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by Jordan Bartel | jordan@bthesite.com and b free daily | February 19, 2010
This week, we discovered that renting the makes-you-too-scared-to-go-outdoors "Cabin Fever" is not the best way to get over cabin fever. So instead we spent our time collecting the best stories pop culture threw down. Here's our week in review: MOST WELCOME RETURN: Sade, which sold 500K copies of comeback album Soldier of Love in its first week. Also, we learned that Sade is the name of the band and not just the lead singer, a fact that eluded us for 20 years. BEST THING WE SAW ALL WEEK: Photo essay "How to properly enjoy Ed Hardy wine" on thechive.
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ENTERTAINMENT
by Jordan Bartel | jordan@bthesite.com and b free daily | February 19, 2010
This week, we discovered that renting the makes-you-too-scared-to-go-outdoors "Cabin Fever" is not the best way to get over cabin fever. So instead we spent our time collecting the best stories pop culture threw down. Here's our week in review: MOST WELCOME RETURN: Sade, which sold 500K copies of comeback album Soldier of Love in its first week. Also, we learned that Sade is the name of the band and not just the lead singer, a fact that eluded us for 20 years. BEST THING WE SAW ALL WEEK: Photo essay "How to properly enjoy Ed Hardy wine" on thechive.
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NEWS
By CHARLYNE VARKONYI SCHAUB and CHARLYNE VARKONYI SCHAUB,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | October 16, 2005
King Tut fever has infected the world of design. Get ready for everything from pharaoh heads to sarcophagus storage. Egyptian has become the motif du jour, inspired by Tutankamum and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs, a four-city traveling exhibit. The boy king may seem an unlikely design muse, but he has proven to be an inspiration since his burial chamber was discovered in 1922. The result back then was a worldwide craze for Egyptian design. He inspired decor from the grave again in the late 1970s with "The Treasure of Tutankhamun" exhibit.
TRAVEL
By Geoff Gehman and Mariella Savidge and Geoff Gehman and Mariella Savidge,Morning Call | February 18, 2007
PHILADELPHIA / / The boy king's burial bling is back for another fling. Golden treasures from the tomb of Tutankhamun, who ruled ancient Egypt from ages 9 to 19, are touring the United States for the first time since the late 1970s, when Tut mania had visitors camping overnight outside museums and Steve Martin danced the Tut watusi on Saturday Night Live. Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs, an exhibition of 130 objects from the final resting places of King Tut and other royal relatives in the 18th Dynasty (1555 B.C. to 1305 B.C.)
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1997
Baltimore police have raided a downtown jewelry shop as part of a two-year investigation into stolen and cloned cellular phones, and investigators said yesterday employees of the store are under investigation by a grand jury.On Feb. 7, city police searched King Tut Jewelers in the 300 block of N. Howard St. after an undercover Bell Atlantic investigator said he bought a stolen cellular phone there. The investigator said he was told to go to another business across the street to have it cloned -- reprogrammed with a stolen phone number.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gary Vikan and Gary Vikan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 30, 2000
My impressions this summer on a first trip to Egypt were mostly of the usual sort: pyramids (and temples, too) out of scale with anything human, an unrelenting sun dictating still, as for millennia, the tempo of each day, and everywhere the press of bodies. But perhaps unusually, the Sphinx left me less with a feeling of timelessness and awe than with a sense of impending disaster - of the imminent collision of the now with the forever. This huge, mutilated face, which has stared silently and mostly alone into nearly 5000 years of sunrises, now watches daily the inexorable advance across the Nile of a chaotic modern city, Cairo, that has more than doubled in size in my lifetime, to 15 million.
NEWS
May 13, 2005
A mummy `comes alive': King Tut CAIRO, Egypt - The first facial reconstructions of King Tutankhamen based on CT scans of his mummy have produced images strikingly similar to the boy pharaoh's ancient portraits, with one model showing a baby-faced young man with chubby cheeks and his family's characteristic overbite. That model, a photo of which was released Tuesday, bears a strong resemblance to the gold mask of King Tut found in his tomb in 1922 by the British excavation led by Howard Carter.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff writer | February 28, 1992
King Ramses II was there. Matthew Henson was there. King Tut, Harriet Tubman and George Carruthers also came.The famous and not so famous were on display yesterday at Meade Heights Elementary, as students put on "a living museum of black history."About 75 fourth-, fifth- and sixth-graders dressed in period costumes to show the life and works of blacks throughout history. Tour guides led the school's kindergarten through third-grade students through the museum -- which had once been the school's gym.The tour began with ancient leaders from Africa.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | March 31, 1993
No team ever brought more smiles to a ballpark than the Indianapolis Clowns, a vista from the past, gone but hardly forgotten, and put out of business when the color barricade was lifted by Major League Baseball. Meet Jim "Fireball" Cohen, who spent seven years of his life touring America with the Clowns, or as he says, "any place they had a ballpark."The Clowns were the most widely traveled organization in the history of baseball, the Harlem Globetrotters in knickers. In most seasons they were on the road for 175 dates, making more barnstorming stops in towns and villages than official contests in the Negro American League.
TRAVEL
By Geoff Gehman and Mariella Savidge and Geoff Gehman and Mariella Savidge,Morning Call | February 18, 2007
PHILADELPHIA / / The boy king's burial bling is back for another fling. Golden treasures from the tomb of Tutankhamun, who ruled ancient Egypt from ages 9 to 19, are touring the United States for the first time since the late 1970s, when Tut mania had visitors camping overnight outside museums and Steve Martin danced the Tut watusi on Saturday Night Live. Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs, an exhibition of 130 objects from the final resting places of King Tut and other royal relatives in the 18th Dynasty (1555 B.C. to 1305 B.C.)
NEWS
By CHARLYNE VARKONYI SCHAUB and CHARLYNE VARKONYI SCHAUB,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | October 16, 2005
King Tut fever has infected the world of design. Get ready for everything from pharaoh heads to sarcophagus storage. Egyptian has become the motif du jour, inspired by Tutankamum and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs, a four-city traveling exhibit. The boy king may seem an unlikely design muse, but he has proven to be an inspiration since his burial chamber was discovered in 1922. The result back then was a worldwide craze for Egyptian design. He inspired decor from the grave again in the late 1970s with "The Treasure of Tutankhamun" exhibit.
NEWS
May 13, 2005
A mummy `comes alive': King Tut CAIRO, Egypt - The first facial reconstructions of King Tutankhamen based on CT scans of his mummy have produced images strikingly similar to the boy pharaoh's ancient portraits, with one model showing a baby-faced young man with chubby cheeks and his family's characteristic overbite. That model, a photo of which was released Tuesday, bears a strong resemblance to the gold mask of King Tut found in his tomb in 1922 by the British excavation led by Howard Carter.
FEATURES
By Andrew Marton and Andrew Marton,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 12, 2003
In the market for all that is both cerebral and zany about Steve Martin? Look no further than his latest movie. Bringing Down the House, which opened last weekend, acts as a two-hour showcase for - and much needed reminder of - Martin's flair for carefully choreographed word-play and off-the-cuff lunacy. But, of course, that's nothing new. For more than 30 years now, Martin has toggled back and forth between playing the uptight, put-upon, suburban white guy, and some seriously "wild and crazy" guys, either spewing absurdist plays on words or engaging in some of the most inspired physical comedy this side of Buster Keaton.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gary Vikan and Gary Vikan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 30, 2000
My impressions this summer on a first trip to Egypt were mostly of the usual sort: pyramids (and temples, too) out of scale with anything human, an unrelenting sun dictating still, as for millennia, the tempo of each day, and everywhere the press of bodies. But perhaps unusually, the Sphinx left me less with a feeling of timelessness and awe than with a sense of impending disaster - of the imminent collision of the now with the forever. This huge, mutilated face, which has stared silently and mostly alone into nearly 5000 years of sunrises, now watches daily the inexorable advance across the Nile of a chaotic modern city, Cairo, that has more than doubled in size in my lifetime, to 15 million.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1997
Baltimore police have raided a downtown jewelry shop as part of a two-year investigation into stolen and cloned cellular phones, and investigators said yesterday employees of the store are under investigation by a grand jury.On Feb. 7, city police searched King Tut Jewelers in the 300 block of N. Howard St. after an undercover Bell Atlantic investigator said he bought a stolen cellular phone there. The investigator said he was told to go to another business across the street to have it cloned -- reprogrammed with a stolen phone number.
NEWS
By CINDY PARR | May 17, 1993
With the weather turning warmer and the end of the school year just around the corner, many families are anxiously making plans for their summer vacations.For some, it may be a trip to the beach, seeing the sights in a place of special interest or a relaxing visit to the home of a close relative.Whatever the adventure, it is a special time because it gives families the opportunity to be together and make memories that will last a lifetime.Westminster resident Carol Richardson is among the many folks who are looking forward to a very special vacation this summer.
NEWS
By CINDY PARR | May 17, 1993
With the weather turning warmer and the end of the school year just around the corner, many families are anxiously making plans for their summer vacations.For some, it may be a trip to the beach, seeing the sights in a place of special interest or a relaxing visit to the home of a close relative.Whatever the adventure, it is a special time because it gives families the opportunity to be together and make memories that will last a lifetime.Westminster resident Carol Richardson is among the many folks who are looking forward to a very special vacation this summer.
FEATURES
By Andrew Marton and Andrew Marton,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 12, 2003
In the market for all that is both cerebral and zany about Steve Martin? Look no further than his latest movie. Bringing Down the House, which opened last weekend, acts as a two-hour showcase for - and much needed reminder of - Martin's flair for carefully choreographed word-play and off-the-cuff lunacy. But, of course, that's nothing new. For more than 30 years now, Martin has toggled back and forth between playing the uptight, put-upon, suburban white guy, and some seriously "wild and crazy" guys, either spewing absurdist plays on words or engaging in some of the most inspired physical comedy this side of Buster Keaton.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | March 31, 1993
No team ever brought more smiles to a ballpark than the Indianapolis Clowns, a vista from the past, gone but hardly forgotten, and put out of business when the color barricade was lifted by Major League Baseball. Meet Jim "Fireball" Cohen, who spent seven years of his life touring America with the Clowns, or as he says, "any place they had a ballpark."The Clowns were the most widely traveled organization in the history of baseball, the Harlem Globetrotters in knickers. In most seasons they were on the road for 175 dates, making more barnstorming stops in towns and villages than official contests in the Negro American League.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff writer | February 28, 1992
King Ramses II was there. Matthew Henson was there. King Tut, Harriet Tubman and George Carruthers also came.The famous and not so famous were on display yesterday at Meade Heights Elementary, as students put on "a living museum of black history."About 75 fourth-, fifth- and sixth-graders dressed in period costumes to show the life and works of blacks throughout history. Tour guides led the school's kindergarten through third-grade students through the museum -- which had once been the school's gym.The tour began with ancient leaders from Africa.
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