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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | April 15, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- There is the often conflicting testimony of 61 witnesses spread across six weeks.There are police reports, radio transmissions and computer messages.And of course, there is the 81-second videotape, which was recorded in the early-morning hours of March 3, 1991, by a plumber named George Holliday.But even with that tape, the Rodney G. King civil rights trial defies a rush to judgment."The videotape simply doesn't give you the whole story," said Peter Arenella, a UCLA criminal law professor.
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NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | February 5, 1998
It's been three years since her husband was slain, but the hurt is still fresh for Tish King -- as fresh as her daily prayer that the killer will be caught.George King, 45, was working the midnight-to-8 a.m. shift at Prestige Messenger Service in Arbutus on Dec. 12, 1994, when a person or persons came in, robbed the company of 14 metal boxes that held coins for pay telephones, and shot him. His body was left behind a trash bin."You keep going and try to rebuild your world, but there are not enough pieces left to rebuild it," said Tish King, 43, of Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Penelope McMillan and Sheryl Stolberg and Penelope McMillan and Sheryl Stolberg,Los Angeles Times | May 14, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Prosecutors will seek a retrial of Officer Laurence M. Powell, the only one of four Los Angeles police officers who failed to win a Ventura County jury's total exoneration in the beating of motorist Rodney G. King.Declaring that "justice was not done in the Rodney King case," Los Angeles County District Attorney Ira Reiner said yesterday that prosecutors would make the request tomorrow before Superior Court Judge Stanley Weisberg.Judge Weisberg declared a mistrial April 29 after a Ventura County jury deadlocked on one count of assault under color of authority against Officer Powell.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 14, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court brought back to the limelight yesterday the celebrated case of the videotaped police beating of a black motorist in Los Angeles and raised the possibility that two convicted officers may have to return to prison to serve more time.In a decision that split the court three ways, the justices ruled that the two policemen were entitled to some credit -- time off their potential sentences -- for special circumstances in their case involving the battering of Rodney G. King five years ago.But it rejected other credits given by a federal judge and told the judge to reconsider the sentences of the police officers, Stacey C. Koon and Laurence M. Powell.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 25, 1991
THE LOS ANGELES Police Department deserves respect and support. It has fought hard against internal corruption, served as a virtual laboratory for testing many policing innovations and struggled, often courageously, against an increasing crime rate even though it has fewer officers per population density than most other major departments. . . .Under Chief Daryl F. Gates for the past 13 years, it has initiated improvements in urban policing that have been widely praised and in some cases emulated by other police departments.
NEWS
By Jerome H. Skolnick & James J. Fyfe | April 20, 1993
SATURDAY'S DRAMATIC verdicts in the Rodney King case marked the end of a terrible ordeal. But, from another perspective, the trial's conclusion is just a milepost in a far longer process. All four of the accused cops are broken financially and professionally, and are awaiting another day in court when they and the city of Los Angeles will once again face Rodney G. King in a civil trial. In the meantime, they will earn something by saving their stories for tabloid television where they will be paid.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | May 6, 1992
Washington. -- In our shock, we get myriad analyses of what went wrong, sermons about healing the racial and social wounds of this society, and all kinds of promises of panaceas that will ensure that ''this will not happen again.''Well, it will happen again unless politicians stop encouraging racial polarization and class strife and now appeal to people to be as decent as most Americans would like to be.Los Angeles was begging for this kind of blow-up. It has a laid-back, patrician black mayor of 19 years, Tom Bradley, and an arrogant white police chief of Third Reich mentality, Daryl Gates.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | May 1, 1992
You saw it yourself in black and white, albeit the grainy black and white of an amateurishly shot video, and like many, you perhaps thought you were seeing a clear-cut case of police brutality.But 12 jurors also saw that video, and their reaction was to exonerate the officers taped as they surrounded and clubbed Rodney King.How could a video have one effect on the so-called jury of public opinion and an apparently different one with the actual jury in the Simi Valley courtroom?"They didn't see the same video you saw," said Harvey Weitz, a New York-based attorney who analyzed the Rodney King case for the Courtroom TV network.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | May 1, 1992
You saw it yourself in black and white, albeit the grainy black and white of an amateurishly shot video, and like many, you perhaps thought you were seeing a clear-cut case of police brutality.But 12 jurors also saw that video, and their reaction was to acquit the officers taped as they surrounded and clubbed Rodney King.How could a video have one effect on the so-called jury of public opinion and an apparently different one with the actual jury in the Simi Valley courtroom?"They didn't see the same video you saw," said Harvey Weitz, a New York-based attorney who analyzed the Rodney King case for the Courtroom TV network.
NEWS
May 1, 1992
Law-enforcement authorities across the country, including Baltimore, should take the Rodney King case, and its aftermath, as a deadly warning.The acquittal of the four white policemen charged with beating Mr. King, a black motorist, does not mean police officers now have open season to use excessive force to subdue citizens they are trying to apprehend. On the contrary, this tragedy, recorded for all time on videotape, must be seen as a textbook example of what not to do.If police departments are not chastened, they should be. What happened to Mr. King should not happen to any citizen.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 4, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Still publicly unrepentant, the two police officers convicted in the beating of Rodney G. King on March 3, 1991, will hear their sentence today and by the end of the day could be behind bars for the first time.Since their conviction in April for violating Mr. King's civil rights, both Stacey C. Koon, who is 42, and Laurence M. Powell, 30, have repeated in strong terms their belief that they acted properly in the violent, videotaped beating that for many Americans has become a symbol of police brutality.
NEWS
By Jerome H. Skolnick & James J. Fyfe | April 20, 1993
SATURDAY'S DRAMATIC verdicts in the Rodney King case marked the end of a terrible ordeal. But, from another perspective, the trial's conclusion is just a milepost in a far longer process. All four of the accused cops are broken financially and professionally, and are awaiting another day in court when they and the city of Los Angeles will once again face Rodney G. King in a civil trial. In the meantime, they will earn something by saving their stories for tabloid television where they will be paid.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | April 19, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- For most of the past week, the kitchen table of Thesus Phelon's home in Jordan Downs -- a Watts housing project -- has been the national headquarters of the NAACP.The 22-year-old mother of three girls was host to Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis, the newly appointed executive director of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Mr. Chavis came to Jordan Downs to meet with the African-American community in preparation for the verdicts in the federal trial of the four officers accused of violating Rodney G. King's civil rights.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | April 19, 1993
Most people are feeling pretty good about the verdict in the Rodney King beating trial. Maybe too good.It was almost as if the jurors wanted to make everyone happy.If you think about it, the verdict offered something for just about everybody. Those who believe police are too often out of control got two convictions. Those who believe police face a tough job that many don't appreciate saw two cops go free. Most of all, L.A. avoided a riot.The jury did its job. Peace came to the land. And justice was done.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | April 15, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- There is the often conflicting testimony of 61 witnesses spread across six weeks.There are police reports, radio transmissions and computer messages.And of course, there is the 81-second videotape, which was recorded in the early-morning hours of March 3, 1991, by a plumber named George Holliday.But even with that tape, the Rodney G. King civil rights trial defies a rush to judgment."The videotape simply doesn't give you the whole story," said Peter Arenella, a UCLA criminal law professor.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | April 14, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Death threats? Ira Salzman said he stopped counting at 25.Telephone calls? Forget about it. He no longer answers the phone after his secretary logged 400 threating messages.Escape route? He has one mapped out from the Edward R. Roybal Federal Building after the jury reaches a verdict in the Rodney G. King civil rights trial."It's like a Dali painting," said Mr. Salzman, an attorney for Sgt. Stacey C. Koon, one of four defendants."The whole thing, the whole case, is unprecedented," Mr. Salzman said.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | February 5, 1998
It's been three years since her husband was slain, but the hurt is still fresh for Tish King -- as fresh as her daily prayer that the killer will be caught.George King, 45, was working the midnight-to-8 a.m. shift at Prestige Messenger Service in Arbutus on Dec. 12, 1994, when a person or persons came in, robbed the company of 14 metal boxes that held coins for pay telephones, and shot him. His body was left behind a trash bin."You keep going and try to rebuild your world, but there are not enough pieces left to rebuild it," said Tish King, 43, of Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Chuck Philips and Chuck Philips,Contributing Writer Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 9, 1993
Eazy-E, the controversial Los Angeles rapper once accused of advocating violence against police officers, confirms that he believes in the innocence of one of the four officers on trial in the Rodney King case -- shocking some members of the rap community."
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | April 13, 1993
Once again, 12 men and women have been asked to decide whether Rodney King deserved the beating he received in March 1991 at the hands of four Los Angeles police officers.Last spring, a jury weighed the evidence, including a videotape of the incident, and decided that, yes, Mr. King deserved to be kicked and clubbed and shocked with electronic stun guns. That jTC decision shocked the nation and led to one of the country's worst riots this century.Now, the setting has changed. The officers are being tried in a federal court under federal civil rights provisions rather than under the state criminal code.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | April 11, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- They are identified by numbers not names %% Eight are men, four are women. Nine are white, two are black and one is Hispanic. %%%% Among them is a Danish army veteran, an ex-Marine, a postal worker and a housewife.This is the jury that began deliberations yesterday on the fate of ++ four white police officers on trial in the videotaped beating of black motorist Rodney G. King.The six-week criminal trial ground down with an extraordinary Saturday session.A defense attorney and a prosecutor engaged in one last flurry of point-counterpoint arguments.
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