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NEWS
By Michael R. Driscoll and Michael R. Driscoll,Staff writer | July 26, 1991
Last week, as the dispute over the Debateable Lands to the north once again threatened to flame into war, the nobility of the Barony of Lochmere assembled to consider what to do.Ladies in fine gowns rehearsed the songs they would sing at court. Knights skirmished fiercely, practicing the tactics they would use in the coming conflict.Their cars lined up on the parking lot, waiting patiently, as other vehicles traced ribbons of light across the distant highway in thedeepening twilight.Wait a minute.
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NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Michael James contributed to this article | March 28, 1997
They were cyber-cruisers and stargazers, wise in the ways of Web sites and video cams. But in choosing to take their own lives, the 39 members of the "Heaven's Gate" cult proved to be spiritually more rooted to the low-tech era of the first century.That was an age when Gnostic philosophers sometimes advocated suicide as a quick means of transportation to the afterlife. And unlike the mass suicides and killings of cult members in Jonestown, Guyana, and Waco, Texas -- events triggered by outside threats -- members of Heaven's Gate apparently marched to death on their own timetable, concluding that the approaching Hale-Bopp comet was their call to salvation.
NEWS
February 8, 1991
"I guess you're never a king in your own kingdom." -- Gov. William Donald Schaefer to the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee."During a National Governors' Association meeting in Washington this week, Schaefer told some of his colleagues that the only way to cure states' displeasure with federal policies on health care and local aid would be for him to take over the White House." -- News item."I'm reminded of a line from Shakespeare's 'Julius Caesar.' 'Upon what meat doth this our Caesar feed, that he is grown so great?
NEWS
By Josh Meyer and Josh Meyer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 14, 2003
WASHINGTON - Monday's coordinated bombings in Riyadh drove home with deadly force how little is known about al-Qaida and the dangers the terrorist network poses to Saudi Arabia and the tens of thousands of Americans living there, officials of both nations said yesterday. For years, U.S. and Saudi authorities have analyzed the threat al-Qaida poses in the oil-rich kingdom perhaps more aggressively than anywhere else. But Monday's bombings have heightened concerns that more attacks are imminent and that al-Qaida has regrouped in a fashion that makes it harder than ever to detect.
FEATURES
By Judith Wynn and Judith Wynn,Contributing Writer | April 26, 1993
Benjamin "Chappie" Puttbutt III, the hero of Ishmael Reed's zany, scattershot ninth novel, wants to learn Japanese by spring. His father is a black U.S. general. His mother is a black U.S. intelligence agent. Consequently, "Puttbutt always seemed to be marching as though life were some kind of parade ground." He does know how to look out for No. 1: If Japan's going to rule the next century, better take private language lessons.As "Japanese by Spring" opens, Puttbutt has nearly ingratiated himself into a tenured position teaching English at Jack London College in Oakland, Calif.
NEWS
By Borut Grgic | August 12, 2002
ONCE A prosperous kingdom, an international, and a regional power, today's Saudi Arabia looks a little ragged. With mounting internal and external pressures, the ruling elite's hold on power has been spread thin. Not only has Saudi per capita income plummeted from a staggering $28,600 in 1981 to $6,800 last year, but its worth as a regional power and a reliable ally is being increasingly questioned, even challenged. Following Sept. 11, the Bush administration has been pressed to begin drafting alternatives to Saudi oil. After all, 15 of the 19 hijackers were Saudi and only 16 percent of Saudis have a favorable view of America.
NEWS
By BARBARA MALLONEE | February 13, 1991
Between the American Revolution and our Civil War, a Pennsylvania sign painter named Edward Hicks cast and recast a Biblical text into paintings called the ''Peaceable Kingdoms.'' Sixty renditions of Isaiah 11:6-9 are known to exist in private collections, in museums, libraries and galleries, and in the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Center in Williamsburg.The Bible is a record of divine determination to perfect. The ups and downs of Genesis are followed by books prophesying that the Lord repeatedly ''ariseth to shake terribly the world'' in order that a new order ensue.
NEWS
By DAVID AWBREY | August 1, 1995
What I especially admire about conservative Christians is that most of them are sincerely concerned about the nation's moral climate and few of them have used politics to enrich themselves financially.The reason most fundamentalist and evangelical Christians got involved in politics was a genuine revulsion toward abortion and the secularization of American society. They saw America in desperate need of spiritual revival and entered politics to help reverse what they perceived as the nation's cultural decline.
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | May 15, 1995
Washington -- It was a good week for social and religious conservatives. Ralph Reed, director of the Christian Coalition, made the cover of Time magazine. Inside, the juxtaposition of Mr. Reed talking on a cellular phone and a church steeple in the background gave the appearance that he was talking directly to God.The same week Republican presidential candidate Phil Gramm responded to the pleadings of social conservatives and emerged from his prayer closet to deliver a mighty fine speech on ''Freedom and Virtue'' at Jerry Falwell's Liberty University.
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