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By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2010
Anne Arundel County residents can get a free "vial of life" kit, a container designed to hold emergency medical and contact information, starting Friday at county fire stations. Fire Chief John Robert Ray said residents should complete the form in the 3-inch "lifesaving information for emergency" vial and place the vial in the refrigerator, which protects it from fire. A refrigerator sticker will alert emergency workers that there is a vial inside. The vial can be especially useful for people who are elderly, disabled or live alone, he said.
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NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
While the Obama administration presses colleges and universities to respond more aggressively to sexual assaults, students who are attacked at Baltimore-area schools are unable to get rape kit exams on their campuses. Instead, they must go to a hospital off-campus - an extra step that advocates for victims say deters at least some from reporting the crime. The question whether schools should offer the exams is the subject of a national debate that is dividing school administrators, nurse examiners and advocates - with victims falling on both sides.
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NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
While the Obama administration presses colleges and universities to respond more aggressively to sexual assaults, students who are attacked at Baltimore-area schools are unable to get rape kit exams on their campuses. Instead, they must go to a hospital off-campus - an extra step that advocates for victims say deters at least some from reporting the crime. The question whether schools should offer the exams is the subject of a national debate that is dividing school administrators, nurse examiners and advocates - with victims falling on both sides.
NEWS
By Brandi Bottalico, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
Earl Johnson and his neighbors were more serious about emergency preparedness after they experienced a power outage and no running water at the same time a few years ago, he said. "We had elderly people who needed water," he said. "We went to the community association first but they weren't open yet, then we went to a church. " That experience inspired Johnson, now on the Office of Sustainability's Commission on Sustainability, and he taught Baltimore residents how to find and use their resources at a free event hosted by the Baltimore Office of Sustainability Tuesday.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
Earth Starter is having the sort of year startups dream of. The company, founded by University of Maryland graduates, sells a kit designed to make gardening easy in small spaces. You lay the 4-by-6-foot mat on your plot of dirt, push the provided seed balls through the mat's holes and water them with the included drip irrigation system. Since Jan. 1: •The mats came to market — for sale online, up to $80. •The company won first place, and $52,500, at a national business competition held at the University of Maryland.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | October 3, 2001
Item: Chicken of the Sea Tuna Salad Kit What you get: 4 servings Cost: About $3 Nutritional content: Mayonnaise & Onion flavor - 30 calories, 24 grams fat, 4 grams saturated fat, 490 milligrams sodium, 7 grams carbohydrate, 2 grams sugars Preparation time: Mix and chill Review: If your tuna salad is always tempting, you probably don't need Chicken of the Sea's new tuna-salad kit. But these kits are a lifesaver if you're tuna- or time- impaired....
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
It wasn't the average traffic stop on the Baltimore Beltway Tuesday morning. Maryland state troopers noticed a man playing a drum kit on the shoulder of the Interstate 695 inner loop, between Windsor Mill Road and Security Boulevard, around 10:30 a.m., a spokeswoman said. He told state police he had run out of gas and decided to set up and practice until assistance arrived. A State Highway Administration truck stopped and helped him refill his tank The drummer was not cited and continued on his way, she said.
NEWS
January 30, 2000
The American Lung Association of Maryland is offering two "do-it-yourself" home radon-testing kits to Maryland homeowners. A short-term kit sells for $12 plus tax and a long-term kit sells for $22. With the short-term kit, homeowners test their indoor air with a sampler for four to seven days, then mail the materials for laboratory analysis. The long-term kit provides the opportunity to test indoor air for three months to a year, allowing for a more accurate reading. Kits may be purchased by check, Visa or MasterCard.
NEWS
February 4, 1991
Frederick Kit Adams Sr., a Baltimore physician for nearly half-century, died Tuesday at the Meridian Multi-Medical Nursing Home in Towson after a lengthy illness. He was 88.Services for Dr. Adams were being held today at St. James Episcopal Church, 829 N. Arlington Ave.Born in Hearne, Texas, Dr. Adams graduated from Howard University in Washington and then attended Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tenn.Following medical school, he came to Baltimore's old Provident Hospital for his internship.
FEATURES
By Jason Chow and Jason Chow,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 2, 2008
TORONTO - Inside a converted warehouse in a desolate area just east of downtown, Abigail Breslin sits patiently with her mother, waiting for the film cameras to set their positions for the next take. The young actress, like the rest of the cast, sticks out here because of her Depression-era costumes. In fact, with her chin-length hair and a 1930s-style blue dress, white socks and shoes, she is so carefully put together that she almost resembles an antique figurine. Breslin is playing the title character in Kit Kittredge: An American Girl, the family-friendly movie opening today that is based on the hugely popular line of dolls and books from American Girl.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
Earth Starter is having the sort of year startups dream of. The company, founded by University of Maryland graduates, sells a kit designed to make gardening easy in small spaces. You lay the 4-by-6-foot mat on your plot of dirt, push the provided seed balls through the mat's holes and water them with the included drip irrigation system. Since Jan. 1: •The mats came to market — for sale online, up to $80. •The company won first place, and $52,500, at a national business competition held at the University of Maryland.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
It wasn't the average traffic stop on the Baltimore Beltway Tuesday morning. Maryland state troopers noticed a man playing a drum kit on the shoulder of the Interstate 695 inner loop, between Windsor Mill Road and Security Boulevard, around 10:30 a.m., a spokeswoman said. He told state police he had run out of gas and decided to set up and practice until assistance arrived. A State Highway Administration truck stopped and helped him refill his tank The drummer was not cited and continued on his way, she said.
EXPLORE
April 29, 2013
Little Leapers was unveiled to an excited crowd of children and caregivers along with program sponsors and library staff on March 27 at the Bel Air library. More than 80 people were in attendance, including 30 children, to see the new kits and have the opportunity to participate in several experiments put on by local scientists. Little Leapers is Harford County Public Library's newest early literacy initiative which consists of pre- and early-literacy kits that focus on fostering and developing pre- and early literacy skills through STEM (science, technology, engineering and math)
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | April 18, 2013
Fewer moms scheduled early deliveries when hospitals used a tool kit to promote full-term pregnancies, according to a research funded by the March of Dimes and others. Researchers looked at deliveries at 25 hospitals who used the tool kit and found that C-sections performed with no medical reason and inductions of labor fell 83 percent. The March of Dimes called the results promising. They said babies born before full-term are at increased risk for serious health problems.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2013
These days, libraries offer much more than books. Most people know they can check out videos, music, video games, books on tape and toys. But in the Harford County Public Library system, patrons can also check out educational kits, filled with games, toys, suggested activities and sometimes even costumes. The library has been offering kits in one form or another for decades, said Melissa Harrah, the system's Learning and Sharing Collection librarian. The first ones, still in circulation, were created to help children go through scary experiences or life transitions, such as getting a new sister or brother, or having surgery.
FEATURES
March 14, 2013
My neighbor told me she has an emergency first-aid kit for her dog, with things like bandages, aspirin, and Benadryl inside. I'd like to make my own for my pet. What things should I have on hand for illnesses or injuries to tide us over until we could get to a veterinarian? I commend you and your neighbor for taking steps to prepare for the unexpected. As you mentioned these supplies do not take the place of a veterinary evaluation or treatment but are meant as an aid until you can get to a veterinarian.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2001
If necessity is the mother of invention, then pumice stone is one of its humbler children. A porous form of lava, it is used in solid and powdered form as an abrasive. Any East Baltimore housewife could have told you that once upon a time, if she looked up from her Saturday morning scrubbing of the elegant marble steps leading to her modest, two-story rowhouse. But as those housewives expired, or moved to the county, such domestic expertise also vanished. Few folks remembered that it took pumice and rubbing powder and warm water to clean white marble.
NEWS
By Mary Knudson and Mary Knudson,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 5, 1991
ROCKVILLE -- A small company hoping to market a do-it-yourself Pap test kit to detect cervical cancer saw its hopes dashed yesterday by a panel of the Food and Drug Administration, although panelists applauded the applicant's goal of reaching disadvantaged women.The Obstetrics-Gynecology Devices Panel voted 4-2 to recommend FDA disapproval of a plastic tubular device called My-Pap, which drew controversial testimony from the lay public and the medical profession.Panelists said that Medtech Inc. of Bohemia, N.Y., did not prove that its test would be used by the target group of women and also questioned whether the results would give users a false sense of security.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Zach Sparks | January 24, 2013
After a season of blood-curdling thrills set in the 1960s, we've come full circle to modern times. Now we can all sleep easy for a few months. Unlike the Season 1 finale where viewers were left on a cliffhanger, the show's writers tied this season up with a nice little bow (and no, killer Santa Lee Emerson won't be delivering this present). There is one person in the giving spirit however, and it's not Lana Winters (unless you count death as a gift). By the time the self-obsessed journalist arrives at Briarcliff to film her expose, Sister Jude has already been released from the asylum under the care of Kit. It takes time for Jude to detox and not chase Kit's children around the house with a broom while making threats, but eventually Jude regains her sanity and teaches the kids various dances and how to sew. I never took Jude for the Mary Poppins type, but she finds happiness caring for the children in the Walker household.
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