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By Jennifer Vick and Anne Haddad and Jennifer Vick and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | May 6, 1997
The pretzels hung from a white gazebo on Main Street, with an Amish woman ready to hand one out with a cool glass of lemonade.But the refreshments and much of East Main Street were off-limits yesterday as a crew filmed a comedy, "For Richer or Poorer," starring Tim Allen and Kirstie Alley as a wealthy Manhattan couple who hide out among the Amish in Lancaster County when they fear the Internal Revenue Service is on their trail.A Carroll County farm and Westminster's Main Street stand in for Lancaster County, Pa. The storefronts were altered: Giulianova Italian grocery and deli became "The Tulip Basket Gift Shoppe," and the Winchester Exchange building was "Lancaster Exchange."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts | October 16, 2012
Oh boy. Tonight's the night we get Paula Abdul as a guest judge. She always annoyed me on American Idol - will I find her less tiresome here? I don't doubt her credibility, she's arguably more a dancer than a singer. During the staircase introductions: Val gets introduced by his full first name of "Valentin. " I wonder if he asked for that or if Tom's having fun. Brooke tells us lifts will be allowed tonight - get ready to meet the harsh reality that is gravity during rehearsals.
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1997
When a couple starts off a film yelling at each other, you just know they're going to reconcile in the end. The only question is, how?For Brad and Caroline Sexton, the New York high rollers whose decline and rebound are at the heart of "For Richer or Poorer," the answer is simple.As in, get simple. As in, lighten up. As in, spend some time among the Amish and see how much you're missing the little things.Watching as a warring couple realize how much they love each other has been a movie comedy staple since at least "It Happened One Night."
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | October 16, 2007
WHAT DID the 11 members of the jury in the Princess Diana inquest learn from their trip to Paris and visit to the Alma tunnel? They stayed inside for 15 minutes looking at the gouged-out notorious 13th pillar, which still has chunks of concrete missing and shows the steel rods underneath. That's where Diana's Mercedes hit. They also walked farther up the tunnel and looked back to the entrance, seeing the famous "black spot" as the road curves into the tunnel. This may have contributed to chauffeur Henri Paul losing control of the limousine.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2005
"Last year I did a movie, and when I saw it, I went, 'Oh my God, oh my God, oh my God.' Now it can't really be camouflaged. Now it's not even a matter of wearing the right clothes. That's when I said, 'Uh oh.'" -- Kirstie Alley, star of the reality-comedy series Fat Actress.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 2, 2006
Television's newest genre may be the celebrity-abuse sitcom. Kirstie Alley was the first to mock herself in her own show. Then Farrah Fawcett did it. And now Tori Spelling is doing it, too. With each new show, in which B-list celebrities grasp at stardom by making fun of themselves on camera, the amount of humiliation heaped upon them grows. SO NOTORIOUS / / makes its premiere at 10 tonight on VH1.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | May 6, 1991
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* Births are busting out all over as season-ending plot lines this spring.Last week on NBC's "Cheers," for example, Sam and Rebecca (Ted Danson and Kirstie Alley) decided to make a baby together. And on ABC's "Life Goes On" last night, Libby (Patti Lupone) added another Thatcher to the cast.Tonight on CBS' "Evening Shade" (at 8, Channel 11), Ava (Marilu Henner) finishes what she began last week at a banquet -- namely labor -- and much of the cast is in attendance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,Sun Staff Writer | April 28, 1995
Now, children. Be nice. Don't impale anyone with a broom today.A fat lot of good it would do to scold the kids in "Village of the Damned," John Carpenter's remake of the 1960 sci-fi flick. In their platinum-blond wigs, gray outfits and bad attitudes, they make the Hitler Youth look cuddly.This down-with-people story began with a John Wyndham novel called "The Midwich Cuckoos," so named for the cuckoo, which lays its eggs in other birds' nests. Carpenter, who also remade "The Thing," has updated the 1957 book and 1960 movie to the '90s, but sometimes it's hard to tell.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 23, 1999
"Fargo" did Minnesota better than "Drop Dead Gorgeous" does.The HBO movie "The Positively True Adventures of the Alleged Texas Cheerleader-Murdering Mom" did Mom Wars better. "Pink Flamingos" did trailer parks better."Waiting for Guffman" did small towns with more wit."Election" satirized high school competition with more intelligence.And Michael Ritchie sent up the world of beauty pageants with more hilarity in 1975 with "Smile."So what does "Drop Dead Gorgeous," Michael Patrick Jann's comedy about two Minnesota mothers warring over a small-town high school beauty pageant, bring to the table?
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | June 23, 1993
Think you're way cool?Take a number. According to Entertainment Weekly's current "What is Cool" issue, you're behind David Letterman (there's news); a dead man (cult film director Ed Wood); the assembly-required furniture at Ikea and "Today" anchor Katie Couric (doesn't she belong in the "So uncool, they're cool" column?).The June 25 issue of the weekly magazine identifies cool people, places and things that have "the power to swing the thermostat of popular culture."Yes, but what is cool?
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 2, 2006
Television's newest genre may be the celebrity-abuse sitcom. Kirstie Alley was the first to mock herself in her own show. Then Farrah Fawcett did it. And now Tori Spelling is doing it, too. With each new show, in which B-list celebrities grasp at stardom by making fun of themselves on camera, the amount of humiliation heaped upon them grows. SO NOTORIOUS / / makes its premiere at 10 tonight on VH1.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | March 10, 2005
BOSTON - You have to admit that a show named Fat Actress is a headline writer's dream. The Showtime docu-comedy that premiered Monday was heralded with enough puns to fill the all-you-can-eat buffet at the copy desk. There were the headlines announcing that Kirstie Alley "throws her weight around," and that "girth turns to mirth," and that the show was "worth the weight," and you get the idea. The idea being that Ms. Alley, former babe of Cheers fame, was going to take on and send up Hollywood, the land where being a fat actress is an oxymoron.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2005
"Last year I did a movie, and when I saw it, I went, 'Oh my God, oh my God, oh my God.' Now it can't really be camouflaged. Now it's not even a matter of wearing the right clothes. That's when I said, 'Uh oh.'" -- Kirstie Alley, star of the reality-comedy series Fat Actress.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynn Smith and Lynn Smith,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 6, 2005
About a year ago, comic actress Kirstie Alley spent five days in bed, thinking. The hiatus she'd taken to spend more time with her children had lasted too long, she thought. Her phone wasn't ringing so much. She missed acting as if it were oxygen. Cheers, the Look Who's Talking movies, the People's Choice awards and her last sitcom, Veronica's Closet, were old news. She had gained 60 or 70 pounds. She was 53 years old. She had come face to face with "the void," something women in Hollywood have complained about since the first screen actress passed 40. But face-in-the-pillow victimhood felt to her like "a pretty creepy position."
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | November 11, 2001
A MEMORABLE PLACE At home, the Amish way By Randall S. Carlson Special To The Sun Several years ago, I worked in a film (For Richer or Poorer, starring Tim Allen and Kirstie Alley) portraying an Amish man from a Pennsylvania Amish community. While being fitted for the clothes I had to wear for the film, I was struck by how comfortable they were and how surprisingly familiar and natural it felt to wear them. By the end of the filming, I was compelled to buy an Amish straw hat to remember the experience, and even more compelled to encounter a genuine Amish community.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 23, 1999
"Fargo" did Minnesota better than "Drop Dead Gorgeous" does.The HBO movie "The Positively True Adventures of the Alleged Texas Cheerleader-Murdering Mom" did Mom Wars better. "Pink Flamingos" did trailer parks better."Waiting for Guffman" did small towns with more wit."Election" satirized high school competition with more intelligence.And Michael Ritchie sent up the world of beauty pageants with more hilarity in 1975 with "Smile."So what does "Drop Dead Gorgeous," Michael Patrick Jann's comedy about two Minnesota mothers warring over a small-town high school beauty pageant, bring to the table?
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | November 6, 1993
A week or so back, Newsweek had an interesting cover story postulating that the inner lives of dogs were actually quite intense, fraught with love and hate and lust and betrayal. But clearly the makers of "Look Who's Talking Now!" hadn't seen it: they manage to make their dogs as dreary as . . . John Travolta.This third progeny of one of the genuine fluke hits of the '80s, moves the voice-over comedy stylings out of the mouths of babes -- who are now old enough to talk for themselves, though not very interestingly -- and into the mouths of dogs.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | October 29, 1990
KIRSTIE ALLEY should make it from television to the big screen as long as she sticks to comedy. She's very good at it. She is particularly good at in ''Sibling Rivalry,'' a new comedy that was directed by Carl Reiner.Reiner, who didn't do too well with his last few films, is back on top with this one. It's funny throughout. Some of us might have preferred a different ending, but the ending Reiner does use is certainly good enough.Alley plays a neglected wife, married eight years to a doctor who pays her little mind.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 2, 1998
Maybe it's the appearance of a gun in the first act that tells you "Deconstructing Harry" is going to be a little bit edgier than your typical Woody Allen film. Or maybe it's Allen's jarring use of jump cuts during the movie's first moments. Or his experimentation with shifting time periods and realities. Or the script, which is among the most angrily vulgar of Allen's career.In any event, none of these departures adds up to much in the way of substance. For all its bite, "Deconstructing Harry" is a disappointment, providing an unsettling portrait of an artist whose gaze remains monotonously self-absorbed, even when it's fixed on a dizzying ensemble of characters.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1997
When a couple starts off a film yelling at each other, you just know they're going to reconcile in the end. The only question is, how?For Brad and Caroline Sexton, the New York high rollers whose decline and rebound are at the heart of "For Richer or Poorer," the answer is simple.As in, get simple. As in, lighten up. As in, spend some time among the Amish and see how much you're missing the little things.Watching as a warring couple realize how much they love each other has been a movie comedy staple since at least "It Happened One Night."
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