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By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | April 5, 1992
LONDON -- Neil Kinnock lost his temper in the House of Commons not too long ago and called a Conservative member of Parliament "a jerk."A blizzard of press criticism fell on him.It was a mistake. More in anger with himself than regret, he apologized.Mr. Kinnock is a politically impassioned man who has spent the last half-decade shedding his color and suppressing his passion. The Neil Kinnock of the early days was too rich for Britain's mainstream electorate.But sometimes the passion will come out. About three years ago, during a television interview on the subject of the Conservatives' handling of the economy, he burst forth: "Look, they are smashing up our country.
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NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | November 17, 1992
LONDON -- Nearly everyone knows how sensitive the English are to the way people speak.This was understood long before George Bernard Shaw wrote "Pygmalion," the play which, when transmuted into the musical "My Fair Lady," taught those who didn't already know it's not what is said that matters so much as how it is said.The idea is familiar in the United States, though it is not so divisive there as it is here. Which is not to say Americans aren't susceptible to linguistic snobbery.Every shrewd American advertising man knows that if you want to sell a product that has pretentions to quality, hire somebody with an English public school accent to talk about it.(English public schools, of course, are not public at all in the American sense.
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NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | April 14, 1992
LONDON -- Neil Kinnock, the man who brought the Labor Party out of the wilderness -- but just not far enough -- resigned the party leadership yesterday.After Thursday's defeat at the hands of the Conservatives, it was expected.In a statement to his colleagues, the red-haired Welshman who rebuilt the Labor Party from a ruin of union and leftist domination, then for eight years harried and challenged Margaret Thatcher and her successor, John Major, said, "I will not be seeking re-election as leader of the Labor Party."
NEWS
May 5, 1992
Fresh from his election, Britain's Prime Minister John Major reshuffled his cabinet. This is no longer a revised government of his predecessor, Margaret Thatcher, but a new one, bearing the stamp of its leader. Mr. Major has hit the ground running.That's what comes from a system that gives a working majority of 52 percent of the seats in the House of Commons to the party that won only 42 percent of the vote. The opposition Labor Party won 34.4 percent of the vote for 42 percent of the seats.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 3, 1990
BLACKPOOL, England -- Labor Party leader Neil Kinnock presented himself to British voters yesterday as prime-minister-in-waiting, eager for power at home and influence abroad."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | November 30, 1990
LONDON -- Prime Minister John Major confronted Labor opposition leader Neil Kinnock for the first time across the aisle of the House of Commons yesterday in the debut of the new political trial of strength now engaged here.Margaret Thatcher MP, reduced overnight to the back benches of the House of Commons, watched from an aisle seat on the fourth row from which she delivered her maiden parliamentary speech 30 years ago, as the two men who will contest the next general election squared off.Opinion polls showed that overnight the Conservatives under Mr. Major had stolen an 11 percentage-point lead over Labor under Mr. Kinnock, dramatically reversing the popularity advantage the opposition had held for the past year.
NEWS
April 13, 1992
Britain's Tories are on a roll. Their victory Thursday was their fourth straight since 1979. It is going to be harder and harder for the British electorate to bring itself to trust power to the Labor Party, which has been out of it so long there are few Labor members of Parliament whom anyone can imagine as a prime minister.In a sporting sense, you have to applaud this outcome. The pundits and pollsters took a pasting. First, it looked like a "hung Parliament," making a fragile coalition likely.
NEWS
By Gilbert A.Lewthwaite and Gilbert A.Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 2, 1990
BLACKPOOL -- Britain's Labor Party, poll-positioned for electoral victory on current performance, celebrated yesterday its political ascendancy with a series of swinging attacks on the past 11 years of Thatcherism.Lambasting the government's economic management, industrial policy and education reforms, Labor opened its annual conference here with a claim to be a viable alternative government.It hit Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher particularly hard where it hurts most these days -- on the economy.
NEWS
May 5, 1992
Fresh from his election, Britain's Prime Minister John Major reshuffled his cabinet. This is no longer a revised government of his predecessor, Margaret Thatcher, but a new one, bearing the stamp of its leader. Mr. Major has hit the ground running.That's what comes from a system that gives a working majority of 52 percent of the seats in the House of Commons to the party that won only 42 percent of the vote. The opposition Labor Party won 34.4 percent of the vote for 42 percent of the seats.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | April 6, 1992
Britain goes to the polls Thursday to put a quiet end to 13 years of radical government. The election closes the astonishing epoch of Margaret Thatcher. It makes no great difference whether Prime Minister John Major or Neil Kinnock wins this election and forms the next government. The radical years are over.Mrs. Thatcher's legacy has overshadowed Mr. Major's year at Downing Street, where he has been occupied chiefly in disengaging the Tory Party from the problems she left behind, such as the poll tax. The legacy is a mixed one, but far more positive than that of her friend Ronald Reagan.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | April 14, 1992
LONDON -- Neil Kinnock, the man who brought the Labor Party out of the wilderness -- but just not far enough -- resigned the party leadership yesterday.After Thursday's defeat at the hands of the Conservatives, it was expected.In a statement to his colleagues, the red-haired Welshman who rebuilt the Labor Party from a ruin of union and leftist domination, then for eight years harried and challenged Margaret Thatcher and her successor, John Major, said, "I will not be seeking re-election as leader of the Labor Party."
NEWS
April 13, 1992
Britain's Tories are on a roll. Their victory Thursday was their fourth straight since 1979. It is going to be harder and harder for the British electorate to bring itself to trust power to the Labor Party, which has been out of it so long there are few Labor members of Parliament whom anyone can imagine as a prime minister.In a sporting sense, you have to applaud this outcome. The pundits and pollsters took a pasting. First, it looked like a "hung Parliament," making a fragile coalition likely.
NEWS
April 11, 1992
The Conservative government's re-election in Britain is the greatest comeback by an underdog ruling party since Harry Truman retained the U.S. presidency in 1948. With four election victories in 13 years, the current Tories are building the longest unbroken rule in modern British history.Prime Minister John Major, a self-made and self-effacing man who won the party leadership and prime ministry in late 1990 after the imperious Margaret Thatcher outwore her welcome, finally comes into his own. A cabinet reshuffle can be expected, after which Mrs. Thatcher is history.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | April 6, 1992
Britain goes to the polls Thursday to put a quiet end to 13 years of radical government. The election closes the astonishing epoch of Margaret Thatcher. It makes no great difference whether Prime Minister John Major or Neil Kinnock wins this election and forms the next government. The radical years are over.Mrs. Thatcher's legacy has overshadowed Mr. Major's year at Downing Street, where he has been occupied chiefly in disengaging the Tory Party from the problems she left behind, such as the poll tax. The legacy is a mixed one, but far more positive than that of her friend Ronald Reagan.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | April 5, 1992
LONDON -- Neil Kinnock lost his temper in the House of Commons not too long ago and called a Conservative member of Parliament "a jerk."A blizzard of press criticism fell on him.It was a mistake. More in anger with himself than regret, he apologized.Mr. Kinnock is a politically impassioned man who has spent the last half-decade shedding his color and suppressing his passion. The Neil Kinnock of the early days was too rich for Britain's mainstream electorate.But sometimes the passion will come out. About three years ago, during a television interview on the subject of the Conservatives' handling of the economy, he burst forth: "Look, they are smashing up our country.
NEWS
By RICHARD O'MARA and RICHARD O'MARA,Richard O'Mara is The Baltimore Sun's London correspondent | March 29, 1992
London.-- The British are animated by martial things, the beat and blare of drums and brass, the clop, clop, clop of the marching Horse Guards, the sight of unfurled battle flags.So it is not surprising their elections are conducted like wars without the blood; politicians, reporters and pundits alike are steeped in the language of siege. John Major, the Prime Minister, rides to his campaign rallies in a "battle bus."Last week, having suffered reverses in the first engagements of the electoral campaign, the Conservative Party leaders turned to Margaret Thatcher, their erstwhile chief.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | November 17, 1992
LONDON -- Nearly everyone knows how sensitive the English are to the way people speak.This was understood long before George Bernard Shaw wrote "Pygmalion," the play which, when transmuted into the musical "My Fair Lady," taught those who didn't already know it's not what is said that matters so much as how it is said.The idea is familiar in the United States, though it is not so divisive there as it is here. Which is not to say Americans aren't susceptible to linguistic snobbery.Every shrewd American advertising man knows that if you want to sell a product that has pretentions to quality, hire somebody with an English public school accent to talk about it.(English public schools, of course, are not public at all in the American sense.
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON | October 25, 1991
Washington--The first great scandal of the new political season is upon us, and the guilty candidate may never recover.I refer not to a congressional investigator's report that Republican Dick Thornburgh, now running for the Senate in Pennsylvania, refused for years as attorney general to follow up leads about the BCCI mess.That multinational banking outrage is trivial beside what Democrat Jerry Brown did within minutes of starting his third try for president. He has committed the sin that drove another Democrat out of contention in 1988 -- a sin so dreadful it is denounced from the pulpits of the land: plagiarism.
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON | October 25, 1991
Washington--The first great scandal of the new political season is upon us, and the guilty candidate may never recover.I refer not to a congressional investigator's report that Republican Dick Thornburgh, now running for the Senate in Pennsylvania, refused for years as attorney general to follow up leads about the BCCI mess.That multinational banking outrage is trivial beside what Democrat Jerry Brown did within minutes of starting his third try for president. He has committed the sin that drove another Democrat out of contention in 1988 -- a sin so dreadful it is denounced from the pulpits of the land: plagiarism.
NEWS
By Daniel Berger | December 1, 1990
THE BRITISH have replaced a Reagan with a Bush. With startling speed, the 372 voters have called off the Thatcher revolution to consolidate its gains.Where Margaret Thatcher is passionate, John Major is calm; where she is determined, he seeks consensus; where she is doctrinaire, he is pragmatic. And where she is a caricature of herself, he is a bland if handsome chap whom people are not inclined to dislike.The Conservative Members of Parliament were not choosing their leader ideologically.
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