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June 18, 1999
THE PROBLEMS facing the peacekeeping troops in Kosovo were not long coming. Foremost are the hordes of Albanian Kosovars going back to destroyed villages and homes, and others still wandering in the hills seeking water and food.Although the Serbian army is withdrawing as agreed, more problems quickly became apparent, with the complaint of Bishop Artemije Radosavljevic that monasteries and churches were under siege in Prizren from Kosovo Liberation Army members patrolling the streets. Serbian Orthodox institutions survived in Kosovo during centuries of Turkish rule.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 3, 1999
PRISTINA, Yugoslavia -- After weeks of complex negotiations, NATO and United Nations officials have agreed to the formation of a civilian emergency force from the remnants of the Kosovo Liberation Army.The army, once a guerrilla force against the Serbs, is being dismantled this month under U.N. supervision. But though its successor, tentatively called the Kosovo Corps, will retain much of its military command structure, the duties of the new force remain a sensitive issue.Though NATO sees the Kosovo Corps as a civilian force, the rebel army's officers inevitably see it as a potential core of a future national army and are selling it to their followers as such.
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NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | May 13, 1999
TIRANA, Albania -- The first shot did not stop him. Neither did the second or the third. But by the 23rd bullet, Agron Berisha was on the ground, awake and waiting to die.Now the 22-year-old soldier is recuperating in the six-room apartment where, for the past eight months, the Kosovo Liberation Army has sent its wounded to heal. Scores of foot soldiers and a few KLA officers have been treated at what they call "the hospital," where most of the medicine is dangerously outdated and the intravenous stands are rusty with age.KLA doctors visit daily, but surgery and other serious medical procedures are performed at the Albanian military hospital on the outskirts of the capital, Tirana.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 15, 1999
PRISTINA, Yugoslavia -- The international peacekeeping force in Kosovo is clamping down hard on the Kosovo Liberation Army, seizing arms caches almost daily and confiscating documents and even cash in what some officials say is a determined effort to break the movement.NATO and United Nations officials maintain that the tougher action is routine, part of an agreement signed almost seven weeks ago that aimed to dismantle the rebel operation within three months.Until now, the NATO-led peacekeeping force has given the guerrillas a fairly wide berth.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 10, 1999
KUKES, Albania -- Thousands of young Kosovo Albanian refugees spoiling to fight are flocking to join the ranks of the KLA. Young men and women, outraged at acts committed against their families in Kosovo and hungry for vengeance, line up daily outside a recruiting center for the Kosovo Liberation Army in northern Albania, near the border with Kosovo. Sprinkled among the would-be enlistees are ethnic Albanians who had been working abroad and have returned to join the fray. Graffiti on the walls of this refugee-packed town illustrate the prevailing feelings of Kosovars and Albanians: "KLA -- Kukes Is With You."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 25, 1999
The senior commanders of the Kosovo Liberation Army carried out assassinations, arrests and purges within their ranks to thwart potential rivals, say current and former commanders in the rebel army and some Western diplomats.The campaign, in which as many as a half-dozen top rebel commanders were shot dead, was directed by Hashim Thaci and two of his lieutenants, Azem Syla and Xhavit Haliti, the officials said. Thaci denied through a spokesman that he had been responsible for killings.Although the United States has long been wary of the KLA, the rebel group has become the main ethnic Albanian power in Kosovo.
NEWS
By BILL GLAUBER and BILL GLAUBER,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 1, 1999
KUKES, Albania -- Like other refugees, they creep through craggy mountains and traffic-clogged roads seeking shelter from a stormy war. Yet whether wearing jeans and leather jackets, or clean camouflage uniforms and sturdy boots, there is no mistaking the veterans of the Kosovo Liberation Army.The ethnic Albanian rebels may be nearly beaten, but they haven't disappeared.The guerrilla force is hanging by a thread after the Serbs responded to NATO's bombing of Yugoslavia with an onslaught against Kosovo's ethnic Albanians.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 10, 1999
PODUJEVO, Yugoslavia -- Inside a snow-covered farmhouse set deep in Kosovo's countryside, the rebel commander known as Remi watches television, waits for orders and prepares for the springtime killing season.Negotiations have begun in France to end Kosovo's conflict, but Remi and the Kosovo Liberation Army are steeling themselves for the thaw. They follow the talks and are hopeful they will succeed, on their terms. In case they don't, the ethnic Albanians care for their weapons, holding fast to their aim of Kosovo's independence from Serbia.
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | August 3, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The executive branch of the federal government took a one-day holiday this past week in the Balkans.The president was in Bosnia, repeating his mantra, "We must win the peace." Secretary of State Madeleine Albright was in Kosovo, asking the Kosovo Liberation Army to be nice.The KLA, unfortunately, is not nice by nature. "Peace" in Kosovo, as KLA members are enforcing it, means taking over the public buildings and whatever private businesses have survived, stealing whatever spoils of war they can get their hands on and daring NATO to try to stop them.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 22, 1999
PRISTINA, Yugoslavia -- A faint semblance of normal life has taken hold in parts of Kosovo, if life can be considered normal when thousands of NATO soldiers are patrolling the streets and highways in light and heavy armor.Couples stroll the main boulevard here, while British soldiers ride by in open-hatched vehicles, pointing their automatic weapons at apartment house balconies as they pass.Kosovo Liberation Army soldiers have taken off their uniforms and put away their guns -- but not so far out of reach that they couldn't retrieve them in a hurry.
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | August 3, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The executive branch of the federal government took a one-day holiday this past week in the Balkans.The president was in Bosnia, repeating his mantra, "We must win the peace." Secretary of State Madeleine Albright was in Kosovo, asking the Kosovo Liberation Army to be nice.The KLA, unfortunately, is not nice by nature. "Peace" in Kosovo, as KLA members are enforcing it, means taking over the public buildings and whatever private businesses have survived, stealing whatever spoils of war they can get their hands on and daring NATO to try to stop them.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 25, 1999
The senior commanders of the Kosovo Liberation Army carried out assassinations, arrests and purges within their ranks to thwart potential rivals, say current and former commanders in the rebel army and some Western diplomats.The campaign, in which as many as a half-dozen top rebel commanders were shot dead, was directed by Hashim Thaci and two of his lieutenants, Azem Syla and Xhavit Haliti, the officials said. Thaci denied through a spokesman that he had been responsible for killings.Although the United States has long been wary of the KLA, the rebel group has become the main ethnic Albanian power in Kosovo.
NEWS
June 22, 1999
THE peacekeeping operation in Kosovo began well. The agreement wrung out of the Kosovo Liberation Army removes the fear that it might turn on NATO forces. The agreement with Russia brings it on-board for a unified Kosovo where ethnic Albanians and Serbs will live in peace.Most of the harsh criticisms of Clinton administration policy are being proven untrue within days of their utterance. Meanwhile, the atrocities committed by Serbian authorities against ethnic Albanians that are being discovered exceed the predictions and vindicate the NATO bombing that made Serbia stop.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 22, 1999
PRISTINA, Yugoslavia -- A faint semblance of normal life has taken hold in parts of Kosovo, if life can be considered normal when thousands of NATO soldiers are patrolling the streets and highways in light and heavy armor.Couples stroll the main boulevard here, while British soldiers ride by in open-hatched vehicles, pointing their automatic weapons at apartment house balconies as they pass.Kosovo Liberation Army soldiers have taken off their uniforms and put away their guns -- but not so far out of reach that they couldn't retrieve them in a hurry.
NEWS
June 18, 1999
THE PROBLEMS facing the peacekeeping troops in Kosovo were not long coming. Foremost are the hordes of Albanian Kosovars going back to destroyed villages and homes, and others still wandering in the hills seeking water and food.Although the Serbian army is withdrawing as agreed, more problems quickly became apparent, with the complaint of Bishop Artemije Radosavljevic that monasteries and churches were under siege in Prizren from Kosovo Liberation Army members patrolling the streets. Serbian Orthodox institutions survived in Kosovo during centuries of Turkish rule.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 17, 1999
PRISTINA, Yugoslavia -- The British Parachute Regiment doesn't have to look too far for problems in this town. They come right to the front gate of C Company, First Battalion headquarters.Yesterday, Lindita Obrtinca, a returning Kosovar Albanian refugee, drove her red Yugo to the curb of the former school turned headquarters, hopped out, and pleaded with a soldier: "I opened the door, I found in my home rockets. There are too many rockets in my home."Within minutes, a six-member patrol was walking up a hill in one of Pristina's worst neighborhoods, ready to pounce on Obrtinca's house, which had been taken over by a Serbian paramilitary during the war.They passed Serbs packing belongings and preparing to flee Kosovo.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 16, 1998
MALISEVO, Yugoslavia -- It's one thing to take a battlefield beating. It's another to have the enemy move into your home and refuse to leave.But that's the fate of Skender Krasniqi, a Kosovo Liberation Army leader in the Drenica region. While he sleeps in a friend's basement, his foes, Serbian security police, live inside his brick home. There's a machine gun nest on a balcony, sardine cans in the living room and a slogan on the outside: "You're Wasting Your Time Waiting for Kosovo."Like hundreds of thousands of others, Krasniqi can't go home, even though the diplomats are claiming it will soon be safe to return.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 29, 1999
NEW YORK -- Ose Lajqi sat in the Gurra Cafi in the Bronx, unable to eat or drink, still haunted by the phone call he made to his little brother in Kosovo just hours earlier."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 17, 1999
VERMITCA, Yugoslavia -- In the first big wave of a reverse exodus of refugees who were driven from Kosovo in a Serbian campaign of terror, more than 12,000 cheering, stunned Albanians began the journey home yesterday.Their exodus created the kind of chaos for refugee agencies that aid workers had feared.By midafternoon, the line of honking, overloaded cars, trucks and tractors climbing the crumbling road out of Albania toward this Kosovo border village was 5 miles long. The trip by car from Kukes, the rutted Albanian town 15 miles down the mountain where 120,000 refugees have made their temporary homes, was at one point taking 4 1/2 hours.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Jonathan Weisman and Mark Matthews and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 15, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright and Secretary of Defense William S. Cohen will meet with top Russian officials in Helsinki, Finland, this week to try to end an embarrassing standoff between NATO and Russian troops at the Pristina airport in Kosovo.Four days after 200 Russian troops stunned the West by moving into Kosovo without an agreement with NATO, their presence in what was supposed to be the alliance headquarters in Pristina continued to preoccupy the highest levels of government in Washington and Moscow.
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