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By Ned Parker and Ned Parker,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 14, 2008
BAGHDAD -- Several Shiite and Sunni political factions united yesterday to pressure the Kurds over control of oil and the future of the city of Kirkuk, which Kurdistan wishes to annex to its self-ruling region in the north. The budding front, which include one-time enemies such as Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr and former Prime Minister Ayad Allawi's secular faction, says the country should have a strong central government. In contrast, the Kurds and the Supreme Islamic Iraqi Council, a major Shiite party, have championed a federal system that would give a limited role for the national government and greater powers to the regions.
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NEWS
July 3, 2009
In the Persian Gulf with the inaugural NFL-USO Coaches Tour, Ravens coach John Harbaugh (left) meets Army Spc. Joshua Hewitt of Baltimore on Thursday at Forward Operating Base Warrior near Kirkuk, Iraq. Below, U.S. military personnel laugh and take photographs during remarks by the NFL contingent at the Al Faw palace in Baghdad.
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NEWS
By Aamer Madhani and Aamer Madhani,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 7, 2004
KIRKUK, Iraq - The grousing of a young member of the Iraqi Turkmen Front over prices at a Kurd-owned grocery last week nearly triggered an ethnically charged street fight on Kirkuk's main drag. The shopkeeper snapped back with an ethnic slur, and the Turkmen Front member retreated across the street to ITF headquarters to retrieve his Kalashnikov, according to Iraqi police and witnesses. He then climbed to the building's balcony and reportedly fired two rounds in the general direction of the shop.
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Tina Susman,Los Angeles Times | December 12, 2008
BAGHDAD - The Abdullah Restaurant was the kind of place Iraqis took their families on special occasions. It was the kind of place high-ranking officials in the northern city of Kirkuk chose for power lunches, where they dug into plates on tables covered with white cloth as water burbled from a decorative fountain. Yesterday, as families celebrated the Eid al-Adha holiday and Arab and Kurdish leaders talked reconciliation in the crowded dining room, it was the kind of place a suicide bomber decided was the perfect target.
NEWS
By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Molly Hennessy-Fiske,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 17, 2007
BAGHDAD -- Three bombs killed at least 76 people in the oil-rich northern city of Kirkuk yesterday, police said, the city's worst attack in recent memory. Ethnic tensions have been building in Kirkuk, a city with a mixed population of Turkmen, Sunni and Shiite Arabs, and Kurds as it approaches a referendum required by the Iraqi constitution on its future. No one claimed responsibility for the bombings. But some residents and observers said they think they were the work of militants linked to al-Qaida who are attempting to sabotage the political process by bringing sectarian tensions to a boil.
NEWS
By Caesar Ahmed and Ned Parker and Caesar Ahmed and Ned Parker,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 29, 2008
BAGHDAD - Female bombers killed at least 57 people and wounded 280 in three attacks yesterday on Shiite pilgrims marching in Baghdad and a fourth on a Kurdish demonstration in Kirkuk. Twenty-five people were killed in Kirkuk and 178 wounded when a woman blew herself up, police and medical sources said. At least 32 people died and 102 were wounded in Baghdad in attacks by three female bombers. The bloodshed shattered a period that had seen a four-year low in Iraq violence. The decrease in attacks had prompted senior U.S. officials in Iraq to describe Sunni militants as a spent force no longer capable of toppling Iraq's Shiite-led government.
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Tina Susman,Los Angeles Times | December 12, 2008
BAGHDAD - The Abdullah Restaurant was the kind of place Iraqis took their families on special occasions. It was the kind of place high-ranking officials in the northern city of Kirkuk chose for power lunches, where they dug into plates on tables covered with white cloth as water burbled from a decorative fountain. Yesterday, as families celebrated the Eid al-Adha holiday and Arab and Kurdish leaders talked reconciliation in the crowded dining room, it was the kind of place a suicide bomber decided was the perfect target.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 3, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Bomb blasts severely damaged a bridge linking a highway from Baghdad with the northern city of Kirkuk yesterday, the police and witnesses said, heightening tensions between Arabs and Kurds and forcing traffic to detour through some of the most dangerous areas of Diyala province. An American tank firing at insurgents near Fallujah also killed three Iraqi children yesterday, according to a military statement, and an American helicopter was damaged by gunfire north of Baghdad and forced to land.
NEWS
By Maggie Farley and Ned Parker and Maggie Farley and Ned Parker,Los Angeles Times | August 11, 2007
BAGHDAD -- A car bomb killed 11 people yesterday in a Kurdish district of the Iraqi city of Kirkuk, police said, and a U.S. military helicopter was forced to make an emergency landing south of Baghdad. Meanwhile, the Security Council voted unanimously yesterday to expand the United Nations' presence in Iraq to help tackle political, economic and humanitarian problems that have eluded the U.S., British and Iraqi governments. The resolution directs the U.N. to help reconcile rival factions and to mediate territorial disputes, such as in the northern Kurdish territory, where there is a pending referendum on the future of oil-rich Kirkuk.
NEWS
By C.J. Williams and C.J. Williams,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 18, 2003
KIRKUK, Iraq - Midway through the U.S. commanding general's proclamation of peace and brotherhood here yesterday, gunfire erupted outside the heavily fortified government compound where he was addressing town leaders. "Get back! Get back!" U.S. soldiers shouted at hundreds of Iraqi civilians, mostly Kurds, gathered between coils of concertina wire to plead for jobs or help getting back homes and land taken away during Saddam Hussein's rule. In a frantic attempt to escape the gunfire behind them, the crowd had pushed forward, prompting U.S. sentries to fire machine-gun salvos in warning.
NEWS
By Ned Parker and Said Rifai and Ned Parker and Said Rifai,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 7, 2008
BAGHDAD - The Iraqi parliament broke for summer vacation yesterday without passing a law that would have allowed provincial elections to be held this year, dealing a blow to hopes for bringing alienated Sunni and Shiite voices into the political process any time soon. The parliament, which tried during a four-day special session to pass the legislation under pressure from the United States and United Nations, could not resolve differences over Kirkuk, an oil-rich mixed area that the Kurds wish to annex to their semiautonomous northern region.
NEWS
By Ned Parker and Saif Hameed and Ned Parker and Saif Hameed,Los Angeles Times | August 2, 2008
BAGHDAD - Three Iraqi soldiers were killed in a roadside bombing yesterday in Iraq's northern city of Kirkuk, where relations remained frayed among Arabs, Kurds and Turkmen after a suicide bombing and ethnic clashes earlier in the week. The bomb targeted a convoy of Iraqi army vehicles, killing three soldiers and wounding two others, the military said. Iraq's government warned local factions that it would not allow any party to decide unilaterally the region's future, in reaction to a threat by Kurdish provincial council members to declare Kirkuk a part of Iraqi Kurdistan.
NEWS
By Caesar Ahmed and Ned Parker and Caesar Ahmed and Ned Parker,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 29, 2008
BAGHDAD - Female bombers killed at least 57 people and wounded 280 in three attacks yesterday on Shiite pilgrims marching in Baghdad and a fourth on a Kurdish demonstration in Kirkuk. Twenty-five people were killed in Kirkuk and 178 wounded when a woman blew herself up, police and medical sources said. At least 32 people died and 102 were wounded in Baghdad in attacks by three female bombers. The bloodshed shattered a period that had seen a four-year low in Iraq violence. The decrease in attacks had prompted senior U.S. officials in Iraq to describe Sunni militants as a spent force no longer capable of toppling Iraq's Shiite-led government.
NEWS
By Ned Parker and Ned Parker,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 14, 2008
BAGHDAD -- Several Shiite and Sunni political factions united yesterday to pressure the Kurds over control of oil and the future of the city of Kirkuk, which Kurdistan wishes to annex to its self-ruling region in the north. The budding front, which include one-time enemies such as Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr and former Prime Minister Ayad Allawi's secular faction, says the country should have a strong central government. In contrast, the Kurds and the Supreme Islamic Iraqi Council, a major Shiite party, have championed a federal system that would give a limited role for the national government and greater powers to the regions.
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Asso Ahmed and Tina Susman and Asso Ahmed,Los Angeles Times | December 27, 2007
BAGHDAD -- Kurdish lawmakers agreed yesterday to a six-month delay in a referendum on whether the oil-rich city of Kirkuk should join the semiautonomous region of Kurdistan or remain under Iraqi central government control. The delay had been expected because of problems in arranging logistics for the vote, which was supposed to have been held by the end of the year. A census to determine who would be eligible to vote, for instance, has not yet been done. But by putting off the issue, the lawmakers highlighted what has become a constant in Iraq: the inability of leaders to settle disputes whose resolution are considered key to ending ethnic and sectarian strife.
NEWS
By Jane Ciabattari | November 4, 2007
Refresh, Refresh By Benjamin Percy Graywolf Press / 250 pages / $15 paper Benjamin Percy proved he is a remarkable storyteller with his first collection, The Language of Elk. He breaks new ground with Refresh, Refresh, which includes half a dozen short stories that are among the first to measure the human repercussions in the ongoing narrative of the Iraq war. Since the American-led invasion of Iraq in March 2003, journalists have had the time to...
NEWS
By Louise Roug and Louise Roug,Los Angeles Times | February 18, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice made a surprise visit to Baghdad yesterday and urged Shiite, Sunni and Kurdish politicians to use a lull in violence resulting from a new security plan to reach long-delayed agreement on key political issues. Her visit came as the much-vaunted plan, dubbed "Enforcing the Law," gets under way in Iraq's capital. An Iraqi military spokesman said attacks had already dropped significantly and that many fewer bodies were being brought to the morgue.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 28, 2003
BANI MAQAN, Iraq - The first crack in Saddam Hussein's formidable northern defense line appeared here yesterday at this Iraqi checkpoint on the main highway into Kirkuk, a city rich in oil and strained by ethnic tensions. This post, formerly bristling with soldiers and Iraqi border guards who exacted bribes from travelers passing through the demilitarized zone, was unexpectedly abandoned yesterday afternoon by Iraqi soldiers. The soldiers had defended it since 1991. They left quietly, loading onto trucks and slipping quickly away.
NEWS
By Maggie Farley and Ned Parker and Maggie Farley and Ned Parker,Los Angeles Times | August 11, 2007
BAGHDAD -- A car bomb killed 11 people yesterday in a Kurdish district of the Iraqi city of Kirkuk, police said, and a U.S. military helicopter was forced to make an emergency landing south of Baghdad. Meanwhile, the Security Council voted unanimously yesterday to expand the United Nations' presence in Iraq to help tackle political, economic and humanitarian problems that have eluded the U.S., British and Iraqi governments. The resolution directs the U.N. to help reconcile rival factions and to mediate territorial disputes, such as in the northern Kurdish territory, where there is a pending referendum on the future of oil-rich Kirkuk.
NEWS
By Tina Susman | July 18, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- The political bloc loyal to the Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr announced yesterday that it had decided to resume participation in the Iraqi parliament. Also, U.S. and Iraqi officials announced a ban on truck traffic into Kirkuk and proposed digging a trench around the northern city, where a series of bombs killed at least 76 people a day earlier. The idea of encircling the city with a trench underscored fears that the violence in Baghdad and neighboring Diyala province will overtake the once-peaceful north as increased U.S. troop levels drive insurgents from the capital.
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