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NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | December 3, 1991
BOTH pedestrians and drivers these days face the risk of getting clobbered by somebody running a traffic light. There aren't enough police officers in the world to cover every intersection in a city like Baltimore, and light-running is a practice that has become frighteningly common in this frightening age.That was not the case in Baltimore through the 1940s and into the early 1950s -- at least at major downtown intersections. There were police kiosks in the middle of those intersections, and if you ran through an officer's personally operated red light, it was you who got clobbered -- by a lecture and a ticket.
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NEWS
May 8, 2014
Regarding an editorial that appeared in The Aegis, while we at the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration appreciate the interest in promoting the MVA's "Anywhere, Anytime" online campaign, the editorial mischaracterizes the recent policies enacted to shorten wait times at our branch offices ( "Too young to get served at the MVA?" April 22). Over the past several years, the MVA has been working to transform the perception of the agency; we want customers to think first of online services and of visiting an MVA branch only if necessary.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Sun Staff Writer | April 11, 1995
Construction workers lowered Baltimore's newest style of community policing into place yesterday at Market Center: an 8-by-12-foot corner kiosk based on a Japanese model of law enforcement.In a few weeks, this blue box at the northwest corner of West Lexington and North Howard streets will be a new police substation known as a "koban," complete with phones, a fax, a computer, television monitors and a bathroom.Now, it is an empty steel shell with bulletproof glass, but the $125,000 structure is being lauded by police and business leaders as a step toward revitalizing the Howard Street corridor.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
Cell-phone recycling kiosks will be banned and stores that buy small electronics will be regulated like pawn shops under legislation passed Tuesday by the Baltimore County Council. The pair of bills, introduced last month by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, is meant to stem the theft of cell phones, which police say is a growing problem in the county. Both measures passed unanimously in a 6-0 vote, with one member absent. Robberies in the county have increased in recent years, with more than 350 cell phones stolen last year, police say. County police believe the potential for instant cash available at the recycling machines "was a driving force behind many of these crimes," Chief Jim Johnson said after the meeting.
NEWS
By Jennifer Vick and Jennifer Vick,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | March 16, 1997
Information about Medicare is available to county senior citizens through an interactive touch-the-screen kiosk in the lobby of the Westminster Senior Center.The free service is on loan from the Trailblazer Health Enterprises Inc., a Hunt Valley company hired to run state Medicare programs. The kiosk will remain at the Westminster Senior Center for three to six months."We felt it was a great opportunity to put it [the kiosk] here at the Carroll County center," said Susan Cronin, coordinator for the Carroll County Senior Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program.
FEATURES
September 10, 1991
A kiosk selling individual and discounted packaged tickets to city museums and attractions opens today in the Inner Harbor. Operated by the Baltimore City Life Museums, the kiosk is next to the Visitors Information Booth on the west shore of the Inner Harbor Promenade.The participating museums are B&O Railroad Museum, Babe Ruth Birthplace & Baseball Center, Baltimore City Life Museums, Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore Museum of Industry, Cloisters Children's Museums, Evergreen House, Great Blacks in Wax Museum, Homewood Museum, Lacrosse Hall of Fame Museum, Maryland Historical Society, Mount Clare Mansion, National Museum of Ceramic Art, The Baltimore Zoo and the Walters Art Gallery.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1997
Visitors to Baltimore's Fells Point neighborhood could soon be greeted by city police officers stationed at a Japanese-inspired kiosk in Broadway Square.Maj. Timothy J. Longo, commander of the Southeastern District, said the police substation would help officers monitor streets they cannot always patrol.Known as a "koban," the structure would be modeled after the community policing centers that have been successful in Tokyo and replicated in downtown Baltimore."The kiosk would help us establish a permanent police presence in Fells Point," Longo said.
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 16, 2003
SEATTLE - Coffee is serious business anyplace where, for months at a stretch, the sun rises long after the morning paper arrives. So the options in America's most caffeinated city are elaborate and endless: bowls of white-capped cappuccino at the Cherry Street Coffeehouse, mugs of dark chocolate mocha at Tully's, shots of Turkish espresso at Cafe Paloma. And, of course, Starbucks. Everywhere. The homegrown coffee company, whose flagship store at the city's public market launched a national obsession, also made Herman Melville's chief mate - Mr. Starbuck - ubiquitous on Seattle street corners.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2001
Her three children are strapped safely in the back of the sport utility vehicle, and Elise Reekie needs her morning latte for the drive to sports camp. But there's no time to get to the nearest gourmet coffee place, unbuckle the kids and strap them back in, so Reekie heads for the drive-through coffee kiosk in Edgewater for her large almond skim milk latte. "I need my special coffee; it's psychological," Reekie says. For other picky coffee drinkers pressed for time, Coffe No Delay has become a lifesaver.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 23, 2003
Clip-on shades are nothing new to folks who wear glasses, but Jon Ressler is hoping they'll be worth a million to him. Ressler, who recently opened a kiosk selling custom-made clip-ons in The Mall in Columbia with partner Chad Weaver, has seen strong sales after a few weeks in business. Now the 25-year-old Columbia resident and his partner hope for a loan from the Jim Rouse Entrepreneurial Fund to help them expand and set up shop in the Annapolis mall next month. The fledgling company is on pace to clear $15,000 its first month in business, he said, and, he hopes, about $150,000 annually.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
Stores that buy used cellphones in Baltimore County would be regulated like pawnshops and automated cellphone-purchasing kiosks would be banned altogether under legislation unveiled Thursday by Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz. Kamenetz said he would ask the County Council to approve the proposals by March in an effort to combat what he said is the growing problem of cellphone theft. One bill would ban the kiosks, which are found in malls and give users cash for used phones and other small electronic devices.
NEWS
January 15, 2014
The company that runs malls in Towson, Columbia, Owings Mills and White Marsh is removing cellphone-recycling kiosks from its Maryland locations after politicians voiced concerns that the machines contribute to cellphone thefts, including a rash of robberies in north Baltimore last summer.. In August, at least five juveniles and one adult were arrested in a string of street robberies of pedestriands and joggers. Police said at the time that the suspects were thoght to be turing the machines in at Towson Town Center for cash.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2013
The company that runs malls in Towson, Columbia, Owings Mills and White Marsh is removing cellphone-recycling kiosks from its Maryland locations after politicians voiced concerns that the machines contribute to cellphone thefts. General Growth Properties is taking ecoATMs out of all its properties in the state, a spokesman for the Chicago-based company said Tuesday. The kiosks, which have been called "reverse vending machines," allow users to receive cash for used phones and other small electronic devices.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Louis E. Schmidt, a retired state assistant attorney general who was an acting secretary of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, died of congestive heart failure Oct. 29 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 87 and lived in Sparks. Born in Baltimore and raised in Pimlico, he was the son of George Schmidt, an architect, and Mary Hemmeter, a homemaker. His father died when he was 1 year old. After the 1929 market crash, his mother lost her home and savings, and he was sent to live with relatives.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2013
Security officials at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine campus in East Baltimore are stepping up patrols and plan to add another officer kiosk in response to several robberies and assaults of Hopkins employees since the middle of last month, according to Corporate Security, the company that patrols the campus. Officials said foot and bike patrols have been increased along North Wolfe and North Washington streets between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. after the first episode on July 14, and alerts were sent to employees.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2013
Baltimore police will work in the coming months with the manufacturer of kiosks that pay cash for broken or used electronics to avoid a possible citywide ban, driven by concerns that the devices entice thieves. The new regulations are expected to be considered by the City Council in September. The council's Judiciary and Legislative Investigations Committee agreed in a 3-0 vote to direct the Police Department to work with ecoATM to develop a system to would allow police to investigate whether certain electronics were stolen and then sold.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2001
Tanya Nixon dared to try. The former day care teacher from Ellicott City was frustrated with the unavailability of products with an African-American flair. Most cards, books and gifts in card stores were devoid of black faces and topics to distinguish them as African-American. So she started looking for items that appealed to her, and that she thought would appeal to others to sell at home parties and trade shows as part of a weekend, home-based business. Two-and-a-half years later, Nixon's Greetings from Women Who Dare has a kiosk and a small niche of wall space at the storefront where a restaurant is scheduled to open in Arundel Mills mall.
NEWS
June 4, 1997
The Motor Vehicle Administration and officials of Carroll County and Cranberry Mall will unveil the new Access Maryland self-service kiosk at 3 p.m. tomorrow at the mall in Westminster.The Cranberry Mall ATM-style kiosk will be the third in the state and the only one in Carroll County that allows residents to quickly and easily renew vehicle registrations.Demonstrating the kiosk will be MVA administrator Anne S. Ferro.Information: 410-437-7483 or 410-768-7386.Pub Date: 6/04/97
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | May 20, 2013
  Shoe and apparel retailer Johnston & Murphy has opened in Towson Town Center in Towson. The new 1,842-square-foot store, which opened Friday, is located on the mall's second level in the Crate & Barrel wing, mall officials said. The Towson store, the sixth in Maryland, sells business, leisure and loungewear apparel for men and women. Johnston & Murphy started in 1850 as a men's retailer but introduced a line of women's shoes, clothing and accessories five years ago. UPDATE: Another new location for Johnston & Murphy is a kiosk on concourse A/B at Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, where the retailer also has a full-sized store on concourse D. The 165-square-foot kiosk opened about a week ago, said a spokeswoman for Airmall USA, the airport's retail manager.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2012
Surveillance video helped police arrest a security guard at the Arundel Mills Mall who has been charged with stealing a safe filled with gold jewelry and money, according to Anne Arundel County police. Authorities said they are seeking a second suspect. The guard, John Thomas Cook IV, 22, of the 500 block of Ski Lane in Millersville, was arrested Monday and charged with one count of theft between $10,000 and $100,000. Police declined to say how much money or jewelry was in the safe.
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