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By New York Times News Service | January 12, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Transportation Department yesterday gave final approval for Northwest Airlines and KLM Royal Dutch Airlines to integrate their services and operate as a single carrier.An open-skies agreement in September between the United States and the Netherlands gave the carriers of both countries unlimited access to the other's international market.It was the department's second move toward airline internationalization. Last week it approved a proposal by Air Canada and a group of Fort Worth, Texas, businessmen to invest $450 million in Continental Airlines.
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SPORTS
By Matt Vensel and The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
Each week, Baltimore Sun blogger and reporter Matt Vensel will fire a few questions at a random Ravens rookie. This week it was sixth-rounder Kapron Lewis-Moore, who is on injured reserve with a knee injury. MV: It has been like a redshirt year for you coming in with your knee injury. What goals have you set for yourself in your first year in the NFL knowing that you won't set foot on the field until next year? KLM: My number one priority is to get my knee healthy and strong so I can get back on the field.
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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | November 20, 1992
KLM Royal Dutch Airlines said yesterday that it is prepared to inject $50 million into Northwest Airlines to help the ailing American carrier's effort to persuade its banks to extend a new credit line of $300 million.Meanwhile, all six of Northwest's unions said they saw a need to grant the carrier concessions of $300 million a year and that they were prepared to begin negotiations.A group of banks led by Bankers Trust is seeking to put together a $300 million loan package, but some banks have been reluctant to go along until other investors make a commitment.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 1, 2003
Air France's planned takeover of KLM Royal Dutch Airlines NV, which would create Europe's largest airline, may spur more combinations as carriers try to cut costs after two years of losses. "There will be just three or four major carriers who will dominate the airline industry over the next five to 10 years," Rigas Doganis, the former chief executive of Greece's Olympic Airways, said in an interview in London yesterday. Air France, Europe's second-largest airline, has offered 784 million euros ($913 million)
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | January 14, 1993
KLM Royal Dutch Airlines is considering ending its service at Baltimore-Washington International Airport and shifting its flights to BWI's chief international competitor, Dulles International Airport, near Washington in Northern Virginia.The move would be a significant setback for BWI, which is relying heavily on growth in international traffic as its volume of domestic passengers declines. The Dutch airline now offers three nonstop flights each week to Amsterdam but no service out of Dulles.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 1, 2003
Air France's planned takeover of KLM Royal Dutch Airlines NV, which would create Europe's largest airline, may spur more combinations as carriers try to cut costs after two years of losses. "There will be just three or four major carriers who will dominate the airline industry over the next five to 10 years," Rigas Doganis, the former chief executive of Greece's Olympic Airways, said in an interview in London yesterday. Air France, Europe's second-largest airline, has offered 784 million euros ($913 million)
NEWS
By New York Times News Service The Chicago Tribune contributed to this article | November 17, 1992
In a thrust aimed at opening the skies above the United States and Europe to more international competition, the Transportation Department yesterday approved a request by Northwest Airlines and KLM Royal Dutch Airlines to merge and function as one airline and to cooperate in crucial areas such as pricing and strategy.Although the order approving the application was preliminary, and other carriers may file objections in the next 14 days, the agency has rarely reversed itself.If the order takes effect in 21 days, as expected, a foreign and a domestic airline, for the first time, would have the ability to function as one carrier even though legally they would remain separate companies.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1992
GM cancels some new modelsGeneral Motors Corp. is putting the brakes on several new-model projects to conserve cash, according to a published report yesterday.Meanwhile, the automaker is warning local and state governments that up to 21,200 United Auto Workers drawing benefits from an income security fund could be laid off in January.The trade journal Automotive News reported GM has canceled a redesign of its Buick Century and Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera, both assembled in Oklahoma City. The plant will continue to build the existing models of the cars, introduced in 1982 and slightly restyled in 1989.
BUSINESS
June 3, 1994
AlliedSignal wins large Boeing pactAlliedSignal Inc. said yesterday that it had won a contract to provide up to $2 billion worth of equipment for the Boeing Co.'s next-generation 737 airliner.The Sundstrand Corp., based in Rockford, Ill., came up the loser in the months-long competition to make auxiliary power units for Boeing's most popular narrow-body jetliner. The first plane is scheduled for delivery to Southwest Airlines in October 1997.Industry analysts said the award affirms that AlliedSignal, a diversified manufacturer based in Morristown, N.J., has paid heed to glitches in quality, technology and service that hurt the company in the late 1980s.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel and The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
Each week, Baltimore Sun blogger and reporter Matt Vensel will fire a few questions at a random Ravens rookie. This week it was sixth-rounder Kapron Lewis-Moore, who is on injured reserve with a knee injury. MV: It has been like a redshirt year for you coming in with your knee injury. What goals have you set for yourself in your first year in the NFL knowing that you won't set foot on the field until next year? KLM: My number one priority is to get my knee healthy and strong so I can get back on the field.
BUSINESS
June 3, 1994
AlliedSignal wins large Boeing pactAlliedSignal Inc. said yesterday that it had won a contract to provide up to $2 billion worth of equipment for the Boeing Co.'s next-generation 737 airliner.The Sundstrand Corp., based in Rockford, Ill., came up the loser in the months-long competition to make auxiliary power units for Boeing's most popular narrow-body jetliner. The first plane is scheduled for delivery to Southwest Airlines in October 1997.Industry analysts said the award affirms that AlliedSignal, a diversified manufacturer based in Morristown, N.J., has paid heed to glitches in quality, technology and service that hurt the company in the late 1980s.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Suzanne Wooton and Ross Hetrick and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writers | February 20, 1993
An article Saturday about KLM Royal Dutch Airlines leaving Baltimore-Washington International Airport for Dulles International Airport reported incorrectly the number of airlines still providing international service from BWI. Nine airlines and three chartered carriers continue international flights from BWI.The Sun regrets the errors.KLM Royal Dutch Airlines announced yesterday that it will leave the Baltimore-Washington International Airport in mid-May and, instead, begin offering flights from Dulles International Airport in Northern Virginia.
NEWS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | February 17, 1993
Construction of a long-awaited international terminal at Baltimore-Washington International Airport has been postponed because of the expected loss of a major European carrier and the continued slump in the airline industry.State officials said yesterday that the $120 million terminal would not be built next year as planned, even though the facility was seen as crucial to attracting more international passengers to the underused airport."Basically, we're putting it off," said Secretary of Transportation O. James Lighthizer.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | January 14, 1993
KLM Royal Dutch Airlines is considering ending its service at Baltimore-Washington International Airport and shifting its flights to BWI's chief international competitor, Dulles International Airport, near Washington in Northern Virginia.The move would be a significant setback for BWI, which is relying heavily on growth in international traffic as its volume of domestic passengers declines. The Dutch airline now offers three nonstop flights each week to Amsterdam but no service out of Dulles.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | January 12, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Transportation Department yesterday gave final approval for Northwest Airlines and KLM Royal Dutch Airlines to integrate their services and operate as a single carrier.An open-skies agreement in September between the United States and the Netherlands gave the carriers of both countries unlimited access to the other's international market.It was the department's second move toward airline internationalization. Last week it approved a proposal by Air Canada and a group of Fort Worth, Texas, businessmen to invest $450 million in Continental Airlines.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | November 20, 1992
KLM Royal Dutch Airlines said yesterday that it is prepared to inject $50 million into Northwest Airlines to help the ailing American carrier's effort to persuade its banks to extend a new credit line of $300 million.Meanwhile, all six of Northwest's unions said they saw a need to grant the carrier concessions of $300 million a year and that they were prepared to begin negotiations.A group of banks led by Bankers Trust is seeking to put together a $300 million loan package, but some banks have been reluctant to go along until other investors make a commitment.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1992
Northwest Airlines, KLM accordNorthwest Airlines and KLM Royal Dutch Airlines signed an agreement aimed at making it easier and more efficient for the two carriers to funnel passengers to each other.Officials for the airlines said yesterday that the agreement eventually would allow both carriers to cover more of the globe with more frequency, helping struggling Northwest gain a stronger foothold in Europe and helping KLM attract more passengers from the United States.Grocery stores, union in talksThe Washington-area local union that represents about 20,000 workers at the Giant Food, Safeway and Super Fresh grocery chains said yesterday that it has requested permission from its parent union to call a strike if negotiations do not produce an agreement.
NEWS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | February 17, 1993
Construction of a long-awaited international terminal at Baltimore-Washington International Airport has been postponed because of the expected loss of a major European carrier and the continued slump in the airline industry.State officials said yesterday that the $120 million terminal would not be built next year as planned, even though the facility was seen as crucial to attracting more international passengers to the underused airport."Basically, we're putting it off," said Secretary of Transportation O. James Lighthizer.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service The Chicago Tribune contributed to this article | November 17, 1992
In a thrust aimed at opening the skies above the United States and Europe to more international competition, the Transportation Department yesterday approved a request by Northwest Airlines and KLM Royal Dutch Airlines to merge and function as one airline and to cooperate in crucial areas such as pricing and strategy.Although the order approving the application was preliminary, and other carriers may file objections in the next 14 days, the agency has rarely reversed itself.If the order takes effect in 21 days, as expected, a foreign and a domestic airline, for the first time, would have the ability to function as one carrier even though legally they would remain separate companies.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1992
GM cancels some new modelsGeneral Motors Corp. is putting the brakes on several new-model projects to conserve cash, according to a published report yesterday.Meanwhile, the automaker is warning local and state governments that up to 21,200 United Auto Workers drawing benefits from an income security fund could be laid off in January.The trade journal Automotive News reported GM has canceled a redesign of its Buick Century and Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera, both assembled in Oklahoma City. The plant will continue to build the existing models of the cars, introduced in 1982 and slightly restyled in 1989.
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