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By LEONARD PITTS JR | February 5, 2006
WASHINGTON -- I interviewed Coretta Scott King once. It cost $5,000. In 1985, I approached the King Center in Atlanta seeking both that interview and permission to use old audio of Mrs. King's husband, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., for a radio documentary. I was told it would cost five grand for the audio rights, and it was made clear that unless that money was paid, there would be no interview. The ethical constraints of a radio production house are different from those of a news organization; we made the deal.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 9, 2014
"I won't have any money to leave behind. I won't have the fine and luxurious things of life to leave behind. But I just want to leave a committed life behind. " --  Martin Luther King Jr., Feb. 4, 1968 Maybe we should take up an offering. Obviously, the heirs of Martin Luther King Jr. are hard up for money. That must be why they keep selling off pieces of his legacy. Have you heard the latest? King's youngest child, Bernice, issued a statement last week after her brothers, Dexter and Martin III, filed suit to force her to turn over their father's Nobel Peace Prize and his traveling Bible.
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NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 16, 1999
WASHINGTON -- It has been a season of tumult for those who would guard the legacy of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. -- and things are only promising to get more contentious.This month, a federal commission approved a 4-acre site for a memorial on the Washington Mall to the slain civil rights leader, to take its place among the tributes to the nation's heroes.And a civil jury in Memphis sided with hotly disputed arguments made by the King family's lawyers, finding that a broad-gauged conspiracy was involved in his assassination.
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By Karen Nitkin, knitkin@verizon.net | October 11, 2011
Crab Shanty, a family-owned Ellicott City landmark since 1978, is changing its menu, its look, even its name. "The changes had to happen," said William C. King III, who founded the restaurant with his father, William King Jr. "We have to attract a different clientele to stay in business. " Work began earlier this month and is expected to continue through early November. Outdoor seating will be added, the bar area will be made larger, and new colors, chairs and lighting will brighten the inside.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | April 5, 2007
An elderly Maryland woman who grew up in the same neighborhood as the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. wants to sell 25 of the civil rights leader's writings through an Atlanta auction house, an action that King's heirs say they will fight. The woman does not want to be identified, said Paul Brown, owner of Gallery 63, a consignment arm of the auction house Red Baron. Reached on a cruise ship yesterday in the Caribbean, Brown said the auction is set for April 15. The news was first reported in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution on Tuesday.
NEWS
August 10, 2003
On August 6, 2003, LEWIS E. WAGNER beloved husband of the late Mary King Wagner, long time friend and companion of Lois F. Franklin. Also survived by members of the King family and the Flickinger family. Services are private. If so desired contributions may be made to the American Heart Society.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 29, 1994
ATLANTA -- The tomb and birthplace of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., the most popular tourist attraction in Atlanta, may be visible only from a distance if a long-running feud between the National Park Service and the King family is not resolved.After a 14-year partnership designed to share Dr, King's legacy through guided tours, his family has ordered the Park Service off the property, and has no plan of its own, so far, to give guided tours."You are to remove all Park Services personnel and property by the close of business Dec. 28, 1994," wrote Sonny Walker, executive director of the Martin Luther King Center for Non-Violent Social Change, in a letter to the Park Service dated Friday.
NEWS
By STEPHEN KIEHL and STEPHEN KIEHL,SUN REPORTER | February 1, 2006
Coretta Scott King, a pioneer of the civil rights movement who marched alongside her husband, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., in the fight for equality and carried his torch for nearly four decades after his death, died early yesterday in Mexico. She was 78. In a statement, the King family said Mrs. King was seeking treatment for ovarian cancer at a holistic hospital in Rosarito, Mexico. The family said doctors in the United States had declared her cancer terminal and the family wanted to explore alternative treatments.
NEWS
April 24, 1998
HE SLEW the dreamer. Or so it was said of James Earl Ray, convicted of murder in the 1968 slaying of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. But Ray, who died a prisoner Thursday after years of suffering from hepatitis, claimed he wasn't the one.He confessed to the crime to avoid capital punishment, but within days recanted. Nonetheless, no trial occurred.The death of Ray probably means the questions he continued to raise about Dr. King's death will never be answered. That is a blow that will be felt most by the King family, which, in recent months, announced that it believed Ray and joined his unsuccessful effort to receive a trial.
EXPLORE
June 24, 2011
Hope Baptist Church, in North Laurel, honored Waldo King by naming him deacon emeritus June 12. Waldo and his wife, Muriel King, have been members of Hope Baptist since 2005. Waldo King was presented with a plaque and the King family was honored at a luncheon following the worship service. Waldo and Muriel King were married in December 1945. Waldo was in the Army and stationed in Maine where he met Muriel before leaving for service in Europe. Muriel joined the Navy WAVES and was stationed in Washington during the war. Afterwards they were married and lived in Washington, Greenbelt and College Park.
NEWS
August 29, 2011
Sunday marks the 48th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.'s historic "I have a dream" speech, delivered on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, and if not for Hurricane Irene, the day would have seen another mass gathering on the National Mall and another round of speeches, this time a gathering to honor his enduring legacy. Whenever the official dedication of the King memorial takes place - organizers think sometime this fall - the speeches by members of the King family, President Barack Obama and leaders from across the country will draw deserved national attention on the character and accomplishments of one of the great figures of 20th century America.
EXPLORE
June 24, 2011
Hope Baptist Church, in North Laurel, honored Waldo King by naming him deacon emeritus June 12. Waldo and his wife, Muriel King, have been members of Hope Baptist since 2005. Waldo King was presented with a plaque and the King family was honored at a luncheon following the worship service. Waldo and Muriel King were married in December 1945. Waldo was in the Army and stationed in Maine where he met Muriel before leaving for service in Europe. Muriel joined the Navy WAVES and was stationed in Washington during the war. Afterwards they were married and lived in Washington, Greenbelt and College Park.
NEWS
By Valerie J. Nelson | May 17, 2007
LOS ANGELES -- Yolanda King, an actress, producer and motivational speaker who was the eldest child of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and who turned to the performing arts to carry on her father's civil rights legacy, has died. She was 51. Ms. King died late Tuesday in Santa Monica, said Steve Klein, a spokesman for the King Center in Atlanta. According to Klein, family members suspected her death could be related to a heart problem, but he provided no additional details. In a statement, the King family called her an "advocate for peace and nonviolence, who was known and loved for her motivational and inspirational contributions to society."
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | April 5, 2007
An elderly Maryland woman who grew up in the same neighborhood as the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. wants to sell 25 of the civil rights leader's writings through an Atlanta auction house, an action that King's heirs say they will fight. The woman does not want to be identified, said Paul Brown, owner of Gallery 63, a consignment arm of the auction house Red Baron. Reached on a cruise ship yesterday in the Caribbean, Brown said the auction is set for April 15. The news was first reported in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution on Tuesday.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun staff | September 3, 2006
When a coalition of Atlanta business leaders and philanthropists pledged to purchase 7,000 pages of the private papers of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in June for $32 million, its efforts were hailed by many as a step toward preserving an important chapter of American - and Atlanta - history. The collection, which was headed for the auction block at Sotheby's, serves as a virtual timeline - for the civil rights movement, the turbulent 1960s and King's personal life. The agreement, which lets Morehouse College house the documents in a library it shares with three other schools, spared the papers from possible purchase by a private collector.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 9, 2006
ATLANTA --After years of trying to sell the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s archives to a library or university, the King family will instead put them up for auction on June 30, Sotheby's announced yesterday. The sale, expected to bring $15 million to $30 million, will take place exactly five months after the death of Coretta Scott King, King's widow, who was keenly interested in finding an institutional home for the papers. The buyer will determine the future accessibility of the papers.
EXPLORE
By Karen Nitkin, knitkin@verizon.net | October 11, 2011
Crab Shanty, a family-owned Ellicott City landmark since 1978, is changing its menu, its look, even its name. "The changes had to happen," said William C. King III, who founded the restaurant with his father, William King Jr. "We have to attract a different clientele to stay in business. " Work began earlier this month and is expected to continue through early November. Outdoor seating will be added, the bar area will be made larger, and new colors, chairs and lighting will brighten the inside.
NEWS
By ROBERT LITTLE and ROBERT LITTLE,SUN REPORTER | February 1, 2006
As civil rights leaders and politicians heralded the life and accomplishments of Coretta Scott King yesterday, one of her more prominent brick-and-mortar legacies was suspended in a state of controversy and disrepair. The King Center in Atlanta, founded by Mrs. King in 1968 to further the struggle and the ideals of her murdered husband, is more than $11 million behind on maintenance, including leaks where some of Martin Luther King Jr.'s historic papers are stored. Rather than promoting Dr. King's message, its most conspicuous public role in recent years has been to serve as the arena in which King family members battle for control of - and profit from - their family history.
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS JR | February 5, 2006
WASHINGTON -- I interviewed Coretta Scott King once. It cost $5,000. In 1985, I approached the King Center in Atlanta seeking both that interview and permission to use old audio of Mrs. King's husband, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., for a radio documentary. I was told it would cost five grand for the audio rights, and it was made clear that unless that money was paid, there would be no interview. The ethical constraints of a radio production house are different from those of a news organization; we made the deal.
NEWS
By STEPHEN KIEHL and STEPHEN KIEHL,SUN REPORTER | February 1, 2006
Coretta Scott King, a pioneer of the civil rights movement who marched alongside her husband, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., in the fight for equality and carried his torch for nearly four decades after his death, died early yesterday in Mexico. She was 78. In a statement, the King family said Mrs. King was seeking treatment for ovarian cancer at a holistic hospital in Rosarito, Mexico. The family said doctors in the United States had declared her cancer terminal and the family wanted to explore alternative treatments.
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