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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | May 12, 1992
By an eerie coincidence, the Maryland Stage Company's production of "Marat/Sade" opened the day after the jury's decision in the Rodney King case. Watching the asylum workers trying to subdue patients with clubs in the play, it was impossible to divorce the theatrical images from the repeatedly broadcast videotape of the King beating.Nor should such an effort even have been attempted. As is suggested by its unwieldly unabridged title -- "The Persecution and Assassination of Jean-Paul Marat as Performed by the Inmates of the Asylum of Charenton Under the Direction of the Marquis de Sade" -- Peter Weiss' drama is an examination of anarchy.
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NEWS
March 30, 1998
The stories of the Evers, King and Shabazz families ar entwined with the decades-long struggle to integrate American society. Over the next two days, the landmark events of those years will be chronicled.1975Jan. 24: The Washington Post reports that the FBI wiretapped Dr. King's phones during the 1964 Democratic National Convention.Feb. 28: A U.S. District Court judge in Memphis denies Ray's motion to withdraw his guilty plea.Oct. 23: Martin Luther King III turns 18.1976Nov. 16: Attallah Shabazz turns 18.1978Jan.
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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | April 24, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- There may be more at stake than the fates of four white police officers charged in the Rodney King beating, now that the jury has begun deliberations.In many circles, the case has put L.A. law on trial.The jury deliberated 2 1/2 hours yesterday before retiring for the night. They were to resume today."If these guys walk or are not sanctioned in any meaningful way, it will signal there is open season in minority communities suffering from poverty, crime, drugs and gangs," said Joe Hicks, executive director of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, a black civil rights group.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Daily News | March 5, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- In the four years since Los Angeles Police Department officers were captured on videotape beating Rodney King with their batons, use of the once-popular weapon has dropped sharply, LAPD use-of-force records obtained by the Los Angeles Daily News show.Baton use reached an eight-year low last year, figuring in just 41 arrests -- a 92 percent drop from 1990, when batons were used 501 times against suspects resisting arrest, according to Los Angeles Police Department figures.Officers are no longer relying on their batons in large part because of the department's adoption of pepper spray, a cayenne pepper-based agent that leaves most suspects temporarily blinded and gasping, LAPD officials say.Longtime critics of the LAPD such as the American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California say that they welcome the evidence that officers are using batons less frequently.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | May 1, 1992
When the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in April 1968, the mayor of Annapolis and the minister of a large black congregation marched hand-in-hand through the streets to call for unity.Yesterday, former Mayor Roger "Pip" Moyer and the Rev. Leroy Bowman were reunited at a press conference to protest the acquittals of four white Los Angeles police officers in the beating of black motorist Rodney King. They joined more than 50 community leaders, ministers and police officers at Annapolis' historic City Hall to voice their outrage at the verdict.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | April 10, 1991
It might not lead to the departure of Daryl Gates as police chief of Los Angeles, but the videotaped police beating of Rodney King could have long-term effects on the cop-citizen relationship -- not just in the City of Angels, but everywhere.Lawyers who defend cops already are worried about a surge in brutality complaints of dubious foundation. Some cops have heard warnings that their street arrests of criminal suspects will be videotaped by wary citizens.If police officers already feel unloved and second-guessed by the people they serve, the public's reaction to the King beating -- branded into the American psyche by repeated airings of the video -- must certainly make them even more self-conscious and defensive.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 25, 1991
THE LOS ANGELES Police Department deserves respect and support. It has fought hard against internal corruption, served as a virtual laboratory for testing many policing innovations and struggled, often courageously, against an increasing crime rate even though it has fewer officers per population density than most other major departments. . . .Under Chief Daryl F. Gates for the past 13 years, it has initiated improvements in urban policing that have been widely praised and in some cases emulated by other police departments.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 12, 1991
This cop on North Paca Street asks if I've heard about Rodney King. King was the man in Los Angeles beaten by Neanderthals in police uniforms while a video camera recorded everything. The cop on North Paca says King himself has now been arrested."King?" I ask. "Arrested?""Yeah," says the cop. "For impersonating a pinata."I find myself caught between a comic grunt and revulsion. The Rodney King beating has become a metaphor not only for racial divisiveness, but for police-civilian tension, some of which is now playing itself out in Washington, D.C., while big cities around the country look on and hold their collective breath.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | June 10, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Republican Richard Riordan's election a Los Angeles' first new mayor in 20 years reflects more the fear of street crime and its negative impact on the city's image and growth than positive enthusiasm for a new, fresh face in City Hall.Riordan campaigned against Democratic City Councilman Michael Woo, seeking to become Los Angeles' first Asian-American mayor, essentially on the issue of crime in Woo's home district of Hollywood and in the city as a whole, and against the backdrop of the trials in the Rodney King beating.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane | April 24, 1991
JUST WHERE I picked up the notion that public officials should have something of a grip on reality is a mystery to me. Perhaps I'm just peculiar that way. But it seems that City Councilwoman Jacqueline McLean -- who has aspirations to higher public office -- may be living in denial.McLean, in the March 30 edition of the Baltimore Afro-American, responded to a question posed by the editors of the paper: Could the Los Angeles police beating of motorist Rodney King happen in Baltimore?"My first reaction is no," McLean chirped.
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | March 24, 1994
"Fellow American," the letter from Sgt. Stacey C. Koon begins. "Let me be blunt. If you are absolutely, positively convinced that I am guilty as charged in the so-called Rodney King affair, then throw this letter away right now. But if you have the courage to hear the truth and you care about justice being done, read on."I happen to be absolutely, positively convinced that Sergeant Koon is guilty as charged in the "so-called Rodney King affair." But what the heck, I read on anyway."Officer Lawrence Powell and I are the political scapegoats of black radicals and self-serving liberal politicians who know that we are innocent," the letter continues.
NEWS
By MILTON KENT | August 29, 1993
The Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. was nowhere near the Los Angeles nightclub where Rodney King allegedly wrecked his truck eight days ago while presumably drunk. But to some in Baltimore, Rev. Chavis might as well have poured a drink for Mr. King, placed him behind the wheel and put the keys in the truck's ignition.Rev. Chavis, the executive director of the national NAACP, has taken a lot of heat -- usually from whites. He has been accused in this newspaper of "skirting the edges" on issues affecting the black community, while embracing Mr. King, who is "scum" to one local talk show host.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 3, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- A lawyer who helped draft federal sentencing guidelines has told U.S. District Judge John G. Davies that he should consider leniency when he sentences Officer Laurence M. Powell and Sgt. Stacey C. Koon today because the guidelines never anticipated a case like the beating of Rodney G. King."
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | June 10, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Republican Richard Riordan's election a Los Angeles' first new mayor in 20 years reflects more the fear of street crime and its negative impact on the city's image and growth than positive enthusiasm for a new, fresh face in City Hall.Riordan campaigned against Democratic City Councilman Michael Woo, seeking to become Los Angeles' first Asian-American mayor, essentially on the issue of crime in Woo's home district of Hollywood and in the city as a whole, and against the backdrop of the trials in the Rodney King beating.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and John Rivera and Bill Glauber and John Rivera,Staff Writers | April 18, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Midmorning, South Central, and the Men o Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church were on a break, sipping coffee from plastic foam cups and eating Danish.The fog was lifting yesterday. The streets were empty. The verdicts in the Rodney G. King civil rights trial were in.And life went on."The kids are here at church," said Joseph Moss, president of the men's group and organizer of its neighborhood street patrols."They are ready for their art classes, their drama classes, their music classes.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO rTC | April 9, 1993
Let's have a brief current events quiz. It's simple. Tell me who the following people are:1. Rodney King2. Barbara Meller JensenYour time is up. And I can probably guess your score. Fifty percent.You know who Rodney King is because he has become world famous as the videotaped victim of police brutality.But you don't know who Barbara Meller Jensen is, correct?That's understandable. Mrs. Jensen has been in the news only a tiny fraction of the time that Rodney King has.Yet, she is a victim of a crime far more horrifying than the one allegedly committed against Rodney King.
NEWS
May 1, 1992
It is time for Americans to re-learn an old lesson. What happened in California in the Rodney King case is an old story. Study after study of urban race riots in the 1960s and 1970s warned against letting such episodes occur again. And yet they did reappear, in Los Angeles this week.The experts agreed that people riot out of a sense of fear, anger, lack of confidence in the administration of justice and a sense of political impotence. A riot is not only a lot of criminal violence occurring at once.
NEWS
By MILTON KENT | August 29, 1993
The Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. was nowhere near the Los Angeles nightclub where Rodney King allegedly wrecked his truck eight days ago while presumably drunk. But to some in Baltimore, Rev. Chavis might as well have poured a drink for Mr. King, placed him behind the wheel and put the keys in the truck's ignition.Rev. Chavis, the executive director of the national NAACP, has taken a lot of heat -- usually from whites. He has been accused in this newspaper of "skirting the edges" on issues affecting the black community, while embracing Mr. King, who is "scum" to one local talk show host.
NEWS
By The Christian Science Monitor | April 5, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Barring a major surprise, the trial of four police officers charged in the beating of motorist Rodney King will go to the jury this week, possibly as early as Wednesday, legal experts say.With the end of the case looming, authorities are hastening to head off a possible repeat of the rioting that came after a not-guilty verdict in the state trial of the police officers in 1992.In the current trial, prosecutors today begin their last opportunity to rebut 13 days of defense testimony, which ended abruptly Thursday.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | March 30, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- California Highway Patrol Officer Melanie Singer exited the witness stand something of a lone ranger among the law enforcement officers at Rodney King's beating two years ago.Officer Singer, the only officer to testify that she saw King struck directly in the head, left jurors with an insight into police subculture amid testimony that was emotionally powerful.As a badly beaten and bleeding Mr. King lay hogtied and dirty along a road, Officer Singer told of wanting to put on her emergency medical gloves to give him first aid. But fear of ridicule by fellow officers stopped her, she testified yesterday.
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