Advertisement
HomeCollectionsKite
IN THE NEWS

Kite

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 23, 2006
On July 21, 2006, ELIZABETH L. KITE; beloved wife of the late David F. Kite, Jr.; loving mother of Laura Katherine Gick, Jeffrey David Kite and Susan Jane Ritmiller. Also survived by seven grandchildren; devoted sister of Rozene Collier. Family will receive friends Sunday, 3 to 5 and 7 to 9pm at HARRY H. WITZKE'S FAMILY FUNERAL HOME, INC., 4112 Old Columbia Pike, Ellicott City where a service will be held Monday, 10am. Interment Crestlawn Memorial Gardens. Contributions may me made to the: Boumi Temple Transportation Fund, P.O. Box 9695, 5050 King Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21233.
ARTICLES BY DATE
EXPLORE
June 27, 2012
I would like to thank everyone involved in the first Catonsville Kite Flying Contest, held at Charlestown retirement community May 19. This intergenerational event brought together our residents with families and students from Arbutus, Hillcrest and Lansdowne Elementary schools, along with Our Lady of Victory School, on a bright sun-splashed morning. In particular, much appreciation is extended to Charlestown resident and Rotarian Pat Kasuda for her vision and leadership in creating the contest.
Advertisement
SPORTS
July 21, 1992
HOUSTON-- The Houston Rockets have canceled their NBA trade agreement with the Orlando Magic for center Greg Kite, saying the team did not want to risk future complications from heart problem Kite had last year.The deal would have given the Magic two future second-round draft choices for the 6-foot-11, 250-pound Kite.Rockets general manager Steve Patterson said yesterday that Kite, a nine-year NBA veteran who developed atrial fibrillation early last season, had failed to pass a team physical.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2010
The earthquake robbed Huguens Jean and Clifford Muse of the ability to fulfill a final promise to their grandfather. Fly to Haiti, he told the brothers as cancer ate away his health, and carry my coffin, garbed in white. The color meant something. The old man wanted them to find joy, even in the sadness that accompanies death. But the Jan. 12 earthquake that killed 230,000 and leveled Port-au-Prince made it impossible for Jean and Muse, both students at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, to return for their grandfather's funeral a month after the disaster.
FEATURES
March 22, 1992
Colorful kites will soar in the skies over Washington on Saturday, as kite fanciers from near and far gather on the grounds west of the Washington Monument for the 26th annual Smithsonian Kite Festival.Co-sponsored by the Smithsonian Resident Associate Program and the National Air and Space Museum, the event is a traditional part of the festivities during Cherry Blossom time in the nation's capital. The rain date is the following day.A festival highlight is the hand-made kite competition, in which kites are judged on appearance, design, craftsmanship, beauty and performance.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Writer | June 2, 1994
POTOMAC -- Finding room on their schedules for the Kemper Open often has been a troublesome task for the biggest names on the PGA Tour, especially since the now-$1.3 million event moved to Avenel seven years ago.Whether it was coming to the Tournament Players Club course a year before it was ready -- when it could have been called The Unkempt Open -- or being squeezed in between more prestigious tournaments on the calendar, the Kemper Open seemed to lack star appeal.Until this year.Even though the course is still a bit spotty after being ravaged by ice storms last winter, and that a date two weeks before the U.S. Open is still no bargain, the Kemper Open has perhaps its strongest field since leaving nearby Congressional.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | June 1, 1994
POTOMAC -- One of the first things a golf instructor says to you when you take up the game is "Relax." He then should add, "and if you want to see how it's done, watch Tom Kite."The all-time leading PGA Tour money-winner moved in on Avenel, site of this week's Kemper Open, yesterday and began his preparation. Relaxed to the point of yawning a few times, yes, but at the same time looking like a surgeon going through scrub down prior to an operation.You would think at age 44 and with 22 years on tour and 19 wins, including the U.S. Open, under his belt, plus nearly $9 million in career earnings, Tom may be at the stage where he would be easing off. Pig's-eye.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1999
Go fly a kite! This time, that's not a put-down.The Friends of St. John's are sponsoring the Great Kite Fly this weekend as a way to help the community get to know "that liberal arts school" where students study for oral debates and don't get grades.If there's sunshine and a breeze over College Creek that's not too strong Saturday, expect to see hundreds of visitors trampling the greens at St. John's College, sending up their favorite flying devices."It's so that more people will come to St. John's and see the great things going on there," said event chairwoman Esther Slaff.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer | May 24, 1993
POTOMAC -- By the time Tom Kite reached the eighth tee at Avenel yesterday, his one-shot lead over Grant Waite going into the final round of the $1.3 million Kemper Open had turned into a one-shot deficit.As he strolled down the fairway after hitting his drive, Kite spotted one of his best friends, Caves Valley pro Dennis Satyshur. He walked over to Satyshur wearing a playful grin."This isn't exactly the script that you would have written," Kite said. "It's even better."In the end, Kite couldn't quite finish the story the way he planned.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | June 23, 1992
They're old school chums, a profound friendship forged via the shared experiences of endeavoring together to qualify for the Professional Golfers' Association Tour. Tom Kite made it; Dennis Satyshur didn't.Kite reached the ultimate, winning more money than any man in the history of the game and now has gained possession of the 1992 U.S. Open championship.Satyshur, to be sure, isn't exactly a woeful washout. He pursued golf, too, but headed in another direction and became one of the country's most renowned club professionals -- proficient as a player, a respected teacher and adept administrator.
NEWS
By Brent Jones, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2010
As a federal judge sentenced a Maryland businessman Friday to three years in prison for defrauding two banks of millions of dollars, calling the sentence a substantial penalty levied on a man who previously never had so much as a speeding ticket. U.S. District Judge Benson E. Legg's sentence for Brian I. Satisky, 56, followed federal sentencing guidelines. Satisky could have received up to 51 months in prison for his role in writing bad checks to Carrollton Bank and Baltimore County Savings Bank, falsely inflating his account balances in a scheme known as check kiting.
TRAVEL
By Baltimore Sun reporter | March 12, 2010
Where: Washington, 15th Street and Independence Avenue, on the grounds of the Washington Monument. When: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. March 27 (rain date is March 28). What: The 44th annual event, organized by the Smithsonian Associates and the National Air and Space Museum, celebrates the art and craft of kite making. The festival features handmade-kite contests for children and adults, activity tents, demonstrations, kite fliers from around the world and kite displays. How much: Free.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | February 22, 2010
A Maryland businessman pleaded guilty Monday in federal court to a financial scheme that defrauded two Baltimore banks out of millions, ruined his check-cashing company and contributed to his older brother's suicide. Brian I. Satisky, 56, faces up to 30 years in prison at his sentencing and a $1 million fine for his role, which involved writing bad checks to various banks to falsely inflate the account balances. Prosecutors also plan to ask that he pay restitution to the banks he defrauded: $1.8 million to Carrollton Bank and $10.6 million to Baltimore County Savings Bank.
NEWS
April 7, 2008
Police Foundation honors county officers The Baltimore County Police Foundation honored several county police officers last week at its 28th annual awards dinner. Award recipients were: Officer Jennifer C. Lasek, community service; Officer Paul M. Ciepiela, crime prevention; Officer William R. Ayres III, distinguished contribution to the profession; Officer David G. Roesler and his police dog, Ben, exceptional performance; and Officers Timothy S. Bird, Michael L. Piccolo, Jason H. Zahn, Christine L. Bayne, Jameson T. Feelemyer and Christopher C. Wingerd, valor.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | December 21, 2007
The Kite Runner lives in the galvanic performances of two young Afghan actors, Zekeria Ebrahimi and Ahmad Khan Mahmidzada. They bring home the torment of Afghan life before and after the Taliban and, just as important, the resilience of children everywhere. With their help, director Marc Forster and screenwriter David Benioff's adaptation of Khaled Hosseini's beloved best-seller does a sensitive, potent job of depicting the ups and awful downs of an asymmetrical friendship. The Kite Runner (Paramount Classics)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | October 20, 2007
Paul Hines, who was known as the "Buffalo Man" because of a bison herd he kept on his Churchville farm, died of cancer Oct. 13 at his residence. He was 77. Born in Omaha, Neb., and raised in Alliance, he served in the Army during the Korean War and retired after 20 years as a Signal Corps photo officer and instructor. He moved to Maryland in 1968 and worked part-time as a postal carrier in Bel Air and a clerk in Churchville. Family members said Mr. Hines raised bison for 25 years on the 60-acre Cedarvale Farm, which had been in his wife's family since the mid-1860s.
NEWS
By Larry Bingham and Larry Bingham,Sun Staff | March 28, 2004
There is a difference between people who fly kites regularly and those who go out once or twice a year. You can tell them apart by the lengths they go to get their kites in the air. Some run around like chickens with their heads cut off. And some don't. You want to get tips from those who don't. "Two people can launch a kite easily with the wind blowing at your back," said Dr. Adam Grow, a Silver Spring veterinarian who is president of the Maryland Kite Society. The two should stand about 50 feet apart.
TRAVEL
June 3, 2007
WHAT'S NEW Beach shuttle service Crossing Ocean Highway with kids and coolers in tow just got a little easier in Ocean City. Beachgoers can now turn to e-cruzers, an east-west shuttle service that will ferry vacationers from the bayside to the beach and back. The open-air vehicles have professional drivers, can carry six passengers plus gear and are powered by rechargeable batteries. "We're not adding to traffic congestion or pollution; we're reducing it by giving people a safe and convenient way to get to the beach," says Russell G. Rankin, founder and president of e-cruzers, who ran a test trial of the shuttle last summer.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | April 1, 2007
Allen Ault swooshed a multicolored stunt kite back and forth against a blue sky while Paul Hines stood about 100 yards away holding a black baseball cap in his outstretched hand. Using his thumbs, Ault made the bat-shaped kite twirl and swirl in the gusts above Rockfield Park in Bel Air. Slowly, he lowered the tip of the kite into his friend's cap. Then, with a quick jerk, the kite soared upward again. "My kites just need the touch of the master," Ault said with a chuckle. "They know when I am on the other end of the string."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.