolina, said he was concerned not only about Maryland's graduation rate, but also about men's basketball programs around the country whose rates lag behind those of other sports. The overall rate for men's basketball players who graduated within six years was 61 percent, lowest among 18 men's sports, according to NCAA data released this week.
NEWS
By John Harris III and John Harris III,Staff writer | January 27, 1992
Big contracts for athletes and megabuck television deals have brought new meaning to the phrase, "win at all costs."Scores and game stories now share space on the sports pages with accounts of scandals and academic probation.Cleaning up sports' tarnished image was discussed Saturday by 250participants at the "Ethics and Athletics" forum, the sixth in a series of public debates sponsored by St. John's College.The four-hour seminar in the Francis Scott Key Auditorium attracted high school and college coaches and athletes, who listened to former tennis star Arthur Ashe and prize-winning newspaper writer and editor Creed Carter Black.
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,Sun reporter | May 15, 2007
Washington -- Earlier this semester, when Maryland guards D.J. Strawberry and Mike Jones left the university in pursuit of professional basketball careers, they followed in the footsteps of dozens of former players - including ex-Terp Len Elmore, who in 1974 skipped out of College Park early to join the NBA. "My admission has been always that I kind of blew off my second semester way back in 1974 in order to prepare myself for the pros," said Elmore, who...
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | June 22, 2008
The Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics can always be counted on for spirited debate, intense scrutiny and strong recommendations in its semi-annual meetings. The most fascinating product of last week's get-together in Washington, however, concerned a topic on which no resolution was reached - or could be. It likely has more bearing on the progress, or regression, of the best-known college athletes than anything else discussed. It's composed of several elements - the NBA age limit, one-and-done basketball players, and the NCAA's graduation rates and Academic Progress Rates, just for starters - but it's tied into one issue: getting young men, mostly young black men, into college and getting them out in better condition than when they went in. That's why the contributions of Len Elmore and Paul Hewitt to the Knight Commission meeting packed more of a punch than any recommendations that were made.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN REPORTER | October 5, 2007
The Maryland men's basketball team's 0 percent graduation rate for players entering school from 1997 to 2000 is "an atrocity," a member of the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics said yesterday. Commission member Hodding Carter III, a public policy professor at the University of North Carolina, said he was concerned not only about Maryland's graduation rate, but also about men's basketball programs around the country whose rates lag behind those of other sports. The overall rate for men's basketball players who graduated within six years was 61 percent, lowest among 18 men's sports, according to NCAA data released this week.
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,Sun reporter | May 15, 2007
Washington -- Earlier this semester, when Maryland guards D.J. Strawberry and Mike Jones left the university in pursuit of professional basketball careers, they followed in the footsteps of dozens of former players - including ex-Terp Len Elmore, who in 1974 skipped out of College Park early to join the NBA. "My admission has been always that I kind of blew off my second semester way back in 1974 in order to prepare myself for the pros," said Elmore, who...
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN REPORTER | January 23, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Until a few years ago, DeMatha Catholic High football coach Bill McGregor believed he had college recruiters under control. He wouldn't give a player's cell or home phone number to college coaches. If recruiters wanted to make contact, they had to come to his office. But today, those same coaches, along with boosters and reporters from recruiting Web sites, have any number of ways to reach players. It might be through a text message; it might be on a teenager's MySpace page; it might be on a chat board associated with a college.
SPORTS
November 11, 1995
TennisDefending champ Anke Huber bounced Gabriela Sabatini from the $800,000 Advanta Championships in Philadelphia for the second straight year yesterday, upsetting the No. 4 seed, 7-5, 6-2.Huber, seeded seventh, will face unseeded Lori McNeil in the semifinals today. McNeil, ranked No. 63 in the world, upset second-ranked Conchita Martinez, 6-7 (3-7), 6-3, 6-2.In today's other semifinal, top-seeded Steffi Graf, who advanced with a straight-set win Thursday night over qualifier Meredith McGrath, faces the winner of last night's quarterfinal between unseeded Zina Garrison-Jackson, who defeated Irina Spirlea of Romania, 6-1, 5-7, 6-4.Courier upset: Top-seeded American Jim Courier was knocked out of the Stockholm Open, losing a quarterfinal match to David Prinosil, 6-3, 7-6 (7-4)
SPORTS
By Ed Sherman and Ed Sherman,Chicago Tribune | December 2, 1992
CHICAGO -- The so-called college reform movement still doesn't take the place of winning streaks.In big-time college sports, the name of the game remains winning, winning, winning, rather than reform, reform, reform. Principle is good, but won-lost records are more important.For further evidence, see Arkansas. The Razorbacks completed their coaching trilogy Monday by hiring Danny Ford, a coach who stands for winning and little else.Athletic director Frank Broyles certainly didn't mind, considering he fired Jack Crowe after the first game of the season and then didn't offer interim coach Joe Kines the job. Broyles wanted an experienced winner, and he got one in Ford, who won a national championship for Clemson.
NEWS
By John Harris III and John Harris III,Staff writer | January 27, 1992
Big contracts for athletes and megabuck television deals have brought new meaning to the phrase, "win at all costs."Scores and game stories now share space on the sports pages with accounts of scandals and academic probation.Cleaning up sports' tarnished image was discussed Saturday by 250participants at the "Ethics and Athletics" forum, the sixth in a series of public debates sponsored by St. John's College.The four-hour seminar in the Francis Scott Key Auditorium attracted high school and college coaches and athletes, who listened to former tennis star Arthur Ashe and prize-winning newspaper writer and editor Creed Carter Black.
SPORTS
By Ed Sherman and Ed Sherman,Chicago Tribune | December 2, 1992
CHICAGO -- The so-called college reform movement still doesn't take the place of winning streaks.In big-time college sports, the name of the game remains winning, winning, winning, rather than reform, reform, reform. Principle is good, but won-lost records are more important.For further evidence, see Arkansas. The Razorbacks completed their coaching trilogy Monday by hiring Danny Ford, a coach who stands for winning and little else.Athletic director Frank Broyles certainly didn't mind, considering he fired Jack Crowe after the first game of the season and then didn't offer interim coach Joe Kines the job. Broyles wanted an experienced winner, and he got one in Ford, who won a national championship for Clemson.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN REPORTER | January 23, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Until a few years ago, DeMatha Catholic High football coach Bill McGregor believed he had college recruiters under control. He wouldn't give a player's cell or home phone number to college coaches. If recruiters wanted to make contact, they had to come to his office. But today, those same coaches, along with boosters and reporters from recruiting Web sites, have any number of ways to reach players. It might be through a text message; it might be on a teenager's MySpace page; it might be on a chat board associated with a college.
NEWS
January 12, 1992
The place of sport in American life and society will be the theme of"Ethics and Athletics," the sixth lecture in the Great Issues Series, at 9 a.m. Jan. 25 at the Francis Scott Key Auditorium lobby, St. John's College, Annapolis.Two figures from the sports world will keynote the forum: prize-winning newspaper writer and editor Creed C. Black, president of the Knight Foundation, which sponsored the Knight Commission study of sports in higher education; and Wimbledon and U.S. Open champion Arthur Ashe, who has used his continuing career to promote tennis at every level as well as for various philanthropies.
SPORTS
March 7, 1991
Ailing Payne Stewart to miss at least 5 weeksPayne Stewart is wearing a neck brace and facing the loss of at least five weeks -- possibly more -- from his PGA Tour schedule."
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