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SPORTS
March 14, 2012
A nuclear scan helped doctors diagnose Animal Kingdom with the start of a stress fracture in his hind end. The injury won't require surgery, and the Kentucky Derby winner could return to full training after 30 days of rest and 60 days of light work. But his connections also raised the possibility of retirement so that the colt could be put out to stud. "Team Valor's interest is to run the horse for another year," Team Valor International CEO Barry Irwin said in a statement.
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SPORTS
By Chris Korman | March 12, 2012
Animal Kingdom's career is once again on hold. Last year's Kentucky Derby winner came up lame -- with soreness in the same leg that required surgery last June -- during a training run in Florida according to his Maryland-based trainer, Graham Motion. "Disappointed for everyone involved," he wrote on Twitter, "especially the horse. Hope to get him back on the track. " Motion and Team Valor CEO Barry Irwin had planned for Animal Kingdom, who had run in just one race since being hurt in the Belmont, to run in the $10 million Dubai World Cup on March 31. “This is a crushing blow for our company and our partners as well as our trainer, who has done such a great job getting the horse back to this point,” Irwin said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | February 29, 2012
"Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning" Developer: Big Huge Games/38 Studios Platform: Xbox 360/PS3/PC Score: 8/10 “Kingoms of Amalur: Reckoning” is not “Skyrim,” and that is completely OK. It seems unfair to review such an ambitious game solely through the lens of a title that came out three months earlier in the same genre. Even if said title was the best game released in 2011, if not ever . It would be too easy to line them up side-by-side and see how “Kingdoms” stacks up against a game it wasn't trying to directly challenge in the first place.  “Kingdoms” is less about the “open world” and more about the “open experience.” Make no mistake, while the fictional realm of Amalur is vast and varied, there are invisible walls in in the world of “Kingdoms.” Whereas a very sandbox-heavy open world title might require the player to be a “self starter” to get the full experience, “Kingdoms” falls closer to the end of the gameplay spectrum that continualy nudges you to building your player's history even if it's not at all a linear path to a dramatic end. To make one final comparison to “Skyrim” for those intent on equating the experience, “Skyrim” is a big ball of clay and “Kingdoms” is one of the biggest Lego sets money can buy. Some have also unfavorably compared it to a single player version of “World of Warcraft,” but for many, including this reviewer, that was the most pleasurable...
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 23, 2011
Perhaps there has been nothing more baffling to American eyes than the photographs of hordes of obviously grief-stricken North Koreans mourning the death of their 69-year-old dictator, Kim Jong Il. Under his reign and that of his father, the people of the globe's most closed society have remained mired in repression and poverty for 63 years. The genuine remorse, akin to what customarily is reserved for the passing of close personal family members, demonstrated the uncommon hold the departed leader had over his people.
NEWS
December 21, 2011
Thanks for the fascinating article about the Bradley Foundations financed by donations originating from the Koch and Scaife billions ("The right's $350 million idea train," Dec. 18). Too bad this wealth cannot be devoted to good works like alleviating poverty, ignorance and disease, as the Rockefeller and Carnegie fortunes did in the past and Gates, Buffet and Soros families are doing at present. Instead, the Bradley Foundation is acting as a "malefactor of great wealth," as Teddy Roosevelt famously put it, to peddle its extreme right-wing ideology.
NEWS
December 19, 2011
The death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il leaves a cloud of uncertainty over North Asia and complicates efforts by the U.S. and its allies to halt the nuclear weapons program that is the principal legacy of his 17-year rule. Kim was a canny and manipulative despot who repeatedly thwarted efforts by more powerful neighbors and adversaries like the United States to stabilize the Korean peninsula. Now that he is gone, the internal power struggle over succession could have unpredictable and perhaps dangerous consequences for the region and the world.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2011
Animal Kingdom, the 2011 Kentucky Derby winner, is back on the training track at the Fair Hill Training Center and being pointed toward the $10 million Dubai World Cup in late March. Trainer Graham Motion couldn't keep the delight from his voice as he talked about getting Animal Kingdom and Toby's Corner back onto the racetrack. Both have recovered from injuries that sidelined them for the second half of their 3-year-old seasons. "I think Animal Kingdom should still be a front-runner for the 3-year-old Eclipse Award," Motion said.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2011
Kentucky Derby winner Animal Kingdom, who came up lame in the days following the Belmont Stakes, has a slab fracture in his left hind leg that will require surgery. He will not race again this season, according to Team Valor CEO Barry Irwin and trainer Graham Motion. Animal Kingdom, who resides at the Fair Hill Training Facility in Elkton, had x-rays performed on his leg two weeks ago at the New Bolton Research Center in Kennett Square, Penn., and veterinarians detected a small defect in his leg — a fissure — they wanted to closely monitor.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2011
Kentucky Derby winnerAnimal Kingdom has a small fracture in the cannon bone in his left back leg and will be out of action for at least several weeks while doctors monitor his condition. The colt, who is conditioned by Maryland trainer Graham Motion and resides at the Fair Hill Training Center in Elkton, was involved in a collision shortly after the start of the Belmont Stakes and finished a disappointing sixth. Motion thought the horse looked stiff in the days after the race and had him checked out at the New Bolton Research Center in Kennett Square, Pa., which detected the injury during a bone scan.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2011
Monzon, the Maryland-bred horse owned by Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank and the first Sagamore Farm horse to run in a Triple Crown race since Native Dancer in 1953, didn't have a particularly great Belmont Stakes, finishing a disappointing ninth. But it was, in many respects, a memorable run. Seconds out of the gate, Monzon clipped heels withAnimal Kingdom, the 5-2 pre-race favorite, and it nearly resulted in a calamitous pile-up. Monzon seemed fine, but Animal Kingdom nearly went down, essentially ending his chances at becoming the first horse to win the Kentucky Derby and the Belmont since Thunder Gulch did it in 1995.
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