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NEWS
February 7, 1998
A bipartisan, multiracial group of about three dozen legislators met yesterday in the State House to protest plans by the Ku Klux Klan to rally today in Annapolis.At a news conference sponsored by the Legislative Black Caucus, House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. denounced the Klan as a "small band of bigots consumed by hatred."Del. C. Anthony Muse, a caucus member from Prince George's County, said counterdemonstrators should not be provoked by the Klan. "We cannot fight hatred with hatred.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 4, 2013
A few words on the death of Elwin Wilson. He passed last week in a South Carolina hospital at age 76. Wilson had endured heart and lung problems and had suffered a recent bout with the flu. There is little reason you would know his name, but as a young man, Wilson made a virtual career out of hatefulness. He was a Klan supporter who burned crosses, hanged a black doll in a noose, once flung a jack handle at an African-American boy. In 1961, he was among a group of men who attacked a busload of Freedom Riders at a station in Rock Hill, S.C. In none of those things was he unique, so no, his name should ring no bells.
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NEWS
March 10, 1992
The tiny town of Elkton swung a valiant slingshot against the sloth that is the Ku Klux Klan.The Cecil County town recently denied a permit to the Klan to march next month on the same parade route more typically trod by Little Leaguers welcoming Opening Day or Jaycees racing bathtubs to raise charity. The Maryland chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union plans to file suit on behalf of the KKK, claiming that the town's action violates the constitutional guarantee of free speech.It's likely the Klan will win in court.
NEWS
September 18, 2009
W. HORACE CARTER, 88 Newspaper publisher, editor W. Horace Carter, a North Carolina newspaper publisher and editor whose crusades against the Ku Klux Klan in the 1950s earned him a Pulitzer Prize, died Wednesday at New Hanover Regional Medical Center in North Carolina after suffering a heart attack one week ago. Mr. Carter's paper, the Tabor City Tribune, and the nearby Whiteville News Reporter shared the 1953 Pulitzer Prize for meritorious public service...
NEWS
September 10, 1992
OCEAN CITY -- The trial of Ku Klux Klan member Hobert E. Cox, who was charged with battery during a July 4 recruitment rally here, was postponed yesterday because he was in a state prison in Baltimore.Before yesterday's scheduled court date, the 25-year-old Elkton man was imprisoned on charges that he violated terms of his parole, said Danny Mumford, an assistant Worcester County state's attorney.Cox was arrested by Ocean City police and charged with battery and hindering police after he allegedly chased a man he thought had stolen the hood of a Klan member's outfit.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | October 19, 1994
Civil rights leaders in Annapolis are organizing a demonstration to counter a Ku Klux Klan rally scheduled for Oct. 29 at Lawyers Mall in front of the State House.As the Klansmen demonstrate on one side of town, civil rights groups will march down Main Street, then congregate at the First Baptist Church on West Washington Street. The counter-protesters say they will not gather or march near the Klan rally.Klan leaders have predicted that their demonstration could bring about the largest gathering of white supremacists in the city since the 1960s.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | October 21, 1993
The Ku Klux Klan is planning a recruitment rally and cross burning Saturday night in West River in Anne Arundel County, prompting reactions from community leaders ranging from anxiety to disgust."
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | August 29, 1992
The northeastern Maryland town of Elkton must allow the Ku Klux Klan to march there despite fears that such a demonstration could provoke violence, a federal judge ruled in Baltimore yesterday.After a brief hearing, U.S. District Judge Benson E. Legg ordered the Cecil County town to grant the Klan a march permit. He said Elkton had mustered "insufficient evidence that the threat of violence is beyond reasonable control.""Speech cannot be barred or hampered simply because the message is unpopular or offensive," the judge said, echoing a 1988 federal court ruling that allowed another Klan group to march through the Frederick County town of Thurmont.
NEWS
By VINCENT FITZPATRICK and VINCENT FITZPATRICK,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 15, 1996
"The Klan," by Patsy Sims. University Press of Kentucky. 336 pages. $29.95This provocative volume, first published in 1978 and reissued here with updated chapters and a new preface, offers no straightforward history of the Ku Klux Klan. Instead, Patsy Sims takes on, with considerable success, the challenge of "getting at the hearts and minds of its members."Her quest takes her into the foul backwaters of fear and intolerance, of ignorance and envy. Her journey fills her with amazement and loathing.
NEWS
By Ray Jenkins | March 15, 1999
WHEN I first learned of the brouhaha over the recent effort of the Ku Klux Klan to sneak into the "Adopt-a-Road" program in Anne Arundel County, I must confess that I chuckled and fantasized over the comic spectacle of white-sheeted Ku Klux Klansmen picking up trash along the highways in much the same way that stripe-suited chain-gangs used to perform that onerous task along the highways of Dixie not so many years ago.But comedy aside, there are serious issues...
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,Sun reporter | March 26, 2008
City police investigators examined yesterday the computer hard drive used by a white commander accused of ordering a black sergeant to watch online Ku Klux Klan videos, according to three sources familiar with the investigation. Sterling Clifford, a spokesman for the Police Department and the mayor's office, said that the police commissioner briefed Mayor Sheila Dixon on Monday night and yesterday morning on a federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission complaint stemming from the alleged incident, but he declined to comment further on the matter.
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,Sun Reporter | April 15, 2007
HAGERSTOWN-- --Princeton Young attended Hagerstown's segregated schools until he was in the seventh grade and remembers integrating the city's five-and-dime store in the early 1960s. The city didn't have a single African-American police officer or postman when he was growing up, Young recounted, and because he is black, he was not permitted to ride the school bus.
FEATURES
By MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE | August 12, 2006
Long before daytime television was filled with estranged spouses hurling insults in mock courtrooms, pop doctors handing out sex advice and shock shows with topics like "My girlfriend is a transvestite and I didn't even know it!" millions of people tuned into The Mike Douglas Show. There they were entertained by Mike Douglas, an easygoing former big-band crooner who for 90 minutes every weekday deftly mixed song and dance, helpful hints and a surprising dose of current events -- all with a patina of civility that has all but disappeared from television.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | May 2, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A lot of naysayers are picking apart President Bush's choice of conservative TV host and commentator Tony Snow to be his press secretary. Depending on whom you read or hear, Mr. Snow is either too conservative, too anti-Bush, too loyal, too independent, outspoken or maybe just too darn good-looking for the job. But I think Mr. Bush's selection is smart public relations. In this era of relentless news cycles, the press secretary is an administration's most visible day-to-day connection with the public.
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS JR | October 2, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The Ku Klux Klan is a terrorist group. It was organized in 1865 for the purpose of controlling and oppressing newly freed slaves through intimidation, violence and murder. Not many people will argue with that. Historians in particular will find the statement uncontroversial. But 10 years ago in Vicksburg, Miss., I learned an alternate view. Vicksburg was an especially stubborn stronghold of Confederate sentiment during the Civil War - refused to celebrate the Fourth of July again until 1944.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 22, 2005
Exactly 41 years after three young civil rights workers were ambushed and killed, a Mississippi jury convicted a one-time Ku Klux Klan leader yesterday in the notorious case that horrified the country but had never before reached a state courtroom. A jury that one day earlier hinted it might have been deadlocked convicted Edgar Ray Killen of manslaughter in the 1964 deaths of the three men. Jurors could have found Killen guilty of murder - that they did not, relatives of the victims said, showed the difficulty even now in seeking justice for brutal civil rights-era violence.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 19, 1998
A small group of people wearing Ku Klux Klan garb handed out fliers about white racial pride yesterday afternoon at Catherine Avenue and Mountain Road in the Green Haven neighborhood of Pasadena, area residents said.A 17-year-old girl said members of the group wore white hoods and sheets, and she saw them talking with state police officers."The lack of white pride is truly a sad and strange thing, because no group has more right to rightful pride than the white people of the world," the fliers said, according to Michael Arrington, 18, of 225th Street in Pasadena, about five blocks from where the Klan distributed the leaflets.
NEWS
By John Moreno Gonzales and John Moreno Gonzales,NEWSDAY | June 21, 2005
PHILADELPHIA, Miss. - The jury in the murder trial of Edgar Ray Killen told the judge yesterday it was deadlocked after less than three hours, setting the stage for further deliberations on the 41st anniversary of the killings of civil rights workers Michael Schwerner, James Chaney and Andrew Goodman. The jury of nine whites and three blacks deliberated until early evening before announcing to Judge Marcus Gordon that it was deadlocked 6-6 over the murder and manslaughter charges that the 80-year-old former Ku Klux Klan leader and Baptist preacher faces.
NEWS
By John Moreno Gonzales and John Moreno Gonzales,NEWSDAY | June 18, 2005
PHILADELPHIA, Miss. - With her memory fading but her grief focused, the mother of slain civil rights worker Andrew Goodman testified against Edgar Ray Killen yesterday, but neither she nor a collection of witnesses directly implicated the former Ku Klux Klan leader as the mastermind of the Mississippi Burning killings. The first full day of testimony in the case against Killen, 80, included the recollections of a convict, retired Hoover-era FBI men, and a former police chief who said he was unwittingly roped into the Klan by Killen and his followers.
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