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NEWS
By Roger Twigg and Roger Twigg,Staff Writer | May 15, 1992
Former U.S. Attorney General Edwin Meese last night accused public officials who criticized the verdict in the Rodney King police brutality case of pouring "gas on the flames" rather than trying to ease tensions that led to rioting in Los Angeles two weeks ago.Mr. Meese said that the criticisms created "an atmosphere that appeared to justify the type of disorders that took place [in Los Angeles] and elsewhere in the United States.""It [the rioting] should not have happened," he said in a speech before the National Troopers Coalition,which is meeting at the BWI-Holiday Inn in Linthicum.
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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | April 19, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- For most of the past week, the kitchen table of Thesus Phelon's home in Jordan Downs -- a Watts housing project -- has been the national headquarters of the NAACP.The 22-year-old mother of three girls was host to Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis, the newly appointed executive director of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Mr. Chavis came to Jordan Downs to meet with the African-American community in preparation for the verdicts in the federal trial of the four officers accused of violating Rodney G. King's civil rights.
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SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | November 20, 1992
Morgan State University: Sixty-nine football players sign a petition to demand their coach be fired.South Carolina: A tense team meeting reaches a crescendo when one player rises and asks for the coach's resignation.Memphis State: Eighty-four of 100 players boycott a practice after the coach publicly blames the players for three consecutive losses.The times most definitely are a changin' in college football, a sport once shaped by iron-fisted coaches yet now rattled by sporadic player insurrections in nearly every corner of the country.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and John Rivera and Bill Glauber and John Rivera,Staff Writers | April 13, 1993
INGLEWOOD, Calif. -- This was a deployment -- Hollywood style. Citizen-soldiers outfitted in camouflage-green fatigues, flak jackets and Kevlar helmets, and bearing M-16 A-2 semi-automatic rifles, raced through a parking area crammed with tanks, trucks and Humvees while being tailed by more than 50 television, radio and newspaper reporters.Without even leaving their armory compound, the California National Guard managed to act out a demonstration of force yesterday.It was a performance with a purpose: To deter those who might take to the streets and stage another riot in the wake of the jury's impending verdict in the Rodney G. King civil rights trial.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | May 3, 1992
Rosetta Stith, principal of Baltimore's Paquin School for pregnant teen-agers, delivers a relentlessly positive message to her predominantly black group of 300 girls.But last week, in the wake of the Rodney King verdict and the Los Angeles riots, she was angry and distressed."One girl said, 'Even though it's Rodney King they beat, it's still me and I'm black. What does it mean to me if I have a son?' " Dr. Stith said. "We really haven't gone as far as we thought we had. The bus has just barely moved, as far as I'm concerned."
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | May 2, 1992
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke climbed onto a park bench outside City Hall yesterday and implored an agitated crowd of college students: Don't turn Baltimore into another Los Angeles.Speaking through a bullhorn, the mayor tried to calm about 200 students who had come to City Hall to protest the Rodney King verdict. A few students appeared eager to disrupt the peaceful protest."I feel the pain that everybody feels," Mr. Schmoke said. "We lost in Los Angeles. But we don't need to lose anymore."He called the King verdict a "travesty of justice."
NEWS
By Ashley Dunn and Shawn Hubler and Ashley Dunn and Shawn Hubler,Los Angeles Times | July 6, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- In years to come, when historians examine the roots of the Los Angeles riots of 1992, they will be led not to the city's most desperate housing projects, but to neighborhoods of manicured lawns, weekend barbecues and unbarred windows.And when they sift through police records for the first documented act of violence, they will find not the armed hand of a gangster or gang member, but the raised fist of a 19-year-old store clerk who was so enraged at the Rodney King verdict that he uncharacteristically hurled a rock at a white motorist.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,Staff Writer | May 3, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Jackie Gilmer stood before the crowd sitting in the pews last night at the First Baptist Church, her voice shaking as she spoke."I feel Rodney King's fury," she said. "When the verdict came down, I cried. It really hurt me. The only difference between Rodney King and myself is there was a video camera to record what happened."Ms. Gilmer told the crowd about a beating she said she received at the hands of a police officer 2 1/2 years ago. Then she related her account of four officers surrounding a handcuffed man and one of them beating him with a club.
NEWS
By TOM TEEPEN | May 1, 1992
Atlanta -- This time, most African-Americans thought, whites finally would understand what blacks had been trying to tell them all these years. The videotape was so horrifying, its testimony so compelling that surely no jury could deny the plain evidence of its eyes.But the jury did precisely that. One of the jurors who acquitted four Los Angeles policemen for beating an obstreperous motorist to a pulp insisted, astoundingly, that the brutalized Rodney King had actually been in control all the time; that, in effect, he was directing his own victimization.
NEWS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | May 3, 1992
As the worst urban rioting since the 1960s unfolded in Los Angeles, subscribers to the nation's online services pitched in with eyewitness accounts, local news updates and tips on which neighborhoods to avoid -- and which routes to take to safety.Like other online services, GEnie, which has about 300,000 subscribers nationwide, set up an electronic bulletin board Wednesday when the Rodney King verdict was returned. The bulletin board, which allows any subscribers to swap messages with other subscribers, has been swamped ever since, said Laura Staley, product manager for Rockville-based GEnie.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and John Rivera and Bill Glauber and John Rivera,Staff Writers | April 12, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- They were 20 minutes and three encores into "Great Day," the church shaking with the sound of gospel music and the rumble of stomping feet and clapping hands.The Rev. Cecil L. Murray of the First African Methodist Episcopal Church was smiling now, looking to the dozens of children sitting on the steps to the pulpit, looking to the 2,500 worshipers who jammed nearly every inch of the sanctuary, looking, too, at television cameras lined against the walls.Finally, he was ready to speak yesterday about the best and the worst of Los Angeles as the city anxiously awaited the jury's verdict in the federal trial of four policemen charged with violating the civil rights of Rodney G. King.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and John Rivera and Dan Fesperman and John Rivera,Staff Writers | April 10, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- From the moment he hears the verdict, Richard Rhee will stand at his market in Koreatown and begin looking south, to where all the trouble began a year ago. He will watch for the first inky plume of smoke to rise above the smog into the blue California sky. Then he will prepare for war."I'll shut it [the market] down," he says. "Then I'll barricade my parking lot with whatever I can -- my car, trucks, rice pallets. Then I'll get my boys together."His boys, about 40 to 60 of them, will be well-equipped.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | November 20, 1992
Morgan State University: Sixty-nine football players sign a petition to demand their coach be fired.South Carolina: A tense team meeting reaches a crescendo when one player rises and asks for the coach's resignation.Memphis State: Eighty-four of 100 players boycott a practice after the coach publicly blames the players for three consecutive losses.The times most definitely are a changin' in college football, a sport once shaped by iron-fisted coaches yet now rattled by sporadic player insurrections in nearly every corner of the country.
NEWS
By Ashley Dunn and Shawn Hubler and Ashley Dunn and Shawn Hubler,Los Angeles Times | July 6, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- In years to come, when historians examine the roots of the Los Angeles riots of 1992, they will be led not to the city's most desperate housing projects, but to neighborhoods of manicured lawns, weekend barbecues and unbarred windows.And when they sift through police records for the first documented act of violence, they will find not the armed hand of a gangster or gang member, but the raised fist of a 19-year-old store clerk who was so enraged at the Rodney King verdict that he uncharacteristically hurled a rock at a white motorist.
NEWS
May 19, 1992
Poor man's wageLet's see: Alan Keyes made over $200,000 a year for the last couple of years and now claims he has no assets other than his house, which has a mortgage on it.That's why he needs $8,500 a month to meet expenses or he'll have to live on the street and sleep in homeless shelters?Is this the kind of fiscal responsibility we should expect if Senator Keyes were to get his hands on taxpayers' money?Brian D. TaylorBaltimoreLA's fuse was lit long before King verdictHaving lived in Los Angeles for the past 10 years (June 1982 through March 1992)
NEWS
By Roger Twigg and Roger Twigg,Staff Writer | May 15, 1992
Former U.S. Attorney General Edwin Meese last night accused public officials who criticized the verdict in the Rodney King police brutality case of pouring "gas on the flames" rather than trying to ease tensions that led to rioting in Los Angeles two weeks ago.Mr. Meese said that the criticisms created "an atmosphere that appeared to justify the type of disorders that took place [in Los Angeles] and elsewhere in the United States.""It [the rioting] should not have happened," he said in a speech before the National Troopers Coalition,which is meeting at the BWI-Holiday Inn in Linthicum.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Staff Writer Staff writers John Rivera, Sandra A. Crockett, Sandy Banisky, Scott Shane, M. Dion Thompson, James Bock, Michael Fletcher and Alisa Samuels contributed to this article | May 1, 1992
For many whites, the Rodney King verdict revealed an ugly reality they ordinarily do not confront. For blacks, it confirmed a humiliating injustice they cannot escape.For once, though, the races in Maryland yesterday seemed to share the same viewpoint."If it had been a white man," concluded Debbie Nyborg, a 41-year-old white woman from Forest Hill, "I honestly think it would have been a guilty verdict."That's sad, but unfortunately, I think it's true."The events in California seemed to compel Marylanders to look unsparingly at the country's racial wounds.
NEWS
By David N. Dinkins | May 6, 1992
New York -- WITH A trembling voice and his face tormented by the hateful aftermath of an unjust verdict, Rodney King spoke to, and for, us all. He told us simply and poignantly that the violence must end, and that we must work this out together.As the flames rose in Los Angeles, dust from the city's ashes fell on each of us. We deplored the violence but understood the outburst of a city filled with pain and despair.The fires have stopped, but the destruction will take generations to fully repair.
NEWS
By David N. Dinkins | May 6, 1992
New York -- WITH A trembling voice and his face tormented by the hateful aftermath of an unjust verdict, Rodney King spoke to, and for, us all. He told us simply and poignantly that the violence must end, and that we must work this out together.As the flames rose in Los Angeles, dust from the city's ashes fell on each of us. We deplored the violence but understood the outburst of a city filled with pain and despair.The fires have stopped, but the destruction will take generations to fully repair.
NEWS
May 6, 1992
I was stunned and outraged by the acquittal of the police officers in the brutal beating of Rodney King. Hopefully, this tragedy will create an awareness of the violence that the government can inflict on its people and of the fragility of our basic rights as American citizens.The situation in U.S. cities has deteriorated to the point where radical measures are necessary to save them. Not to undertake this will end up costing billions in drug treatment, law enforcement and jails.Sending troops -- while perhaps temporarily necessary -- is not a long-term solution for the problems that face this country.
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