Advertisement
HomeCollectionsKitchen Garden
IN THE NEWS

Kitchen Garden

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick | March 13, 2013
Evergreen Museum & Library is bringing back "Edible Evergreen," its five-part kitchen garden series with chef John Shields of Gertrude's. The course, which follows three seasons of sustainably growing and preparing fresh organic produce, includes gardening workshops with Gertrude's master gardener Jon Carroll, four cooking demonstrations with Shields, an optional chef's tour of Baltimore's 32nd Street Farmers' Market and a fall harvest luncheon at...
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Every time baby squash in my garden starts to grow, it dies. I hose down the garden every day, but it still gets fuzzy and dries up. How can I stop this? Most vegetables don't like wet foliage. Choanephora wet rot is a fungus encouraged by warm, rainy days with overcast, humid conditions. Overhead watering, watering too often, and plants crowding so they don't get good air circulation all contribute to choanephora. The fuzzy black or brown fungal growth occurs in squash and pumpkin blossoms, causing them to abort, or causing them to wither at the connection of the blossoms to the young fruit.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1996
It's only mid-April, and Susie Russell's spring and summer dinners are still asleep.Here and there you can see traces: cut-back stems of annual herbs, neatly raked beds where lettuce seeds have been sown, tiny green sprouts where other early lettuce has been planted.But the asparagus hasn't begun to poke out its green shoots, and the tepees for the snow peas aren't in place. Everything is resting in its bed of soil.Never mind. When Mrs. Russell looks at her kitchen garden, she sees gazpacho and mesclun salads.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick | March 13, 2013
Evergreen Museum & Library is bringing back "Edible Evergreen," its five-part kitchen garden series with chef John Shields of Gertrude's. The course, which follows three seasons of sustainably growing and preparing fresh organic produce, includes gardening workshops with Gertrude's master gardener Jon Carroll, four cooking demonstrations with Shields, an optional chef's tour of Baltimore's 32nd Street Farmers' Market and a fall harvest luncheon at...
FEATURES
By JeanMarie Brownson and JeanMarie Brownson,Chicago Tribune | June 21, 1995
Home-grown vegetables, fruits and herbs remain one of life's true pleasures.Sylvia Thompson, a California-based garden writer, has spent more than seven years working on "The Kitchen Garden Cookbook" and its companion book "The Kitchen Garden" (Bantam, $27.95 each).Ms. Thompson, who lives on a mountain in Idyllwild in Southern California, uses everything edible, from the wrapper leaves of large cabbages, cauliflower and brussels sprouts to the bolted flowers of broccoli and the tender shoots of peas.
NEWS
By NANCY TAYLOR ROBSON and NANCY TAYLOR ROBSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 6, 2005
The garden is just about finished, but you're not ready to be finished with the garden. So bring it indoors. Dig up peppers and herbs for a potted kitchen garden. (Choose younger, smaller plants and prune flowers of things like basil to keep them going longer). Haul in your potted annuals. Lots of summer annuals can survive - and when tended, thrive - for months indoors. Or, you can make a whole new inside garden. "I make a composition inside a Wardian Box [decorative glass case] with things like maidenhair fern, an orchid and begonia, the fancy-leafed kind that doesn't go dormant," says Muffin Evander, owner of Cultivated Designs, a container design firm in Baltimore, who specializes in potted gardens.
FEATURES
By Mia Amato and Mia Amato,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | June 1, 1997
Few flowers give such good return as lavender. The edible flowers, which look and smell beautiful in bloom, can be cooked into intriguing desserts and main dishes. The plant itself, be it green or gray, has an evergreen mounding shape suitable for formal or country-style gardens.In the American vegetable garden, lavender should be included for the simple fact that its early summer flower spikes attract bumblebees, the primary pollinizers for tomato plants. When the lavender flowers are over, the bumblebees stick around to help turn little yellow tomato blossoms into beefy red tomatoes.
TRAVEL
By KATHY VAN MULLEKOM and KATHY VAN MULLEKOM,DAILY PRESS | March 26, 2006
COLONIAL WILLIAMSBURG, Va. -- There are 100 gardens covering 301 acres in Colonial Williamsburg: everything from the kitchen garden at the James Geddy House to the sheared hollies and hedges at the Governor's Palace. Maintaining those gardens keeps 50 volunteers and 50 full-time gardeners clipping, digging and raking. That labor force needs bushels of money for plants, tools and payroll. Donors recently gave gifts of $200,000 to $2 million to ensure five gardens get what they need to thrive.
NEWS
By MARTY ROSS and MARTY ROSS,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | August 13, 2006
Ellen Ogden didn't want to look out her living-room windows at a bare stretch of lawn, so she designed the prettiest garden she could think of: a vegetable garden. Ogden is co-founder of The Cook's Garden (cooksgarden.com), a mail-order business specializing in salad greens. Her catalog and garden offer much more than just lettuce; she has strawberries, flowers and lots of fresh herbs. A neat garden, planted with straight rows of vegetables, is a thing of beauty, Ogden says, but for her own home in Manchester, Vt., she wanted something fancier.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Every time baby squash in my garden starts to grow, it dies. I hose down the garden every day, but it still gets fuzzy and dries up. How can I stop this? Most vegetables don't like wet foliage. Choanephora wet rot is a fungus encouraged by warm, rainy days with overcast, humid conditions. Overhead watering, watering too often, and plants crowding so they don't get good air circulation all contribute to choanephora. The fuzzy black or brown fungal growth occurs in squash and pumpkin blossoms, causing them to abort, or causing them to wither at the connection of the blossoms to the young fruit.
TRAVEL
By Kate Parham, For The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2012
We were lucky; our drive into St. Michaels was, somehow, sans traffic, despite the fact that it was Friday evening and we surely were not alone in our desire to escape the city for a relaxing getaway on the Eastern Shore. As we drove through the downtown, stopping to let families cross the street for a dinner cracking shellfish at the Crab Claw, we looked for the turnoff for the Inn at Perry Cabin, our destination for the weekend. Beneath an umbrella of large linden trees lining the driveway, we eagerly anticipated seeing the results of the inn's four-month, $2.7 million renovation.
NEWS
By MARTY ROSS and MARTY ROSS,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | August 13, 2006
Ellen Ogden didn't want to look out her living-room windows at a bare stretch of lawn, so she designed the prettiest garden she could think of: a vegetable garden. Ogden is co-founder of The Cook's Garden (cooksgarden.com), a mail-order business specializing in salad greens. Her catalog and garden offer much more than just lettuce; she has strawberries, flowers and lots of fresh herbs. A neat garden, planted with straight rows of vegetables, is a thing of beauty, Ogden says, but for her own home in Manchester, Vt., she wanted something fancier.
TRAVEL
By KATHY VAN MULLEKOM and KATHY VAN MULLEKOM,DAILY PRESS | March 26, 2006
COLONIAL WILLIAMSBURG, Va. -- There are 100 gardens covering 301 acres in Colonial Williamsburg: everything from the kitchen garden at the James Geddy House to the sheared hollies and hedges at the Governor's Palace. Maintaining those gardens keeps 50 volunteers and 50 full-time gardeners clipping, digging and raking. That labor force needs bushels of money for plants, tools and payroll. Donors recently gave gifts of $200,000 to $2 million to ensure five gardens get what they need to thrive.
NEWS
By NANCY TAYLOR ROBSON and NANCY TAYLOR ROBSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 6, 2005
The garden is just about finished, but you're not ready to be finished with the garden. So bring it indoors. Dig up peppers and herbs for a potted kitchen garden. (Choose younger, smaller plants and prune flowers of things like basil to keep them going longer). Haul in your potted annuals. Lots of summer annuals can survive - and when tended, thrive - for months indoors. Or, you can make a whole new inside garden. "I make a composition inside a Wardian Box [decorative glass case] with things like maidenhair fern, an orchid and begonia, the fancy-leafed kind that doesn't go dormant," says Muffin Evander, owner of Cultivated Designs, a container design firm in Baltimore, who specializes in potted gardens.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | April 13, 2003
THERE IS A bromide, often attributed to Julia Child, that good cooks can't be good gardeners and good gardeners can't be good cooks. Even if the great chef did not say it, it makes sense. Both tasks require so much time, energy and study - not to mention trial and error - that a person would need two lifetimes to be good at both. "I do know that once I get out in the garden, it is hard to stop," says cookbook author Ellen Ecker Ogden. "And once I get inside, I am pretty tired. The last thing I want to do is stand at the stove and cook."
NEWS
By Carol Stocker and By Carol Stocker,THE BOSTON GLOBE | February 2, 2003
Little pots of culinary herbs on a kitchen windowsill will yield fresh flavors over a long period and cheer the home with their useful greenery. Chives, thyme, bay, sage, winter savory and mint top the list of perennial kitchen herbs for an indoor garden. Windowsills are cold, and light levels are low this time of year, so it's easier to buy already-growing herbs from local garden centers and supermarkets than try to start them from seed. The more light they get, the happier your herbs will be, so place them in a south-facing window if possible.
FEATURES
By Mia Amato and Mia Amato,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | August 4, 1996
Some kitchen gardeners have only pots to grow in, yet manage container crops fruitful enough to be admired by those with acres of backyard space. Even if you're lucky enough to have a big plot to grow vegetables, there's good reason to have plants in pots in your kitchen garden.Certain herbs do best in pots: The true French tarragon must be wintered indoors, and sprightly spearmint spreads invasively if its roots are not confined. Lemon grass, essential to Thai cuisine, needs a pot because it is invasive and frost-tender.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | April 13, 2003
THERE IS A bromide, often attributed to Julia Child, that good cooks can't be good gardeners and good gardeners can't be good cooks. Even if the great chef did not say it, it makes sense. Both tasks require so much time, energy and study - not to mention trial and error - that a person would need two lifetimes to be good at both. "I do know that once I get out in the garden, it is hard to stop," says cookbook author Ellen Ecker Ogden. "And once I get inside, I am pretty tired. The last thing I want to do is stand at the stove and cook."
FEATURES
By Mia Amato and Mia Amato,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | June 1, 1997
Few flowers give such good return as lavender. The edible flowers, which look and smell beautiful in bloom, can be cooked into intriguing desserts and main dishes. The plant itself, be it green or gray, has an evergreen mounding shape suitable for formal or country-style gardens.In the American vegetable garden, lavender should be included for the simple fact that its early summer flower spikes attract bumblebees, the primary pollinizers for tomato plants. When the lavender flowers are over, the bumblebees stick around to help turn little yellow tomato blossoms into beefy red tomatoes.
FEATURES
By Mia Amato and Mia Amato,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | August 4, 1996
Some kitchen gardeners have only pots to grow in, yet manage container crops fruitful enough to be admired by those with acres of backyard space. Even if you're lucky enough to have a big plot to grow vegetables, there's good reason to have plants in pots in your kitchen garden.Certain herbs do best in pots: The true French tarragon must be wintered indoors, and sprightly spearmint spreads invasively if its roots are not confined. Lemon grass, essential to Thai cuisine, needs a pot because it is invasive and frost-tender.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.