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Knee Replacement

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HEALTH
December 7, 2009
More than 500,000 people have knee replacements each year, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. Dr. Daniel Tang, an orthopedic surgeon at Howard County General Hospital, discusses the purpose of and the procedures involved in the surgery. •The purpose of a knee replacement is to relieve a person's pain, restore movement, restore alignment and remove the impairments to activities of daily living. The ideal candidate for a knee replacement is a generally healthy individual who has failed conservative management of arthritis and who is past the age of 60. Persons with issues of diabetes, peripheral vascular disease and obesity have increased risk factors for the replacement of a joint.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2014
Three months ago, Cindy Colvin could barely walk. Shopping sprees to feed her "first addiction, retail" were out of the question, as were the essentials - getting groceries, tending to household chores and making it into work. "I didn't know how to walk anymore," said Colvin, 55. "I wasn't walking like a normal person. Just to take a step, every single step, was agony. " With knees so swollen she "couldn't remember normal" and a constant throbbing throughout both legs, the Avondale, Pa., resident drove an hour and a half to Baltimore to see OrthoMaryland's Dr. Barry Waldman, who promised a new life made possible by 3D printing.
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HEALTH
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2014
Three months ago, Cindy Colvin could barely walk. Shopping sprees to feed her "first addiction, retail" were out of the question, as were the essentials - getting groceries, tending to household chores and making it into work. "I didn't know how to walk anymore," said Colvin, 55. "I wasn't walking like a normal person. Just to take a step, every single step, was agony. " With knees so swollen she "couldn't remember normal" and a constant throbbing throughout both legs, the Avondale, Pa., resident drove an hour and a half to Baltimore to see OrthoMaryland's Dr. Barry Waldman, who promised a new life made possible by 3D printing.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
GREENSBORO, N.C. - The pained look Maryland athletic director Kevin Anderson has worn for most of the past two months has had more to do with his recovery from knee replacement surgery than what he endured watching the Terps men's basketball team's disappointing season. The solemn look was there Thursday, but this time it had more to do with the Terps' losing another close game than with his new knee. Anderson, who signed Mark Turgeon to an eight-year contract after Gary Williams retired suddenly in March 2011, said he still has faith that the Terps will turn it around.
NEWS
By Susan Thornton Hobby and Susan Thornton Hobby,Special to the Sun | February 16, 2007
Marlene Freed knows what's coming. For 10 relaxing minutes, she has been lying on her back, with ice chilling the swollen tissue around a seven-inch scar on her right leg -- the spot where doctors inserted her new titanium knee. The 68-year-old Olney resident is laughing and chatting. But when physical therapist Chris Gnip climbs onto the table and starts to bend her knee, pushing it carefully but relentlessly toward her chest, Freed clams up. She closes her eyes and starts to breathe deeply.
NEWS
By NICOLE FULLER and NICOLE FULLER,SUN REPORTER | May 11, 2006
Nearly everyone had a story of going from pain to nearly instant rejuvenation at the hands of Dr. James Wenz, who died more than two years ago with his wife in a horrific crash in Baltimore County. There was Gregory Schaffer, president of Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, whose wife's double knee replacement surgery was performed by Wenz, an orthopedic surgeon who pioneered smaller incisions for joint replacement surgery, greatly speeding his patients' recovery. And John Sibrea, who had knee replacement surgery about two weeks before Wenz died.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
GREENSBORO, N.C. - The pained look Maryland athletic director Kevin Anderson has worn for most of the past two months has had more to do with his recovery from knee replacement surgery than what he endured watching the Terps men's basketball team's disappointing season. The solemn look was there Thursday, but this time it had more to do with the Terps' losing another close game than with his new knee. Anderson, who signed Mark Turgeon to an eight-year contract after Gary Williams retired suddenly in March 2011, said he still has faith that the Terps will turn it around.
NEWS
October 26, 2012
Caregivers and seniors Family and Children's Services of Central Maryland has recently received an 18-month, $500,000 challenge grant from the Maryland Home and Community Care Foundation and additional funding from the Howard County Department of Citizen Services. SERVE (Services, Education and Resources for Vulnerable Elders) will improve the safety of seniors, enhance the quality of life for caregivers, help families find the services needed, prevent premature institutionalization and reduce incidents of elder abuse and neglect.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2013
Here are some thoughts from the Orioles about the news earlier today that top pitching prospect, 20-year-old right-hander Dylan Bundy, will have elbow ligament (Tommy John surgery) Thursday in Florida .   Orioles manager Buck Showalter on the severity of the news:   “It's because of where he was drafted and what our hopes are. I look at it if it were someone that had already pitched well, had established themselves in the big leagues. He had some roads to cross and this might help him some in certain situations.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2012
Most of the Orioles had already cleaned out their lockers at Camden Yards by Saturday afternoon, when just a few stragglers were tossing their possessions into cardboard boxes to mark the symbolic end to baseball in Baltimore this season. Outside, a few dozen fans still lingered for one final sight of their favorite players. Executive vice president Dan Duquette stopped by to sign autographs. The Orioles had a remarkable turnaround in 2012 - going from 93 losses in 2011 to 93 wins in the regular season, then falling just one win short of playing for the American League title - but the finality had hit manager Buck Showalter.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2013
Here are some thoughts from the Orioles about the news earlier today that top pitching prospect, 20-year-old right-hander Dylan Bundy, will have elbow ligament (Tommy John surgery) Thursday in Florida .   Orioles manager Buck Showalter on the severity of the news:   “It's because of where he was drafted and what our hopes are. I look at it if it were someone that had already pitched well, had established themselves in the big leagues. He had some roads to cross and this might help him some in certain situations.
NEWS
October 26, 2012
Caregivers and seniors Family and Children's Services of Central Maryland has recently received an 18-month, $500,000 challenge grant from the Maryland Home and Community Care Foundation and additional funding from the Howard County Department of Citizen Services. SERVE (Services, Education and Resources for Vulnerable Elders) will improve the safety of seniors, enhance the quality of life for caregivers, help families find the services needed, prevent premature institutionalization and reduce incidents of elder abuse and neglect.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2012
Most of the Orioles had already cleaned out their lockers at Camden Yards by Saturday afternoon, when just a few stragglers were tossing their possessions into cardboard boxes to mark the symbolic end to baseball in Baltimore this season. Outside, a few dozen fans still lingered for one final sight of their favorite players. Executive vice president Dan Duquette stopped by to sign autographs. The Orioles had a remarkable turnaround in 2012 - going from 93 losses in 2011 to 93 wins in the regular season, then falling just one win short of playing for the American League title - but the finality had hit manager Buck Showalter.
HEALTH
December 7, 2009
More than 500,000 people have knee replacements each year, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. Dr. Daniel Tang, an orthopedic surgeon at Howard County General Hospital, discusses the purpose of and the procedures involved in the surgery. •The purpose of a knee replacement is to relieve a person's pain, restore movement, restore alignment and remove the impairments to activities of daily living. The ideal candidate for a knee replacement is a generally healthy individual who has failed conservative management of arthritis and who is past the age of 60. Persons with issues of diabetes, peripheral vascular disease and obesity have increased risk factors for the replacement of a joint.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Reporter | July 26, 2007
For some people, simply jogging or playing a friendly game of tennis comes with reminders of the passage of time: creaking knees and aching hips. Although these symptoms often can be treated with rest, therapy and medication, nearly 500,000 Americans each year receive knee replacements, says Dr. Brian Mulliken, a joint replacement specialist at St. Joseph Medical Center/Orthopaedic Associates. Another 300,000 people receive hip replacements. And, as the population ages, that number grows annually.
NEWS
By Susan Thornton Hobby and Susan Thornton Hobby,Special to the Sun | February 16, 2007
Marlene Freed knows what's coming. For 10 relaxing minutes, she has been lying on her back, with ice chilling the swollen tissue around a seven-inch scar on her right leg -- the spot where doctors inserted her new titanium knee. The 68-year-old Olney resident is laughing and chatting. But when physical therapist Chris Gnip climbs onto the table and starts to bend her knee, pushing it carefully but relentlessly toward her chest, Freed clams up. She closes her eyes and starts to breathe deeply.
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