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By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2010
A Ugandan health care worker who was affiliated with the Johns Hopkins University was among the more than 70 people killed Sunday night in a terrorist bombing that rocked Kampala. Stephen Okiria, 43, worked as a finance manager for the Center for Communications Programs, a unit of Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health that pushed health marketing initiatives in Uganda under the AFFORD program. Okiria is survived by his wife and six children, ages 3 to 17, according to an e-mail from Bloomberg Dean Michael J. Klag.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2013
Dr. Frederick L. Brancati, an internationally known expert on the epidemiology and prevention of type 2 diabetes who was director of the Division of General Internal Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died Tuesday of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, at his Lutherville home. He was 53. "He was a delightful human being — smart, witty and fun to be around," said Dr. Michael J. Klag, dean of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, whom Dr. Brancati succeeded as division chief.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | April 17, 2013
The dean of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health is among a group of leading scientists that has joined an initiative to eradicate polio. Dr. Michael J. Klag signed a declaration last week endorsing a Polio Eradication Endgame Strategic Plan. It calls for creating a polio-free world by 2018. The initiative is led by Emory University and Aga Khan University. Officials say there is an opportunity to end polio because there are so few cases being reported. More than 400 other scientists from 80 countries signed the declaration, which calls for sustaining containment of the disease once it is eradicated.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | April 17, 2013
The dean of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health is among a group of leading scientists that has joined an initiative to eradicate polio. Dr. Michael J. Klag signed a declaration last week endorsing a Polio Eradication Endgame Strategic Plan. It calls for creating a polio-free world by 2018. The initiative is led by Emory University and Aga Khan University. Officials say there is an opportunity to end polio because there are so few cases being reported. More than 400 other scientists from 80 countries signed the declaration, which calls for sustaining containment of the disease once it is eradicated.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2013
Dr. Frederick L. Brancati, an internationally known expert on the epidemiology and prevention of type 2 diabetes who was director of the Division of General Internal Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died Tuesday of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, at his Lutherville home. He was 53. "He was a delightful human being — smart, witty and fun to be around," said Dr. Michael J. Klag, dean of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, whom Dr. Brancati succeeded as division chief.
NEWS
July 8, 2003
On July 7, 2003 VOLA M. KLAG (nee Elburn), beloved wife of LeRoy H. Klag and devoted mother of Carroll A. Sneed and his wife Stephanie and Brenda Jones and her husband David, grandmother of Jennifer Miller, David Jones, Jr., Vikki Jones, Alexandra Sneed, Kelsey Sneed and the late Carl M. Sneed. Sister Janet Lambert, Ella Elways and her husband Bill and the late Burton Elburn, Jr., William Elburn and Robert Elburn, sister-in-law of Margaret Elburn. Friends are invited to call at the Burgee-Hentz-Seitz Funeral Home, Inc., 3631 Falls Road on Tuesday and Wednesday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Services Thursday at 1 P.M. Interment in Woodlawn Cemetery.
NEWS
August 21, 2006
Wendy Schagen Klag, a volunteer and devoted parent admired for her gentle way with children, died of a seizure disorder Wednesday while on vacation with her family aboard a cruise ship near the Galapagos Islands. She was 54 and lived in Parkville. Wendy Jane Schagen was born in Paterson, N.J., and raised in nearby Glen Rock. She graduated from Juniata College in Huntington, Pa., where she studied sociology and education and met her future husband, Michael J. Klag. The two married in 1975.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2005
Dr. Michael J. Klag, a Johns Hopkins physician and administrator who led the reform of research practices at the medical school, will become the new dean of the university's Bloomberg School of Public Health. Among the first doctors to document and explain the rising problem of kidney disease in America, Klag was chosen from a field of more than 100 candidates to succeed Dr. Alfred Sommer, who will step down in September after 15 years in the position. "It's a wonderful opportunity at a great school with an incredible tradition," said Klag, 52, whose appointment is to be announced today after approval last week by the university trustees' executive committee.
NEWS
February 15, 2006
On February 14, 2006, JANET L. LAMBERT beloved wife of the late Carl L. Lambert and devoted mother of Anthony De Frank and Deborah Jordon, loving grandmother of Pamela, Christy, Becky and Christopher. Also survived by one great-grandchild and sister of Ella Elways and her husband William, sister-in-law of Margaret Elburn and Leroy Klag, dear friend of Jack Davis also survived by many nieces and nephews. Friends are invited to call at the Burgee-Henss-Seitz Funeral Home Inc., 3631 Falls Road on Wednesday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Services will be held at the funeral home on Thursday at 10 A.M. Interment Woodlawn Cemetery.
NEWS
May 2, 2004
On April 29, 2004, JUNE W. HENNEMAN (nee Trotton); loving mother of Roy, David, and Nancy Klag, Kevin and Kimberly Willard; devoted sister of Patricia Carter; loving grandmother of Stephanie, Christopher, Danielle, Dana, Kasey and Rachael; great-grandmother of Karissa and Aiden; dear aunt of Susan, Jennifer and Brandon; The Johns Hopkins Transplant family. Relatives and friends may gather at the MILLER-DIPPEL FUNERAL HOME, INC, 6415 Belair Rd, on Sunday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. A funeral service will be held on Monday at 10 A. M at St. Matthias Episcopal Church, 6400 Belair Road.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2010
A Ugandan health care worker who was affiliated with the Johns Hopkins University was among the more than 70 people killed Sunday night in a terrorist bombing that rocked Kampala. Stephen Okiria, 43, worked as a finance manager for the Center for Communications Programs, a unit of Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health that pushed health marketing initiatives in Uganda under the AFFORD program. Okiria is survived by his wife and six children, ages 3 to 17, according to an e-mail from Bloomberg Dean Michael J. Klag.
NEWS
August 21, 2006
Wendy Schagen Klag, a volunteer and devoted parent admired for her gentle way with children, died of a seizure disorder Wednesday while on vacation with her family aboard a cruise ship near the Galapagos Islands. She was 54 and lived in Parkville. Wendy Jane Schagen was born in Paterson, N.J., and raised in nearby Glen Rock. She graduated from Juniata College in Huntington, Pa., where she studied sociology and education and met her future husband, Michael J. Klag. The two married in 1975.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2005
Dr. Michael J. Klag, a Johns Hopkins physician and administrator who led the reform of research practices at the medical school, will become the new dean of the university's Bloomberg School of Public Health. Among the first doctors to document and explain the rising problem of kidney disease in America, Klag was chosen from a field of more than 100 candidates to succeed Dr. Alfred Sommer, who will step down in September after 15 years in the position. "It's a wonderful opportunity at a great school with an incredible tradition," said Klag, 52, whose appointment is to be announced today after approval last week by the university trustees' executive committee.
NEWS
July 8, 2003
On July 7, 2003 VOLA M. KLAG (nee Elburn), beloved wife of LeRoy H. Klag and devoted mother of Carroll A. Sneed and his wife Stephanie and Brenda Jones and her husband David, grandmother of Jennifer Miller, David Jones, Jr., Vikki Jones, Alexandra Sneed, Kelsey Sneed and the late Carl M. Sneed. Sister Janet Lambert, Ella Elways and her husband Bill and the late Burton Elburn, Jr., William Elburn and Robert Elburn, sister-in-law of Margaret Elburn. Friends are invited to call at the Burgee-Hentz-Seitz Funeral Home, Inc., 3631 Falls Road on Tuesday and Wednesday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Services Thursday at 1 P.M. Interment in Woodlawn Cemetery.
NEWS
By Jane E. Allen and Jane E. Allen,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 8, 2001
Doctors are said to make lousy patients. Now comes a study indicating that many docs avoid being patients altogether. Researchers at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine decided to examine how well doctors took care of their health after previous studies suggested that doctors' bad habits -- among them smoking and drinking -- influence what they tell patients. Using annual health surveys completed by graduates, they found that a surprising number of physicians -- about one in three -- had no regular source of care, even though they had ready access and were better educated and could more easily afford it than the average American.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and David Kohn and Kelly Brewington and David Kohn,Sun reporters | April 23, 2008
For decades, residents of the poor neighborhood surrounding Johns Hopkins Hospital have had an uneasy relationship with the billion-dollar institution at its center. They viewed it as elitist, more interested in medical research than in their care. While the hospital has worked to enhance relations, spending millions on community support and to serve poor patients, recent controversy over a study conducted by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Kennedy Krieger Institute has illuminated historical tensions.
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