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NEWS
By Laura King and Laura King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 17, 2005
JERUSALEM - Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's landmark initiative to uproot the Jewish settlements in the Gaza Strip won final parliamentary approval last night after two days of acrimonious debate. The measure, which authorizes nearly $1 billion in compensation payments for the approximately 8,000 settlers who are to be evacuated, passed 59-40, despite furious protests from right-wing members of parliament who were once the prime minister's closest allies. The plan still needs final endorsement by Sharon's divided Cabinet, a showdown vote that is scheduled for Sunday.
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NEWS
February 8, 2014
William Cooper completely misstated the rules of Israeli citizenship in a recent letter to the editor ( "Israel is not a 'democracy,'" Feb. 4). Jewishness is not a prerequisite for citizenship here, as attested to by the 21 percent of Israeli citizens who are non-Jewish Arabs, as well as others who are neither Jewish nor Arab but citizens of Israel, nonetheless. Moreover, all citizens of Israel have the same rights under the law - and they vote. Just ask any of the Arab Members of the Knesset who rely on those Arab votes to get elected.
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NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau | September 22, 1993
JERUSALEM -- Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin is counting on a paper-thin majority of the Israeli parliament to approve his agreement with the Palestine Liberation Organization."
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 25, 2007
JERUSALEM -- Facing possible indictment on rape and sexual harassment charges, Israeli President Moshe Katsav angrily defied calls to quit but asked yesterday for a temporary leave while he fights to clear his name. Katsav's request was unlikely to quell calls for his resignation a day after Attorney General Menachem Mazuz said he was prepared to indict. Mazuz said his decision would depend on the outcome of a still-unscheduled hearing at which the president could rebut the charges, which involve former female staff members.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,SUN FOREIGN STAFF Joshua Brilliant contributed to this article | September 30, 1995
JERUSALEM -- This is the nightmare for Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin: He returns from Washington where President Clinton and the world watched him sign the latest accord with the Palestinians, only to have his own parliament reject it.The scenario is a real possibility. Mr. Rabin's lieutenants scrambled yesterday to try to bolster the government's support for the agreement before Thursday's vote or parliament.Mr. Rabin can count on no more than a one- or two-vote margin of approval.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau | May 24, 1992
JERUSALEM -- In 1980, the secretary of a California businesswoman opened a package for her boss and found a strange device labeled "a new age of computer sales and advertising." Patricia Wilkerson plugged it in, triggering a bomb explosion that killed her.The chief suspects in that bombing are the latest candidates for the Israeli parliament.Robert and Rochelle Manning, who are in an Israeli prison fighting extradition to the United States, have been nominated for the Knesset by supporters trying to prevent their criminal trial.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 6, 1991
JERUSALEM -- With bombs and votes, Israel's government made clear yesterday that its restraint in the Persian Gulf war has not softened its hard-line attitude toward Palestinians. However, it did begin easing the curfew under which the occupied territories have lived since the war broke out.The Knesset, Israel's parliament, voted last night to include in the Cabinet a controversial right-winger who advocates emptying the occupied territories of 1.7 million Palestinians and who has called for immediate retaliation against Iraq.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau | May 20, 1992
JERUSALEM -- What Israel needs to become heaven on Earth is a few dozen "coherence generators," contends Ami Rokeah, a former Air Force pilot and current candidate for the Knesset.These are not electrical devices. They are people, like Mr. Rokeah, who practice transcendental meditation, and the installation of meditating ministers in the government is the chief platform of Mr. Rokeah's "Natural Law Party."His is one of dozens of small and seemingly hopeless parties that registered in advance of last night's deadline to file candidacies for the June 23 national elections in Israel.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 4, 2004
JERUSALEM - The Israeli parliament gave preliminary approval yesterday for compensation payments to Jewish settlers who are to be uprooted under Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's plan for withdrawing from the Gaza Strip. The bill's passage in the Knesset is a critical step for the pullout plan, which envisions abandoning all 21 Jewish settlements in the Gaza Strip and four in the northern West Bank. The compensation package, which passed 64-44 with nine abstentions, is the first measure that includes the details of the withdrawal, calling for payments that would run about $300,000 per family.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | February 4, 1992
JERUSALEM -- Ezer Weizman, the swashbuckling architect of Israel's air force, who went from being a leading hawk to a peacemaker with Egypt, abruptly has announced that he was leaving the Knesset and retiring from political life.Citing frustration with the right-wing government's handling of the peace process and the squabbling drift of the opposition Labor Party, Mr. Weizman, 68, said yesterday he was unable to shape events to his satisfaction and, as a result, was stepping aside.Referring to recent Middle East peace negotiations in Spain and Russia, Mr. Weizman, most recently a Labor member of Parliament, said: "I waited for Madrid.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 17, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Israel's president, dogged by rape allegations and calls for his resignation, sat out the opening of the parliament's winter session yesterday after police recommended he be indicted. Some members of the Knesset had threatened to boycott the ceremony or to stay in their seats if President Moshe Katsav took part in it. It is customary for lawmakers to rise as the president, whose post is largely ceremonial, takes his place in the gallery seats reserved for dignitaries. Katsav, who has denied the accusations, decided to skip the session after police recommended Sunday that prosecutors indict him on rape and other sexual misconduct charges involving former female employees.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 29, 2005
JERUSALEM - Prime Minister Ariel Sharon won a key battle yesterday against opponents of his plan to withdraw from the Gaza Strip when Israeli lawmakers overwhelmingly voted down a bill calling for a nationwide referendum on the pullout. The referendum proposal was a last-ditch legislative effort by settlers and their political allies to head off the withdrawal, set for the summer. Their efforts are likely to shift to trying to block the evacuation through civil disobedience and protest actions.
NEWS
By Laura King and Laura King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 17, 2005
JERUSALEM - Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's landmark initiative to uproot the Jewish settlements in the Gaza Strip won final parliamentary approval last night after two days of acrimonious debate. The measure, which authorizes nearly $1 billion in compensation payments for the approximately 8,000 settlers who are to be evacuated, passed 59-40, despite furious protests from right-wing members of parliament who were once the prime minister's closest allies. The plan still needs final endorsement by Sharon's divided Cabinet, a showdown vote that is scheduled for Sunday.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 4, 2004
JERUSALEM - The Israeli parliament gave preliminary approval yesterday for compensation payments to Jewish settlers who are to be uprooted under Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's plan for withdrawing from the Gaza Strip. The bill's passage in the Knesset is a critical step for the pullout plan, which envisions abandoning all 21 Jewish settlements in the Gaza Strip and four in the northern West Bank. The compensation package, which passed 64-44 with nine abstentions, is the first measure that includes the details of the withdrawal, calling for payments that would run about $300,000 per family.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 23, 2004
JERUSALEM - Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon went before parliament yesterday to defend his proposal to evacuate 25 Jewish settlements in the Gaza Strip and West Bank, as one poll indicated a narrowing lead in support of the plan among Likud Party members, who vote on it May 2. In his speech to the Knesset, Sharon warned fellow Likud members that voting down the unilateral withdrawal would jeopardize new U.S. backing for two important Israeli positions:...
NEWS
By Hirsh Goodman | July 16, 2000
JERUSALEM -- A former education minister and leader of the left-wing Meretz Party said with his usual acerbity the other day that Israel has many politicians but too few statesmen. Ehud Barak, he added, is a statesman. Yossi Sarid made his comment hours after the Knesset, or parliament, passed a vote of no-confidence in the government against the backdrop of Mr. Barak's decision to attend the Camp David summit. To make matters worse, in addition to the parliamentary vote against him that morning, Mr. Barak's coalition partners were jumping ship faster than the media could track them.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 12, 1996
JERUSALEM -- The Israeli attorney general has announced his intention to charge Ehud Olmert, the mayor of Jerusalem, with fraud in a scheme to raise funds for right-wing candidates in the 1988 elections for Parliament.The felony charges would put a cloud over the political career of Olmert, 50, an adviser to Prime Minister-elect Benjamin Netanyahu, and a rising star in the Likud bloc. Formal charges could short-circuit Olmert's rumored appointment to Netanyahu's Cabinet.A spokesman for the mayor said Olmert would have no comment on the matter until he receives "all the official documents."
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 1, 1999
JERUSALEM -- After more than 40 days and 40 nights of marathon negotiations, Israeli Prime Minister-elect Ehud Barak yesterday succeeded in forming a diverse government with a comfortable enough parliamentary majority to revive the stalled Arab-Israeli peace process.Barak, the self-proclaimed "prime minister of everyone," informed the acting speaker of Israel's parliament that he would present his government next week; he is required to do so by July 9.Once the Knesset approves Barak's appointments, the 57-year-old former military chief of staff will begin his 4-year term with an unusually comfortable majority in the 120-member parliament, eight more than the required 61. That's an advantage enjoyed neither by outgoing Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu nor Barak's mentor, the late Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin.
TOPIC
By Aron U. Raskas | May 23, 1999
AMID THE patchwork of winners and losers of the Israeli election last week, the traditional concept of Am Yisrael -- a unified Israel -- was dealt perhaps the greatest setback by voters. No longer can the Jewish people claim to be "one nation" in their own land. After this election, Israeli society is more fragmented than ever.Yet the election's results could serve as the catalyst for the statesmanship necessary to bridge Israel's broad divides.The two-vote system (one for prime minister and one for parliament)
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