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Kitchen Table

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By Julia Reed | November 18, 2013
Want to know what's for dinner at the Ulman, Robey and Rouse households? With the help of a new cookbook by the Howard County Historical Society, you can replicate recipes from County Executive Ken Ulman, State Sen. James Robey and Columbia's developer, the late James Rouse. Through its 50th-anniversary edition, “Let's Dish! Then and Now Recipe Collection,” the historical society aims to capture a combination of Howard County's historic and modern cuisine. According to Shelley Wygant, the key organizer of the cookbook, “Let's Dish!
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Joshua Cain felt miserable as his Engine 58 crew gathered in the kitchen of their Annapolis Road firehouse after a brutal blaze that ripped through several rowhouses and took hours to control. Only two months into the job as a Baltimore firefighter, he had found a dog that looked just like his childhood Belgian shepherd-poodle badly burned and not moving inside one of the ravaged homes. Cain and his colleagues sat around the kitchen table, telling stories of their own dogs. The camaraderie made him feel "like part of the team," Cain said.
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FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | September 15, 1991
An American institution is under attack. It is the kitchen table.Everybody knows that most of the world's great ideas -- the theory of light, the theory of making potato salad without mayonnaise, the theory of who will win the pennant -- take shape during conversations around the kitchen table.Yet whenever I visit a modern kitchen and look around for place to sit down and chew the fat, I don't find a table.What I find is a breakfast bar, or a kitchen "island" surrounded by stools. While it is possible to position yourself on such perches, they don't encourage serious sitting.
NEWS
By Julia Reed | November 18, 2013
Want to know what's for dinner at the Ulman, Robey and Rouse households? With the help of a new cookbook by the Howard County Historical Society, you can replicate recipes from County Executive Ken Ulman, State Sen. James Robey and Columbia's developer, the late James Rouse. Through its 50th-anniversary edition, “Let's Dish! Then and Now Recipe Collection,” the historical society aims to capture a combination of Howard County's historic and modern cuisine. According to Shelley Wygant, the key organizer of the cookbook, “Let's Dish!
NEWS
By KATHY LALLY and KATHY LALLY,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 2, 1999
MOSCOW -- While Igor and Tatyana Myshkin were taking off their boots and putting on their hosts' slippers, the family was clearing the supper dishes from the kitchen table, making way for the operation.The family's two children went into a bedroom and turned their music up loud. They said they didn't want to hear the cat's screams.There was only one scream. It came from Tatyana. A moment before the little gray cat succumbed to the anesthetic, terror descended and she tried desperately to escape, badly clawing Tatyana, who had been gently holding and stroking her.An hour later, the cat had been spayed and the Myshkins were packing up their instruments, heading for their next appointment.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2012
Most people will say that no matter how big the home, or how many levels and rooms inside, family and guests always seem to gather in the kitchen. Amy Askew, who has lived with her husband and children in their very large, Craftsman-style version of a Dutch Colonial in Roland Park, certainly agrees. "This is where everything happens - where we prepare the food, where we eat almost all of our meals and where we have the really important conversations," she said, sitting at the 8-foot-long by 3-foot-deep kitchen table with an old barn door for a top. "I can see out the back deck and see the tree line, and the dogs are always at our feet.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | May 25, 2008
It's not just because he's getting married today or because he's the funniest outdoors writer in Seattle ... OK, in the country. Even if those things weren't true, Ron Judd's new paperback, The Blue Tarp Bible, ($12.95, The Mountaineers Books) is the definitive volume on the things you can do with the "fabric that binds America." In one thin volume, a reader can learn how to make a matching redneck area rug (to go with redneck drapes), an emergency weekend kite and a man purse. Judd also solves the problem many of us face - "So let's say you've got a hindquarter of a large moose laying on the kitchen table" - with this blue tarp solution: "Industrial-strength zipless freezer bag."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2001
A drug raid by city police has resulted in the arrests of three men who investigators said were filling vials with suspected cocaine as officers burst into their Southwest Baltimore apartment. A loaded .44 caliber Desert Eagle handgun found on a kitchen table has been linked to three homicides, said Lt. Michael Tabor, commander of the department's drug enforcement unit. Police would not comment further on the killings or the gun - one of two seized Wednesday from the apartment in the 200 block of Atholgate Lane - saying it might compromise their investigation.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | October 1, 1990
ONE DAY WHEN I was about 8, I underwent some sort of psychotic episode and climbed atop the kitchen table to do a little tap-dancing.My father, who was perfectly sane at the time, spotted me before too long and went ballistic.Apparently he had this thing about kids tap-dancing on the kitchen table. You could do a lot of neat things in my house -- my sister once kept a raccoon in the hall closet until she (the raccoon) chewed through part of the door and my mother said that was enough of that nonsense.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | September 11, 1997
This time around, let's relax and enjoy Tom Miller's painted furniture, currently on view at Steven Scott Gallery.Since about a decade ago, when the work of this Baltimore artist began to find an audience first locally and then on a national scale, it's been scrutinized, analyzed, solemnized quite enough.And all because it's so much fun. The old furniture that Miller finds and paints in his trademark Technicolor style has an immediate appeal that people tend to resist. Afraid somebody will think they're calling it superficial, they emphasize instead its serious side.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2012
Most people will say that no matter how big the home, or how many levels and rooms inside, family and guests always seem to gather in the kitchen. Amy Askew, who has lived with her husband and children in their very large, Craftsman-style version of a Dutch Colonial in Roland Park, certainly agrees. "This is where everything happens - where we prepare the food, where we eat almost all of our meals and where we have the really important conversations," she said, sitting at the 8-foot-long by 3-foot-deep kitchen table with an old barn door for a top. "I can see out the back deck and see the tree line, and the dogs are always at our feet.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2012
Lenny Moore and Lydell Mitchell were two of Penn State's greatest players, and not surprisingly, became two of the greatest Baltimore Colts. Two weeks ago they drove to State College, Pa., to pay their respects to Joe Paterno, who died Sunday and who they give much of the credit for their success on and off the field. "When you say Penn State, you say Joe Paterno," said Moore, the Colts' Hall of Fame running back. Moore played for the Nittany Lions in the mid-1950s, when Paterno was assistant to head coach Rip Engle.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2011
Many people imagine having a little bungalow by the beach. In 2005, Kurt and Gail Zanelotti were lucky enough to make that dream a reality. In what may possibly be one of the smallest houses in Fenwick Island, Del., the couple's thinking on their home is summed up in the words of a little plaque hanging on a wall of their enclosed front porch: "It is What It Is. " Kurt Zanelotti, 53, the owner of a commercial and residential floor-covering business,...
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | September 2, 2010
We bought our house almost 30 years ago, but even then the real estate agent was selling us on the big kitchen — relatively speaking. The dining room and the living room were no bigger than sandboxes, but she made the point that families never spend much time in those formal rooms anyway. So the builder had devoted most of the first-floor space to the kitchen, with room for a table and chairs, a highchair and a toddler's playthings. All these years later, the kitchen — the heart of the home, I think — has officially morphed into an entertainment area, where friends and family gather while the cook cooks.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,melissa.harris@baltsun.com | July 20, 2009
Thomas cannot read or write. He lives with his mother in a two-story house in Hamilton, purchased with rolled change and savings from working as a groundskeeper at the Johns Hopkins University. He has longed to escape Baltimore and buy a ranch house in the country with a fenced yard and a room large enough for a pool table. Now, Thomas, 43, knows he'll never get that - because two people he trusted stole his entire life savings. Two weeks ago, Joseph L. Moody, a groundskeeper who worked with Thomas for a decade, and Moody's girlfriend Janet Gilmore pleaded guilty to stealing more than $150,000 from Thomas.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Susan.Reimer@baltsun.com | June 15, 2009
I was sitting on an examining table, waiting to meet the new doctor my insurance company had assigned me to, when she blew in the door, offered her hand and shook mine energetically. Then the new doc sat down on a chair in the corner of the room, put her feet up on the seat of another chair and clasped her hands behind her head like somebody who planned to be there for a while. "Tell me about your life," she said, and suddenly a routine physical became a cross between a job interview and a high school reunion.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Staff Writer | September 25, 1992
Current polls showing Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton well ahead of President Bush fail to take the kitchen table factor into account, according to Texas Republican Sen. Phil Gramm.So far, he said, Americans are avoiding the decision that must be made on Nov. 3, Election Day. Though unhappy with the economy under Mr. Bush, voters are not drawn to the alternative, Clinton. So, they delay the family confabs where hopes and concerns and fears about the contenders are weighed and reconciled."They haven't gone to the kitchen table yet," the senator said.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | September 2, 2010
We bought our house almost 30 years ago, but even then the real estate agent was selling us on the big kitchen — relatively speaking. The dining room and the living room were no bigger than sandboxes, but she made the point that families never spend much time in those formal rooms anyway. So the builder had devoted most of the first-floor space to the kitchen, with room for a table and chairs, a highchair and a toddler's playthings. All these years later, the kitchen — the heart of the home, I think — has officially morphed into an entertainment area, where friends and family gather while the cook cooks.
NEWS
By Sonya Michel | October 16, 2008
Shelly Mandell, president of the Los Angeles chapter of the National Organization for Women, introduced Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin at a rally recently by saying - in an echo of Gloria Steinem a generation ago - "This is what a feminist looks like." As a women's historian, I would have to disagree. Mrs. Palin, despite her membership in the organization Feminists for Life, is not really a feminist. She is, rather, a "maternalist"- a woman who accepts the gendered division of labor but uses her assignment to home and family to claim the right to public participation.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Gus G. Sentementes | July 17, 2008
A Park Heights man shot and killed a 45-year old man who was attempting to burglarize his aunt's home early yesterday morning, a police spokeswoman said. Police did not release the name of the man who was killed because next of kin had not been notified. They also did not release the name of the shooter yesterday. Several people at the man's house yesterday declined to speak with a reporter. Police received a call reporting a shooting at the 3800 block of Hayward Ave. about 1:10 a.m. yesterday, said police spokeswoman Nicole Monroe.
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