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King S Dream

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By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | January 17, 1993
The preacher's words urging blacks to do more to fulfill Martin Luther King Jr.'s dream brought almost 600 people to their feet yesterday at a Westminster breakfast honoring the slain civil rights leader."
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | January 20, 2008
You want to know who deserves credit for the victories of the civil rights movement? Mother Pollard. She's been largely forgotten over the last two weeks as the leading contenders for the Democratic presidential nomination bickered over who did what in the 13-year epoch that crumbled the walls of American apartheid. Should the lion's share of the recognition go to the president who staked his legacy on enacting laws that made real the promises of democracy? Should it go to the civil rights leader whose courage and eloquence roused the sleeping conscience of the nation?
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | January 20, 2008
You want to know who deserves credit for the victories of the civil rights movement? Mother Pollard. She's been largely forgotten over the last two weeks as the leading contenders for the Democratic presidential nomination bickered over who did what in the 13-year epoch that crumbled the walls of American apartheid. Should the lion's share of the recognition go to the president who staked his legacy on enacting laws that made real the promises of democracy? Should it go to the civil rights leader whose courage and eloquence roused the sleeping conscience of the nation?
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | January 19, 2007
Jason McCoy, principal of Cradlerock School in Columbia, opened the school's Tuesday morning program honoring the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. by opening a folder and reverently taking out a large black-and-white photograph. "This is Dr. King, shaking my grandfather's hand," said McCoy, 38. "My grandfather worked in Pittsburgh with the civil rights movement. This is a piece of my history." It was the classic "teachable moment." McCoy had a similar teachable moment when he was in the third grade, after attending a King assembly in school.
NEWS
By PHYLLIS FLOWERS AND PHYLLIS LUCAS | January 18, 1993
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. devoted his entire life to God and peaceful living in a non-violent society. A peaceful, loving world is still only a dream, particularly with the threat of war hovering over us, drug wars all around us and senseless killings everywhere.It gives us a glimmer of hope to remember that there were and still are many good people in our country, state and community who continue to struggle with the same issues.Whether you have the day off or must work, you should take a moment to remember what Dr. King's dream was -- equality, peace and harmony in a very diverse society.
NEWS
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2005
Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele, For 25 years, parishioners of West Baltimore's New All Saints Roman Catholic Congregation have gathered for a Mass and breakfast honoring the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., and the tradition continued yesterday when speakers including Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele shared fellowship and home-style food with hundreds of members. "It represents true brotherhood and sisterhood," said Catherine Adams, 72, a lifelong member who was baptized and married at the church. "The fact that we can come together and celebrate the life of a man who believed so strongly in that very thing ... we're honored as a parish," Adams said.
NEWS
January 21, 1991
This year, as the nation observes the birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the clamor of war threatens to drown the message of peace, nonviolence and human understanding -- the message to which King dedicated his life. Yet even in happier times, there are always competing noises to distract the world from the quest for peace. On this imperfect planet, peace -- among nations and among people -- is always threatened somehow, somewhere. There are always reasons to despair that goodwill and understanding will triumph over violence, prejudice and hatred or the fear that breeds them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,Sun Staff | January 11, 2004
To the Mountaintop: Martin Luther King Jr.'s Sacred Mission to Save America, 1955-1968, by Stewart Burns. HarperSanFrancisco. 512 pages. $27.95. Like the Civil War, the Civil Rights Movement is one of the great touchstones of American history, attracting dozens of writers, biographers and memoirists. Over time, familiar material gets plowed over again and again, sometimes with precious little that is new. Such is the case with To The Mountaintop. We have read this story before, have seen it before.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Staff Writer | January 1, 1993
Twelve fifth-graders from city schools will receive savings bonds and other gifts as winners of a poster and essay contest honoring the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.More than 500 students are expected to attend the award ceremony which will be held Thursday at Harford Heights Elementary School. The contest was sponsored by the Prudential Health Care Plan.Students used a part of the "I Have a Dream" speech to write essays and create posters about their personal vision of Dr. King's dream.A team of 10 city schoolteachers and community leaders selected the essay and poster categories from the 200 entries received.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | January 16, 1995
The life of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. will take center stage at The Mall in Columbia today in a memorial event intended to evoke the spirit of the slain civil rights leader.The Howard County Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday Commission is sponsoring the free celebration from noon to 4 p.m. in the mall's center stage area. The Howard County Children's Chorus, Mount View Jazz Ensemble, Chinese Language School and Next Door Neighbors, a puppet group from Virginia, are expected to perform.
NEWS
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2005
Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele, For 25 years, parishioners of West Baltimore's New All Saints Roman Catholic Congregation have gathered for a Mass and breakfast honoring the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., and the tradition continued yesterday when speakers including Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele shared fellowship and home-style food with hundreds of members. "It represents true brotherhood and sisterhood," said Catherine Adams, 72, a lifelong member who was baptized and married at the church. "The fact that we can come together and celebrate the life of a man who believed so strongly in that very thing ... we're honored as a parish," Adams said.
TOPIC
By Jonathan Tilove and Jonathan Tilove,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 16, 2005
In September 1963, Martin Luther King Jr. delivered the eulogy for three of the four girls killed in the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala. What King could not know was that within earshot of the blast, just blocks away at her father's church, was another little black girl, a friend of the youngest victim, who 42 years later would be on the verge of becoming America's foremost diplomat. This year, the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday, marking what would have been his 76th birthday, is tomorrow.
NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 12, 2005
With booming voices and determined looks on their faces, two Cradlerock School pupils who delivered the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech worked to convey the same conviction as the slain civil rights leader did more than 40 years ago. William Achukwu and Haikeem Johnson, both 12, practiced the text Monday for a school assembly that will be held at 8:30 a.m. tomorrow for pupils and at 7 p.m. for the public. The program coincides with the national holiday Monday, celebrating King's life.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2004
Actress and activist Cicely Tyson spoke yesterday of Martin Luther King Jr.'s famed dream of racial harmony before a full house of 500 during the Johns Hopkins medical campus' 22nd annual celebration of King's birthday. The screen actress - who starred in Sounder, Roots, and The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman - was the keynote speaker at the event in Turner Auditorium on the Johns Hopkins Medicine campus, one of the nation's oldest observances of the slain civil rights leader's birthday.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2004
The lines that clearly separated black and white America in the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s time "have grown almost imperceptible today," Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele told a Howard County commemoration of the slain civil rights leader yesterday. But the blurring of racial lines doesn't mean that King's goals have been realized, Steele said, as economic and political divisions now keep groups apart. "While it's still about race," it's also about other issues, such as jobs, he said. Steele said he may have been the first African-American elected to statewide office, "but it took 300 years for it to happen."
ENTERTAINMENT
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,Sun Staff | January 11, 2004
To the Mountaintop: Martin Luther King Jr.'s Sacred Mission to Save America, 1955-1968, by Stewart Burns. HarperSanFrancisco. 512 pages. $27.95. Like the Civil War, the Civil Rights Movement is one of the great touchstones of American history, attracting dozens of writers, biographers and memoirists. Over time, familiar material gets plowed over again and again, sometimes with precious little that is new. Such is the case with To The Mountaintop. We have read this story before, have seen it before.
NEWS
By CARL O. SNOWDEN | January 16, 1994
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was born on Jan. 15, 1929. He was assassinated on April 4, 1968. This great civil rights leader, who has been called the non-violent warrior, took America on a journey for racial equality. In 13 years, he took us from Montgomery to Memphis. He was able to provide us with a leadership that was both challenging and non-threatening. . . .In 1955, who would have thought that a 26-year-old Baptist minister, who said to his people during the Montgomery bus boycott "it is better that we walk in dignity than ride in shame," would become a Nobel Peace Prize winner in 1964?
NEWS
By Ron Walters | January 19, 1998
AS we celebrate the federal holiday in honor of the late Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. today, it is natural to consider how he is being interpreted now, and what he would be doing if he were alive today.Surprisingly, in the public debate over social policy, King's words seem to be used more by conservatives than liberals.For example, the famous line from King's ''I Have a Dream'' speech, about the necessity of people being judged by the ''content of their character,'' not the color of their skin, has been appropriated by some on the right to argue against affirmative action.
NEWS
By Carl O. Snowden | January 20, 2003
FOUR LITTLE words, "I have a dream," captured the imagination of the nation. As we observe today the birth 74 years ago of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., many will hear again his "I Have a Dream" speech. This year will mark the 40th anniversary of the Aug. 28, 1963 March on Washington where he made that speech. Its power still resonates with anyone over 40. It is one of the greatest speeches ever recorded in American history. I was 10 in 1963 and grew up in the segregated city of Annapolis.
NEWS
January 20, 2003
NEARLY 40 years after the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. shared with his countrymen the dream of a colorblind America, the national conversation is once again about race. Affirmative action. Racial profiling. Bias in the death penalty. Judicial insensitivity. Trent Lott. Michael Steele. Obviously, much progress has been made since that sweltering day in August 1963 when Dr. King gave perhaps his most famous speech before 200,000 at the Lincoln Memorial. Progress in open housing, public accommodations, voting rights.
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