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NEWS
October 6, 2008
NICK REYNOLDS, 75 Founding member of the Kingston Trio Nick Reynolds, a founding member of the Kingston Trio whose smooth tenor and gift for harmonizing helped propel the group to worldwide fame in the folk-music revival of the late 1950s and early '60s, died Wednesday in San Diego. The cause was respiratory disease, said his son Joshua Reynolds. Whether singing high harmony or taking the lead part in songs like "MTA," "The Wanderer" and "Hobo's Lullaby," Mr. Reynolds, who played tenor guitar, helped define the clean, close-harmony style that brought folk music into countless American homes for the first time.
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NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | September 19, 2009
For a junior high school civics lesson in 1963, we were asked to bring to class something illustrating what my teacher called "current events." I brought the album "Peter, Paul and Mary," a recording by three young folk singers who had recently made a name for themselves in New York's Greenwich Village. The album cover showed three hip young people dressed in black. The two guys, Peter Yarrow and Paul Stookey, wore neatly trimmed little goatees. Mary Travers, who died this week at the age of 72, wore her blond hair long with bangs.
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NEWS
March 24, 1991
Albert McKinley Rains, who wrote some of the nation's most important housing laws during two decades in the U.S. House of Representatives, died Friday at a hospital in Gadsden, Ala., where he was being treated for pneumonia. He was 89. Mr. Rains was elected to Congress in 1944 as a Democrat representing northern Alabama's 5th District. He retired in 1965.Dave Guard, a founding member of the folk group Kingston Trio, which helped fuel the folk music boom of the late 1950s and early 1960s, died Friday at his home in Rollinsford, N.H. He was 56. A family member said he died of lymphoma.
NEWS
October 6, 2008
NICK REYNOLDS, 75 Founding member of the Kingston Trio Nick Reynolds, a founding member of the Kingston Trio whose smooth tenor and gift for harmonizing helped propel the group to worldwide fame in the folk-music revival of the late 1950s and early '60s, died Wednesday in San Diego. The cause was respiratory disease, said his son Joshua Reynolds. Whether singing high harmony or taking the lead part in songs like "MTA," "The Wanderer" and "Hobo's Lullaby," Mr. Reynolds, who played tenor guitar, helped define the clean, close-harmony style that brought folk music into countless American homes for the first time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | June 25, 1998
Latino FestLearn to dance the salsa and merengue, tap your feet to the beat of Latin jazz, applaud dancers in colorful costumes and sample Hispanic cuisine from the Americas and the Caribbean this weekend at the Latino Fest at Patterson Park, Eastern and Linwood avenues. You can also admire traditional arts and crafts, and there will be face-painting and clowns to entertain children. Hours for the festival are noon to 9 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Admission is $2 for adults, free for children.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | September 19, 2009
For a junior high school civics lesson in 1963, we were asked to bring to class something illustrating what my teacher called "current events." I brought the album "Peter, Paul and Mary," a recording by three young folk singers who had recently made a name for themselves in New York's Greenwich Village. The album cover showed three hip young people dressed in black. The two guys, Peter Yarrow and Paul Stookey, wore neatly trimmed little goatees. Mary Travers, who died this week at the age of 72, wore her blond hair long with bangs.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | January 27, 1994
When he was about 11, recalls Ezra Idlet, he'd sit in his house off Mount Royal Avenue, blasting a Kingston Trio album out the windows and rhythmically playing along on a snare drum he received in exchange for washing a neighbor's steps."
FEATURES
August 16, 1992
Music lovers from around the country are heading for Bethlehem, Pa., and Musikfest '92, a nine-day multicultural music festival, which opened yesterday and continues through Aug. 23.With more than 600 musical performances, you're bound to find some of your favorites -- everything from Bach to bluegrass. Lou Rawls, Trisha Yearwood, The Kingston Trio, Maureen McGovern, America, Neil Sedaka and The Captain & Tennille are among the headline acts. Dance bands, magicians, jugglers and other street performers set a lively pace on Main Street, and a children's area offers a backyard circus, storytelling, puppets, children's theater and craft projects.
NEWS
July 31, 1996
Evelyn Danzig Levine,94, co-author of the 1950s standard "Scarlet Ribbons" popularized by Harry Belafonte and recorded by Sinead O'Connor, the Kingston Trio and others, died Friday in Los Angeles.She collaborated with lyricist Jack Segal to produce many songs, including "Where I May Live With My Love," recorded by Tommy Edwards; "The Wonder of Wonderful You," recorded by Brock Peters; "When a Warmhearted Woman Loves a Coldhearted Man" for Dinah Shore; and "Midnight in Manhattan."But "Scarlet Ribbons" was their biggest hit. Joan Baez, Wayne Newton, Danny Thomas and Mary O'Hara also were among those to record it.Eric Ridder,78, a gold-medal winning Olympic yachtsman and former publisher of the Journal of Commerce & Commercial, died of pneumonia July 23 in Locust Valley, N.Y. He was publisher of the Journal of Commerce from 1956 to 1985 and was its general manager from 1946 to 1956.
NEWS
October 11, 1996
Walter F. Kerr,83, a Pulitzer Prize-winning author and drama critic for the New York Times, died of congestive heart failure Wednesday in New York.He started his career in 1949 at Commonweal, a Roman Catholic weekly, and earned his reputation as a penetrating and insightful critic while writing for the New York Herald Tribune from 1951 to 1966.After the Herald folded, he went to work for the Times from 1966 until he retired in 1983. He was honored in 1990 when the restored Ritz Theater on West 48th Street in Manhattan was renamed The Walter Kerr Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | June 25, 1998
Latino FestLearn to dance the salsa and merengue, tap your feet to the beat of Latin jazz, applaud dancers in colorful costumes and sample Hispanic cuisine from the Americas and the Caribbean this weekend at the Latino Fest at Patterson Park, Eastern and Linwood avenues. You can also admire traditional arts and crafts, and there will be face-painting and clowns to entertain children. Hours for the festival are noon to 9 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Admission is $2 for adults, free for children.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | January 27, 1994
When he was about 11, recalls Ezra Idlet, he'd sit in his house off Mount Royal Avenue, blasting a Kingston Trio album out the windows and rhythmically playing along on a snare drum he received in exchange for washing a neighbor's steps."
NEWS
March 24, 1991
Albert McKinley Rains, who wrote some of the nation's most important housing laws during two decades in the U.S. House of Representatives, died Friday at a hospital in Gadsden, Ala., where he was being treated for pneumonia. He was 89. Mr. Rains was elected to Congress in 1944 as a Democrat representing northern Alabama's 5th District. He retired in 1965.Dave Guard, a founding member of the folk group Kingston Trio, which helped fuel the folk music boom of the late 1950s and early 1960s, died Friday at his home in Rollinsford, N.H. He was 56. A family member said he died of lymphoma.
FEATURES
By PATRICK A. McGUIRE | December 2, 1990
The American Songbag.Carl Sandburg.Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.495 pages. $16.95 (paperback). The late Carl Sandburg probably is best remembered for "The Prairie Years" and "The War Years," the most definitive and readable biographies to date of Abraham Lincoln and the works largely responsible for the reverence with which Lincoln is held by 20th century America. Lesser known, but not necessarily less appreciated, are Sandburg's 10 volumes of lyrical poetry, including "Smoke and Steel," "Slabs of Sunburnt West" and "Good Morning, America."
NEWS
By Rob Hiaasen | October 3, 2000
TO: Mark David Chapman. From: Someone whose favorite Beatle was John Lennon, thank you very much. Subject: Your pending parole board hearing. I read where you said you might have murdered John Lennon to punish your father. You said your father never told you he loved you. "Perhaps I was getting him back, killing John Lennon," you told a British tabloid. Bravo! This is Beatles music to my ears. Ever since you gunned down Lennon 20 years ago, I have been waiting for a rational explanation.
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