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NEWS
By Dan Berger | December 18, 1996
They will have a horror flick out next month about the freighter that sank N'leans.By swallowing McDonnell Douglas, Boeing will make the widest body in the world.A survey shows that 23 percent of Americans never read a newspaper, 46 percent never listen to radio news and 53 percent never truthfully answer stupid prying questions.Cheer up. Mobutu Sese Seko has returned to Kinshasa.Pub Date: 12/18/96
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,Sun Staff | April 1, 2007
Kinshasa, Congo -- Under the swirling lights at the nightclub L'Atmosphere, Congolese music's hottest new star is in full swing. "This love was like a novel by Shakespeare," croons Fally Ipupa as his backup singers harmonize and the single-plucked guitars run circles around each other. "You turn it into one by Daniel Dafoe/ I stay isolated like Robinson Crusoe." Fally, as everyone calls him, has a weakness for Americana. His hat of choice is a New York Yankees cap. His jeans ride low in belated emulation of the boxers-baring hip-hop style.
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TOPIC
By Carter Dougherty and Carter Dougherty,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 10, 2003
GOMA, Congo -- For Didier Abonge, a telephone link between this city on the border with Rwanda and the capital, Kinshasa, means that the Democratic Republic of Congo's civil war is over. A marketing manager for a mobile telephone company, Abonge has arrived in Goma with blue-and-orange billboards, T-shirts and leaflets to sell service in the town where rebels began a war five years ago against the government. The conflict has taken 3.3 million lives, according to the aid group International Rescue Committee.
TOPIC
By Carter Dougherty and Carter Dougherty,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 10, 2003
GOMA, Congo -- For Didier Abonge, a telephone link between this city on the border with Rwanda and the capital, Kinshasa, means that the Democratic Republic of Congo's civil war is over. A marketing manager for a mobile telephone company, Abonge has arrived in Goma with blue-and-orange billboards, T-shirts and leaflets to sell service in the town where rebels began a war five years ago against the government. The conflict has taken 3.3 million lives, according to the aid group International Rescue Committee.
NEWS
May 30, 1997
LAURENT KABILA's government mocks the constitutional provisions laboriously drafted by the ousted Mobutu regime. By claiming to govern presidentially without a prime minister, and by decree, Mr. Kabila is not only resisting the pretensions of Etienne Tshisekedi. He is proclaiming revolution rather than evolution for the Democratic Republic of Congo, formerly Zaire.The first 13 cabinet ministers kept the key portfolios among his loyal lieutenants. Others went to men associated with the political opposition to Mobutu Sese Seko.
NEWS
November 21, 1998
Land mines make Senegal province unusable, report saysDAKAR -- Land mines have made 80 percent of land in Senegal's fertile southern province of Casamance unusable, a local human rights watchdog said yesterday.The RADDHO (African Grouping for Human Rights) said that the anti-personnel mines, blamed mainly on separatist rebels, had killed or wounded close to 500 people this year through August, including 61 soldiers.The Movement of Democratic Forces of Casamance took up arms in 1982, accusing the former French colony's central government of neglecting the province.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 18, 1996
KINSHASA, Zaire -- His step was slow, his body appeared frail and his voice often faltered. But Mobutu Sese Seko, Africa's longest-serving ruler and, some say, one of its most venal tyrants, clearly basked in the glow of a triumphant return home yesterday after four months in Europe for cancer treatment.At the airport, he raised his silver-topped cane above his leopard-skin hat and slowly twirled in a circle atop a red-carpeted podium to acknowledge the blaring brass band, marching honor guards, grinning officials, thousands of supporters and scores of reporters who had flocked to see him.Huge crowds, including many people wearing shirts and dresses emblazoned with his portrait, cheered, waved flags and sang as his stretch Cadillac limousine, accompanied by trucks of heavily armed commandos and mounted anti-aircraft guns, bounced along potholed roads for 20 miles from the airport to his palace inside a military base overlooking a bend in the Congo River.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 15, 1995
KIKWIT, Zaire -- Sister Dinarosa Belleri, an Italian nursing nun who devoted nearly three decades to serving the poor and sick here, had an unusual funeral yesterday in the sad and dusty graveyard behind the city's cathedral.The coffin came on a hospital gurney. The five pallbearers wore full-length green gowns, heavy plastic goggles, surgical face masks, white helmets, thick gloves and knee-high rubber boots. They nearly dropped the casket before nervously lowering it into the freshly dug grave.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,Sun Staff | April 1, 2007
Kinshasa, Congo -- Under the swirling lights at the nightclub L'Atmosphere, Congolese music's hottest new star is in full swing. "This love was like a novel by Shakespeare," croons Fally Ipupa as his backup singers harmonize and the single-plucked guitars run circles around each other. "You turn it into one by Daniel Dafoe/ I stay isolated like Robinson Crusoe." Fally, as everyone calls him, has a weakness for Americana. His hat of choice is a New York Yankees cap. His jeans ride low in belated emulation of the boxers-baring hip-hop style.
NEWS
By CINDY SHINER | July 5, 1992
Kinshasa, Zaire. -- It's another hot Saturday afternoon in Kinshasa as Stephanie, Mireille and Rosy shuffle their tired teen-age bodies into the Domino bar on the Boulevard 30 Juin for a beer.Stephanie is wearing the same backless red flowered dress she danced in at the Spikizy (pronounced speak-easy) the night before, and Mireille has been whistling the tune to the song, "Let's talk about sex, baby.""I'm better off than before," says Stephanie, 18. "There was no work, the family didn't have anything, and I was obliged to do it," she says of the decision she made the day her mother died to leave school and become a prostitute.
NEWS
August 17, 2001
FROM CARROLL County to the heart of Africa, an international relief effort is under way to rebuild the health care system of war-torn Democratic Republic of the Congo. Aiding a long-established network of locally run missionary clin- ics and hospitals, Interchurch Medical Assistance, Inc., in New Windsor, will use a $25 million federal grant to provide badly needed medicines and health supplies to the Central African country. Millions have died as a result of civil and ethnic wars in the Congo over the past decade, most of them from the widespread breakdown in health and nutrition services.
NEWS
November 21, 1998
Land mines make Senegal province unusable, report saysDAKAR -- Land mines have made 80 percent of land in Senegal's fertile southern province of Casamance unusable, a local human rights watchdog said yesterday.The RADDHO (African Grouping for Human Rights) said that the anti-personnel mines, blamed mainly on separatist rebels, had killed or wounded close to 500 people this year through August, including 61 soldiers.The Movement of Democratic Forces of Casamance took up arms in 1982, accusing the former French colony's central government of neglecting the province.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 1998
SPREADING THE WORD about missionaries who serve in the world's challenging areas was one theme of the musical "Prayerworks," sung by the Kid's Choir on Sunday at North Carroll Assembly of God church in Manchester.The 28-member choir of boys and girls, ages 3 through 11, were directed by Cindy Myers, former vocal music teacher at North Carroll Middle School.The children's performance was part of a two-day mission-awareness convention coinciding with a visit from the Rev. Gary Dickinson and his family, who serve as missionaries in the Congo.
NEWS
May 30, 1997
LAURENT KABILA's government mocks the constitutional provisions laboriously drafted by the ousted Mobutu regime. By claiming to govern presidentially without a prime minister, and by decree, Mr. Kabila is not only resisting the pretensions of Etienne Tshisekedi. He is proclaiming revolution rather than evolution for the Democratic Republic of Congo, formerly Zaire.The first 13 cabinet ministers kept the key portfolios among his loyal lieutenants. Others went to men associated with the political opposition to Mobutu Sese Seko.
NEWS
May 1, 1997
WHETHER President Mobutu Sese Seko takes advantage of a South African offer to meet with Zairian rebels matters less and less as each hour passes. His misrule is coming to the end.In seven months, the rebels have seized more than half of Africa's third-largest nation. Yesterday, they captured Kikwit, a city on a major highway 250 miles east of the capital. "The next stop is Kinshasa," a rebel spokesman said.The U.S. position is revealing. After propping up the regime for so long, Washington now wants President Mobutu to resign so democratic elections can be held and the possible disintegration of Zaire avoided.
NEWS
By Scott Straus and Scott Straus,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 9, 1997
KINSHASA, Zaire -- For a time, Kinshasa University had the best equipment money could buy.Now, its halls are littered with broken desks and broken equipment. Physics students perform their experiments in empty wine bottles. Professors last received their $30 monthly salary in December."It's not only here," says Okuma Kassende, head of the school's chemistry department. "The university is an example of what is happening all over the country. You find the same thing in the hospitals, in the primary and secondary schools, and in government buildings."
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 1998
SPREADING THE WORD about missionaries who serve in the world's challenging areas was one theme of the musical "Prayerworks," sung by the Kid's Choir on Sunday at North Carroll Assembly of God church in Manchester.The 28-member choir of boys and girls, ages 3 through 11, were directed by Cindy Myers, former vocal music teacher at North Carroll Middle School.The children's performance was part of a two-day mission-awareness convention coinciding with a visit from the Rev. Gary Dickinson and his family, who serve as missionaries in the Congo.
NEWS
August 17, 2001
FROM CARROLL County to the heart of Africa, an international relief effort is under way to rebuild the health care system of war-torn Democratic Republic of the Congo. Aiding a long-established network of locally run missionary clin- ics and hospitals, Interchurch Medical Assistance, Inc., in New Windsor, will use a $25 million federal grant to provide badly needed medicines and health supplies to the Central African country. Millions have died as a result of civil and ethnic wars in the Congo over the past decade, most of them from the widespread breakdown in health and nutrition services.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | December 18, 1996
They will have a horror flick out next month about the freighter that sank N'leans.By swallowing McDonnell Douglas, Boeing will make the widest body in the world.A survey shows that 23 percent of Americans never read a newspaper, 46 percent never listen to radio news and 53 percent never truthfully answer stupid prying questions.Cheer up. Mobutu Sese Seko has returned to Kinshasa.Pub Date: 12/18/96
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 18, 1996
KINSHASA, Zaire -- His step was slow, his body appeared frail and his voice often faltered. But Mobutu Sese Seko, Africa's longest-serving ruler and, some say, one of its most venal tyrants, clearly basked in the glow of a triumphant return home yesterday after four months in Europe for cancer treatment.At the airport, he raised his silver-topped cane above his leopard-skin hat and slowly twirled in a circle atop a red-carpeted podium to acknowledge the blaring brass band, marching honor guards, grinning officials, thousands of supporters and scores of reporters who had flocked to see him.Huge crowds, including many people wearing shirts and dresses emblazoned with his portrait, cheered, waved flags and sang as his stretch Cadillac limousine, accompanied by trucks of heavily armed commandos and mounted anti-aircraft guns, bounced along potholed roads for 20 miles from the airport to his palace inside a military base overlooking a bend in the Congo River.
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